• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Necc in the_news_08_march13 for web
 

Necc in the_news_08_march13 for web

on

  • 544 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
544
Views on SlideShare
544
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Necc in the_news_08_march13 for web Necc in the_news_08_march13 for web Document Transcript

    • NAVY EXPEDITIONARY COMBAT COMMAND IN THE NEWS Navy Expeditionary Combat Command in the News is a service of the NECC Public AffairsOffice and is used to provide senior leadership and interested NECC personnel around the Fleetwith news about the Navy‘s expeditionary forces. Please do not repost the Clips to any publicly accessible website since we must maintain the integrity of copyrighted material. Friday, March 08, 2013 _________________________________________________________________UPDATE: Diving Accident Claims Two Navy Divershttp://www.navy.mil/search/print.asp?story_id=72398&VIRIN=&imagetype=0From EOD Group 2 Public AffairsNavy Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 28, of Caldwell, Ohio, and Navy Diver 2nd Class RyanHarris, 23, of Gladstone, Mo., died while conducting dive operations at the Aberdeen ProvingGrounds in Aberdeen, Md., Feb. 26. Harris and Reyher were assigned to Mobile Diving andSalvage Unit (MDSU) 2, located at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Ft. Story.Seabee Headquarters Begins Realignmenthttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72445By Daryl Smith, First Naval Construction Division Public AffairsFirst Naval Construction Division (1NCD), the headquarters organization for the Navy Seabees,began a realignment initiative designed to improve efficiency by eliminating a headquarterslayer, March 1.Expeditionary Doctor Continues Training Partnership in Mexicohttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72540By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kay SavareseA Mobile Training Team (MTT) of three U.S. Navy medical specialists, two assigned to NavyExpeditionary Combat Command, deployed to the Search, Rescue and Diving School inAcapulco, Mexico, to teach a 40-hour clinical medical course focusing on hyperbaric oxygentherapy, Feb. 18 to 22.Water well teams improve bases, save millions in costshttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/102679/water-well-teams-improve-bases-save-millions-costs#ixzz2Mgb2BtvoBy Chief Equipment Operator Dawn Mayhugh, Task Force Anchor Public AffairsU.S. Navy Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 133 in Afghanistan arecompleting their fifth water well project, providing coalition forces direct, cost-effective wateraccess on bases across the country, saving the military millions in costs. 1
    • Sailors, Airmen wrap up aircraft salvage operationhttp://www.usafe.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123337318By Staff Sgt. Evelyn Chavez 31st Fighter Wing Public AffairsU.S. Navy divers from the Mobile Diving Salvage Unit 2 and Air Force personnel are wrappingup salvage operation to recover the wreckage of an Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon whichcrashed off the coast of Italy late last month.Marines and Seabees train to build and breachhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/102578/marines-and-seabees-train-build-and-breach#ixzz2MgM7dbSkBy Ens. Humberto Baeza Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 Public AffairsSeabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 conducted inter service training with theU.S. Marine Corps Combat Assault Battalion in Okinawa, Japan, Feb. 20-22.EODMU-3 change of commandhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/102879/eodmu-3-change-command#ixzz2MgNVV1oIBy Lt.Cmdr. Donnell Evans Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group ONEExplosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 3 held a change of command ceremony, March 1, atNaval Base Coronado, Calif. During the ceremony, Cmdr. Lawrence E. Hall relieved Cmdr.Charles Andrews as commanding officer of EODMU 3.Navy EOD Makes Good on Promise to Childrenhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72367By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese, Explosive Ordnance DisposalGroup 2 Public AffairsSailors from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 2 visited kindergartners atCentral Elementary School Feb. 25 for a welcome home luncheon in their honor hosted by thechildren they had been communicating with while on deployment.NMCB-11 announced as recipient of Prestigious Peltier Award for FY 2012http://www.dvidshub.net/news/101710/nmcb-11-announced-recipient-prestigious-peltier-award-fy-2012#ixzz2MgaUT9vjBy Petty Officer 1st Class Jonathan Carmichael Naval Mobile construction Battalion 11Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 11 was announced as the recipient of the Rear AdmiralEugene J. Peltier Award for fiscal year 2012. 2
    • UPDATE: Diving Accident Claims Two Navy Divershttp://www.navy.mil/search/print.asp?story_id=72398&VIRIN=&imagetype=0From EOD Group 2 Public AffairsVIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (NNS) -- Navy Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 28, of Caldwell, Ohio,and Navy Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 23, of Gladstone, Mo., died while conducting diveoperations at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Aberdeen, Md., Feb. 26.Harris and Reyher were assigned to Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, located at JointExpeditionary Base Little Creek-Ft. Story."We are deeply saddened by the loss of our teammates." said Capt. John Coffey, DeputyCommander, Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Group 2. "Petty Officer Harris and PettyOfficer Reyher were exceptional Sailors. Our thoughts and prayers are with their families,friends and shipmates during this difficult time."Harris enlisted in the Navy June 13, 2007 and graduated from Recruit Training Command GreatLakes, Ill. in August 2007. Harris successfully completed dive training at the Navy Diving andSalvage Training Center in Panama City, Fla. and was designated a Navy diver in April 2008. Heserved at Navy Submarine Support Facility in New London, Conn. from May 2008-June 2011,before reporting to MDSU-2 in June 2011.Reyher enlisted in the Navy May 28, 2008 and graduated from Recruit Training Command GreatLakes, Ill. in July 2008. Reyher successfully completed dive training at the Navy Diving andSalvage Training Center in Panama City, Fla. and was designated a Navy diver in February2009. He served at Naval Intermediate Maintenance Facility Pacific Northwest from March2009-April 2012 before reporting to MDSU-2 in April 2012."Ryan and James epitomized the unsung hero persona of the Navy diver. We are fortunate tohave had the opportunity to serve with them," said Cmdr. Michael Runkle, commanding officer,MDSU-2. "We are all deeply saddened by their loss and are focusing on supporting their familiesduring this time of need."EODGRU-2 is conducting an investigation into the deaths of the Sailors. Return to Top StoriesSeabee Headquarters Begins Realignmenthttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72445By Daryl Smith, First Naval Construction Division Public AffairsVIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (NNS) -- First Naval Construction Division (1NCD), the headquartersorganization for the Navy Seabees, began a realignment initiative designed to improve efficiency 3
    • by eliminating a headquarters layer, March 1.1NCD will merge with Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) and subsequentlydisestablish 1NCD. This change will improve headquarters alignment and consolidate the direct,formal relationship between the expeditionary forces and Fleet Forces Command/Pacific Fleet."Seabees remain an essential component of Americas naval force structure and a force multiplierto naval and joint operations," said Rear Adm. Mark A. Handley, commander, 1NCD. "Byreducing a headquarters layer, we create efficiencies and an NECC structure that is bothfunctional and equivalent in size with todays smaller Type Commander staffs. We will continueto provide Seabee engineering and construction capabilities that our Navy and the nation vitallyneed."As part of the realignment, the 1NCD staff will be integrated into NECC, and the 1NCDcommander will be reassigned as deputy commander for NECC. This headquarters changerequires realignment at 1NCDs subordinate commands as well. 1NCD currently oversees SeabeeReadiness Groups and active Naval Construction Regiments located in Gulfport, Miss. and PortHueneme, Calif., as well as four reserve Naval Construction Regiments at other locations acrossthe U.S.Naval Construction Force command and control will be consolidated into two NavalConstruction Groups (NCGs), one for the Pacific and one for the Atlantic. This realignmentprocess began in February and will be complete in April. Certain functions performed at 1NCDwill transfer to NECC, and other functions will transfer to the NCGs.The 20th Seabee Readiness Group, located in Gulfport, Miss., was renamed Naval ConstructionGroup 2 on Feb. 26, and the 31st Seabee Readiness Group, located in Port Hueneme, Calif., isscheduled to be renamed Naval Construction Group 1 on March 11. The commander of the 30thNaval Construction Regiment will serve as the deputy commander for NCG 1, and thecommander for 22nd Naval Construction Regiment will serve as the deputy commander forNCG 2.Reserve regiments and active battalions, along with Underwater Construction Teams (UCTs) andConstruction Battalion Maintenance Units (CBMUs), will report directly to the NCG. Reservebattalions will still report to a reserve regiment.The regiments will remain fully-deployable command elements capable of providing commandand control of expeditionary engineer forces.Established in 2002, 1NCD develops and implements policy and requirements to man, equip andtrain Seabees. The command ensures engineer forces are ready to support continuous combatdeployments and is currently responsible for approximately 13,800 Seabees worldwide. Adeployable command, 1NCD made two combat deployments during Operation Iraqi Freedom.In 2006, the Navy stood up NECC to provide a single headquarters for all expeditionary forces. 4
    • Both commands are located at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story in VirginiaBeach, Va.The 1NCD realignment is scheduled to be complete by May 1.With the motto, "We Build, We Fight," Seabees provide a wide range of military construction,including roads, bunkers, airfields and logistics bases, as well as worldwide humanitarian effortsand disaster response. Nearly 2,000 Seabees are currently deployed, conducting operations inevery Combatant Commanders Area of Responsibility. Return to Top StoriesExpeditionary Doctor Continues Training Partnership in Mexicohttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72540By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kay SavareseVIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (NNS) -- A Mobile Training Team (MTT) of three U.S. Navy medicalspecialists deployed to the Search, Rescue and Diving School in Acapulco, Mexico, to teach a40-hour clinical medical course focusing on hyperbaric oxygen therapy, Feb. 18 to 22.This marks the second year team members conducted this training, stemming from a requestfrom the Mexican navy in 2012."The Mexican navy has the equipment, but their program to develop the expertise to utilize theequipment to its fullest potential is still in its infancy," said Capt. Bruce A. Cohen, force surgeonat Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC). "Weve been doing this a long time, so theyturned to us for assistance. NECC places high focus on assisting our counterparts with thistraining as it better supports the interoperability of shared and joint missions."The Mexican navy has 17 hyperbaric chambers. A hyperbaric chamber is a cylindricalcompartment that artificially reproduces pressure conditions found under the sea, allowing for anisolated form of oxygen therapy to be used in both diving-related and non-diving medicalapplications. These chambers are essential in preventing and treating decompression sickness indivers."Our plan was to essentially train the trainer," said Cohen. "This year, weve updated the courseto reflect additional case studies and current research in the field. Our goal is to build up theirexpertise to increase the number of personnel trained to operate the chambers."The five-day course provided an opportunity for the two navies to participate in lectures, discusscase studies and share knowledge through group interactions. The training included instructionon chamber operations, wound care and basic medicine for treatment of patients in a hyperbaricenvironment. 5
    • "We give them scenarios and discuss the outcomes," said Cohen. "The students know how tooperate the chambers. This course focuses on academics and medicine, and offers a basic reviewof physics and operations."Mexican navy personnel attending the course included 10 physicians, 10 nurses and 10 diversfrom all over their country. The Search, Rescue and Diving School provided students with astate-of-the-art facility, supplying a hyperbaric chamber, real-time instant translators andelectronic whiteboards."They have a phenomenal translation system and people there," said Cohen. "Its real-timetranslation. We wear a headset and it translates as we speak; instantaneously."The translation system allowed the two navies to communicate effectively throughout theclassroom-based course despite language barriers, while a hyperbaric chamber on-site provided aplatform for visual demonstrations."The undersea environment can be harsh and unforgiving and is dangerous to operate in," saidCohen. "A hyperbaric chamber allows for treatment of injuries that could be life threatening toworking divers."The MTT instructing this years course consisted of Capt. Bruce A. Cohen, Capt. Brett B. Hart,head of the Hyperbaric Training Department at the Naval Aerospace Medicine Institute, andMaster Chief Mitchell T. Pearce, the force medical master chief at NECC.Upon completion of this second visit, 60 Mexican navy personnel have graduated from thecourse instructed by the U.S. Navy.NECC is a command element and force provider for integrated maritime expeditionary missions,serving as a single functional command for the Navys expeditionary forces. Return to Top StoriesWater well teams improve bases, save millions in costshttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/102679/water-well-teams-improve-bases-save-millions-costs#ixzz2Mgb2BtvoBy Chief Equipment Operator Dawn Mayhugh, Task Force Anchor Public AffairsCAMP KRUTKE, Afghanistan – Naval engineers in Afghanistan are completing their fifth waterwell project, providing coalition forces direct, cost-effective water access on bases across thecountry, saving the military millions in costs. 6
    • Launching out in Sept. 2012, U.S. Navy Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion(NMCB) 133, Task Force Anchor, began to drill the first of five deep water wells across thecountry.Two 12-man teams took charge of two Laibe drill rigs and more than $2 million worth ofmaterials.As 24-hour drilling operations continued, each team had to overcome obstacles ranging fromequipment repairs to weather delays as the winter season brought rain and snow to some sites.The teams were constantly tested as hidden rock formations and voids changed drilling speeds.By managing the ―mud‖ program through skillful manipulation of chemicals, the teamsprogressed in operations. ―Mud‖ is a combination of water and a number of chemical agents thatallows the water well team to bring soil drilled out of the water well to the surface.As each member honed their expertise in their respective job assignments, the team‘s efficiencyincreased at every site.As Task Force Anchor, part of the Theater Engineer Brigade, Joint Task Force Triple Nickel,nears the completion of the fifth well, all wells have an average depth of nearly 1,000 feet andproduce an average of 100 gallons of clean water per minute.―Coalition and Afghan forces will benefit for years due to their efforts,‖ said Chief Petty OfficerDavid Asbury, construction officer with JTF Triple Nickel.Each well saves the military hundreds of thousands of dollars compared to the costs ofcontracted drilling or having to acquire and transport water from off-base, according to Asbury.This means, already, the military has saved over $2 million thanks to these projects.Across the country, these wells will continue to have a positive impact and increase the qualityof life for thousands of coalition personnel.NMCB 133 is currently deployed to Afghanistan and the U.S. Central Command area ofresponsibility in support of coalition forces, the Afghan National Army and the local population. Return to Top StoriesSailors, Airmen wrap up aircraft salvage operationhttp://www.usafe.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123337318By Staff Sgt. Evelyn Chavez 31st Fighter Wing Public AffairsUSNS GRAPPLE, At Sea -- U.S. Navy and Air Force personnel are wrapping up salvageoperation to recover the wreckage of an Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon which crashed off thecoast of Italy late last month. 7
    • U.S. Navy divers from the Mobile Diving Salvage Unit 2, Company 4, and Airmen from AvianoAir Base, Italy, have been working aboard the USNS Grapple (T-ARS 53) for more than twoweeks. Their mission has been to identify, locate, and recover wreckage of the Aviano fighter jetwhich crashed in the Adriatic Sea during a training mission Jan. 28.Collaborating to better identify debris and information vital to the investigation, the joint salvageoperation faced several challenges throughout the process."Weather, size of debris field and poor visibility have been some of the challenges we have hadto overcome these last few weeks," said Senior Chief Petty Officer Michael Woods, MDSU 2,Company 4, master diver. "We have been forced to operate with even greater caution under theseconditions."Also among the challenges has been identifying components of the aircraft recovered by thedivers."As subject matter experts we are able to provide immediate answers for proper handling ofsensitive equipment," said Master Sgt. Chad Aubuchon, 31st Maintenance Squadron flight chief,aboard the Grapple. "It is important for us to caution the divers on potential dangers that mighthurt them or damage their equipment."After Air Force personnel briefed divers on proper handling of sensitive equipment, members ofthe MDSU 2, Company 4, began operations with scuba dives to locate potential wreckagelocated by underwater scanning devices. Divers then conducted surface-supplied divingoperations which allowed them to perform more difficult tasks such as moving heavier objects."With surface supplied diving operations we are able to stay down in the sea longer and gathermore debris as opposed to scuba," said Woods. "We have unlimited air supply with this type ofdive."The divers recovered over 200 pieces within the first few days despite the large debris field. Thishas been a difficult feat, according to the divers, as the significant amount of soft mud at thebottom of the sea has reduced visibility to zero."We have overcome cold weather, bad sea state, mud and zero visibility," said Petty Officer FirstClass Andrew Swartwood. "Although it has been difficult, we are trained to operate in theseconditions."Despite the difficulties, the Sailors and Airmen remain committed to their mission and report thatthe partnership has been a positive experience."The teamwork I have seen is outstanding," said Aubuchon. "The Navy works well together, andhaving the opportunity to work with them while participating in their traditions is definitely aneye-opening experience." 8
    • Return to Top StoriesMarines and Seabees train to build and breachhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/102578/marines-and-seabees-train-build-and-breach#ixzz2MgM7dbSkBy Ens. Humberto Baeza Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 Public AffairsOKINAWA, Japan — Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 conducted interservice training with the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Assault Battalion in Okinawa, Japan, Feb.20-22.This educational exchange involved NMCB 5 troops teaching Marines how to constructSouthwest Asia huts while CAB Marines demonstrated their demolition skills used to conducturban mobility breaching or what Marines refer to informally as UMBC based on the acronymfor the Marine Corps‘ Urban Mobility Breaching Course.―The training we received from the Marines on UMBC opened our eyes to the dangers theyface,‖ said Builder 3rd Class David Domagala. ―Overall, everyone came away from this trainingexercise with a new found respect for the other service.‖Upon arrival to the demolition range, both Marines and Seabees offloaded their builder‘s tool kitand lumber and began their construction classes. Within minutes both services were working sideby side under the guidance of crew leader Domagala. The Marines and Seabees completed theconstruction of the SWA hut in about five hours.On day two, Seabees received extensive training on building urban breaching shots, initiatingsystems, burn rates and the proper employments of demolition.―It improved the Marines‘ confidence in their knowledge of UMBC, because they had tocommunicate that knowledge to the Seabees,‖ said 1st Lt. Jonathan Bisulca, 3rd platooncommander of Combat Engineer Company.Under the supervision of the CAB Marines, the Seabees were able to construct six distinctcharges from scratch. The power of the charges ranged from a simple doughnut breaching chargeto a much more destructive concrete charge. Once completed with the construction of thecharges, the Seabees were instructed on the proper utilization of a blast blanket and determiningthe standoff distance from the blast. Working side by side and under the watchful eyes of theMarines, the Seabees conducted urban breaching training on the constructed SWA hut.Marine Capt. Benjamin Nichols, NMCB 5‘s assistant operations officer, previously served withthe CAB and shared a unique perspective of the event.―It was special for me to witness the Seabees of NMCB 5 teach construction while the Marines 9
    • of CAB expose the Seabees to their expertise in urban breaching.‖This joint exercise was a chance for the Marines and Seabees to build camaraderie.―Bravo Zulu to the Marines and Seabee crew out there, I hope for more opportunities to crosstrain with Marines,‖ said Steelworker 2nd Class Brandin Salazar, assistant officer-in-charge.NMCB 5 is home ported at Port Hueneme, Calif. and is currently deployed to multiple sitesthroughout the U.S. Pacific Command area of responsibility. Return to Top Stories 10
    • Seabee base makes history with change of command ceremonyhttp://www.wlox.com/story/21353531/seabee-base-makes-history-with-change-of-command-ceremonyBy Doug Walker WLOX 13GULFPORT, MS (WLOX) - It was billed as a historic day on the Seabee base in Gulfport. Achange of command ceremony involving several officers. One unit was decommissioned,another was renamed and then combined with yet another unit that will be called NavalConstruction Group 2.All those changes are in recognition of changing times. Captain Darius Banaji is commander ofthe newly formed Naval Construction Group 2."Were part of a smaller piece thats responding to the Naval construction force in response tochanges in the fiscal climate and were reorganizing the Navy in a downsizing," Banajiexplained. "Weve positioned ourselves the best to be able to support the future and still be arelevant, capable expeditionary force."Base commander Captain Frederick Burgess will still hold that title under the realignment."I think it does streamline our command and control. It sets us up for future operations andpositions. Thats very well for future changes that may come our way," Burgess said.The Seabee base will still play a vital role, despite the changes. Rear Admiral Mark Handley isthe Naval Construction Forces Commander."Now, we will combine all of our efforts here in Gulfport and this will be the center for ourefforts for the future," Handley said.While this change of command ceremony reflects the new economic realities facing the Navy,and indeed the entire military, the mission of the Seabee is not going to be changing all thatmuch. Theyre going to be helping people around the world, according to Handley."They remain ready to fight and win our wars when we need to, but also that they can focus onpreventing war aspect of our business," Handley explained. "Thats when we go off into thePacific or into Africa and other places and we build partnerships by the works that the Seabeesdo, through building clinics, schools, and other things."A job the Seabees do better than anybody.Another change of command will take place in June when base commanding officer CaptainBurgess will be replaced by Captain Paul Odenthal. Return to Top StoriesEODMU-3 change of commandhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/102879/eodmu-3-change-command#ixzz2MgNVV1oIStory by Lt.Cmdr. Donnell Evans Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group ONECORONADO, Calif. - Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 3 held a change of commandceremony, March 1, at Naval Base Coronado, Calif. During the ceremony, Cmdr. Lawrence E.Hall relieved Cmdr. Charles Andrews as commanding officer of EODMU 3. 11
    • "There are many people that stray away from difficult tasks, but you dont have to look anyfurther than mobile unit three to find individuals that are ready to put their life on the line daily.Your courage, patriotism, and willingness to carry the fight to the enemy are the very reasonAmerica is the most dominant military force in the world,‖ said Andrews. ―Every day I washumbled by the selfless warriors of EODMU 3. I will remember you always as the bravest menand women with whom I have served."Andrews assumed command of EODMU 3 in June 2010. Since taking the helm, Andrews led theunit during two deployments to Afghanistan.During his tour at EODMU 3, Andrews also trained and deployed seven special operation forceplatoons, seven combat expeditionary support platoons, three carrier strike group platoons andone mine countermeasures platoon for combat operations in direct support of Operations NewDawn, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom.Capt. Ed Eidson, commander, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 1, served asguest speaker for the ceremony.―It‘s very easy to lead a command when everything goes right. That‘s not hard. As acommanding officer, your job is to lead when things don‘t go right. Charles, you did anexceptional job,‖ said Eidson. ―Lawrence, you have been preparing for this your entire life, Iknow you will do well.‖Andrews is a graduate of the University of Mississippi and was commissioned an ensign in Mayof 1992. His next assignment is to the Center for Explosive Ordnance Disposal and Diving inPanama City, Fl.―Everybody‘s told me for the last 28 years, command at sea is the greatest job in the Navy, and itis,‖ said Hall. ―It‘s also one of the most humbling jobs that I know I‘ll ever have, because I‘llhave to try and live up to what is demanded to lead men and women like this.‖Hall enlisted in the Navy in May of 1985, is a graduate of Virginia Polytechnic University, andwas commissioned in May of 1996.EODMU 3 provides operational explosive ordnance disposal capability as required for thelocation, identification, rendering safe, recovery, field evaluation and disposal of all explosiveordnance, including chemical and nuclear weapons.U.S. Navy EOD is the world‘s premier combat force for countering explosive hazards andconducting expeditionary diving and salvage. Return to Top Stories 12
    • Navy EOD Makes Good on Promise to Childrenhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72367By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese, Explosive Ordnance DisposalGroup 2 Public AffairsMOYOCK, N.C. (NNS) -- Sailors from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 2visited kindergartners at Central Elementary School Feb. 25 for a welcome home luncheon intheir honor hosted by the children they had been communicating with while on deployment.As part of the project, the class adopted the Sailors and sent care packages to them while theywere deployed. In return, the class requested that if time permitted the deployed Sailors wouldbecome "pen pals" and write responses back to the class."Every year we try to get pen pals," said Kathleen Stadler, kindergarten teacher at CentralElementary. "They love it, they absolutely love it. It keeps the kids excited about writing andthey actually want to do it."Every year the children write service members serving overseas as part of the program and whilethe students understand the Sailors may not be available once the deployment is over; this yearthey got a surprise."We understand that this is their time to be with their families and for them to come out of theirway and come down here and spend time with us, thats huge and we appreciate that a lot," saidStadler. "It speaks volumes and its important people know that."Those feelings were shared by school principal Daun Belangia who said it is important childrenget to see what service members are doing for them and the country."Watching the kids sing the thank you song to me was a very emotional thing," said Belangia."Its important to me that these children understand what a big deal it is that these guys are doingtheir job not just for themselves or their families but for everyone and its an honor to have themin our building today."Two Sailors from EODMU 2 answered the childrens questions, read stories and demonstratedthe PackBot transportable robotics system they use in their job every day in appreciation for allof the support the children gave them while deployed overseas."It was a good opportunity to meet all the kids and try to provide them some positive feedback,"said Lt. Keith Caton, platoon commander, EODMU 2. "This was our way of showing ourappreciation to Mrs. Stadlers kindergarten class for all the letters and support they gave us whilewe were deployed.""It feels really good and I think it went well," said Explosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class DanielFranklin, EODMU 2, platoon 6 lead petty officer. "I enjoyed receiving packages from thechildren and reading their letters and seeing the drawings they would make for us. We shared 13
    • them with the Soldiers who were there with us as well."Navy community outreach programs are a way for the Navy to give back to the community."You could tell the kids were excited to see us in uniform," said Franklin. "They got to see therobot and it was great to see them so happy and excited to see us."In addition to generating good will and excitement between the children and service members,Stadler uses the penpal program to keep children engaged in writing. To this Franklin had someparting words for the children:"Keep up writing even if its not fun and thank you very much for your support to the ArmedForces and what they do for your country," said Franklin. "Its great to have this kind of support.Oh and listen to your teachers!" Return to Top StoriesNMCB-11 announced as recipient of Prestigious Peltier Award for FY 2012http://www.dvidshub.net/news/101710/nmcb-11-announced-recipient-prestigious-peltier-award-fy-2012#ixzz2MgaUT9vjStory by Petty Officer 1st Class Jonathan Carmichael Naval Mobile construction Battalion 11GULFPORT, Miss. – Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 11 was announced as the recipient ofthe Rear Admiral Eugene J. Peltier Award for fiscal year 2012.The announcement came in a Jan. 31, 2013, unclassified message from Commander, NavalFacilities Engineering Command, Rear Adm. Katherine L. Gregory.Units selected for this prestigious award are recognized leaders in the Naval Construction Forcein safety, overall performance, readiness, construction accomplishments, equipmentmanagement, logistics programs, retention, and training.NMCB-11 completed an arduous eight-month United States Central Command deployment inAfghanistan during 2012 in which the battalion set the stage for the surge drawdown of U.S. andcoalition forces and eventual transfer of mission to the Afghan forces.The Peltier award is named for a legendary and distinguished Civil Engineer Corps and Seabeeleader. Commissioned into the Navy in 1940, Peltier was appointed Chief of the Bureau of Yardsand Docks, and Chief of Civil Engineers of the Navy in 1957 where he served until 1962. Peltierdied Feb. 13, 2004, at the age of 93 and was interred in Arlington National Cemetery inArlington, Va.NMCB-11 is a Seabee battalion specializing in contingency construction, disaster response, andhumanitarian assistance. The Battalion is home-ported in Gulfport, Miss. 14
    • Return to Top StoriesReady for Combat: Amanda Rutledge Is a Woman Warriorhttp://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20675876,00.html#disqus_threadPeople MagazineTen members of the Quick Reaction Force patrol a remote wooded village. Suddenly enemymachine-gun fire bursts from the trees. A man cries out, "Im hit!" As the squad takes cover, alone warrior dashes back to the fight zone to drag the wounded man from harms way.Had this been war and not a training scenario at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Amanda Rutledge wouldlikely have earned a commendation for valor. With 35 lbs. of gear on her back, the only femaletrainee in a class of 43 at the Navys Riverine Combat Skills course proved that she could get amuch larger combatant to safety."I think I won them over," says Rutledge, 23, who is among the first women training for combatsince the Jan. 24 Pentagon decision to open combat roles to them. "When I heard about it, Ithought, ‗I can do this! " says Rutledge, a former art student from Mentor, Ohio, who enlisted in2010 and was recently promoted to Gunners Mate 2. While the new policy has critics – Centerfor Military Readiness President Elaine Donnelly calls it "irresponsible . . . physical strength is afactor" – for the 202,400 women currently serving, the move "reflects the reality on the ground,"says Becky Halstead, retired Army brigadier general. Until women make up greater numbers inthese programs, "Im odd woman out," says Rutledge. "I want to show that if I can do it, otherscan." Return to Top Stories 15