Digital Media Across Asia - Government Uses Of Social Media

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Governments face unique challenges with regards to using social media. What are some of these challenges and how can governments overcome them? This deck addresses these issues and draws up a path to success.

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Digital Media Across Asia - Government Uses Of Social Media

  1. 1. DIGITAL MEDIA ACROSS ASIA<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />3 March 2010<br />
  2. 2. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Background<br />General trends<br /><ul><li>Governments across the world have begun to recognise the need to embrace social media
  3. 3. However, they are not sure how exactly to use social media</li></ul>“I think we've reached the tipping point, when the question is not whether government should embrace social networking technologies, but how most productively to use them.”<br />– Dr. Steve Kelman, Weatherhead Professor of Public Management, Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government – <br />“The Singapore government, as a whole, is not averse to using new media. We’re not ruling out the opportunities it presents us. But we’re not completely sure how to use it yet.”<br />– Goh Yam Song, Deputy Director, Emergency Preparedness, Land Transport Authority, Singapore – <br />“We’re still learning. It’s not easy to make this transition (to new media). It’s like going from sea to land… you’re changing your medium and you need to get comfortable with it. But we’re working hard at it.”<br />– Lee Hsien Loong, Prime Minister, Singapore – <br />Learning how to use social media can be tricky because governments face<br />a variety of unique challenges…<br />
  4. 4. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Challenges<br />Tough to achieve consistency in social media policy across different government bodies<br /><ul><li>Wide spectrum of government bodies have different needs for information security
  5. 5. For instance, information from/about Singapore’s Ministry of Defence is justifiably much more secretive and confidential than information from/about her National Arts Council</li></ul>Loss of control over information transmission presents a greater risk to governments than to businesses<br /><ul><li>Loss of control may lead to public disorder and chaos
  6. 6. For instance, malicious comments about different races and religions posted by netizens can lead to outrage among different segments of society
  7. 7. Cautious initial reaction by governments towards social media is a testament to this challenge</li></ul>Difficult to get the general public interested in government affairs<br /><ul><li>Common perception, especially among the youth, that government affairs are boring</li></li></ul><li>Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Challenges<br />Inherent bureaucracy lengthens response time and impedes conversation<br /><ul><li>Characteristic red tape conflicts with the more egalitarian nature of social media
  8. 8. Each department usually only sanctions one high ranking official as a spokesperson
  9. 9. May not have the time to converse with netizens</li></ul>Disastrous outcomes can result when governments use social media if these challenges are not well managed and overcome…<br />
  10. 10. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Worst Practices<br />Stark unjustified discrepancies between different government bodies’ attitude towards social media<br /><ul><li>Example
  11. 11. Malaysia’s PM, Najib Razak, uses social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter
  12. 12. However Malaysia Information, Communications, and Culture Minister, Dr. Rais Yatim, said that Malaysians, especially Muslims, must avoid being immersed in Facebook and Twitter
  13. 13. Netizens began to ridicule Dr. RaisYatim, saying that he is old-fashioned and backward and making many “YoRais so old” jokes (a parody of the popular American “Yo Mama so fat” jokes) about Dr. RaisYatim’s age under the hashtag #yorais and that became on of the top trending topics on Twitter</li></li></ul><li>Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Worst Practices<br />Unclear objectives and poor execution<br /><ul><li>Example
  14. 14. Singapore’s Ministry of Education (MOE) launched an online portal that captures and display tweets from the twittersphere with the hashtag #tday09 so that students can dedicate well wishes to their teachers
  15. 15. However, most of teachers who were supposed to receive the well wishes did not know about the portal and this led bloggers to question MOE’s objective for the campaign and criticise its execution
  16. 16. MOE’s head of web management later conceded that they should have done more to publicise the effort</li></ul>Lack of content moderation when necessary<br /><ul><li>Example
  17. 17. One student used vulgarities in his #tday09 tweet and it was displayed on the portal</li></ul>Clearly, some things can go wrong when social media is not used wisely. But there certainly also are cases of governments that have successfully used social media…<br />
  18. 18. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Case Study: Singapore Feedback Unit’s REACH Initiative<br />Summary of Case Study<br /><ul><li>Decided to use social media to reach out to and connect with the youth and young professionals who are active in these channels
  19. 19. Recognised that different demographic segments of the population are comfortable with different communication channels
  20. 20. Utilised a range of channels including a webpage, a Facebook page, an online forum, and an user generated blog to reach citizens
  21. 21. Saw active discussion on the discussion board about issues ranging from transportation to the environment
  22. 22. Till date, thousands of user inputs have been gathered
  23. 23. Most recently garnered a total of approximately 21,000 page views and 200 feedback inputs in the two days following the Ministry of Finance’s Budget 2010 announcement</li></li></ul><li>Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Case Study: Singapore Feedback Unit’s REACH Portal<br />Reasons for success<br /><ul><li>Guidelines
  24. 24. Netizens were “free to comment on any issue they feel strongly about, as long as their comments (were) not deemed inappropriate and / or insensitive to other users, particularly with regard to race and religion.“
  25. 25. Allowed people to feedback through the medium they were most comfortable with
  26. 26. Gave everyone an opportunity to speak up whether it be through posting a short comment on Facebook, debating on the forum, or writing an entire article on the forum
  27. 27. Staff monitored the postings for compilation and sorting and sent all feedback to the relevant ministries for their consideration
  28. 28. Accelerated the bureaucratic process to allow for quicker government responses
  29. 29. Relevant ministries’ responses were posted in a dedicated section, “Your Feedback, Our Response”
  30. 30. Showed people that their feedback were indeed considered and at times, acted upon</li></li></ul><li>Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Case Study: Singapore MCYS’ “Think Family Campaign”<br />Summary of Case Study<br /><ul><li>Created a television commercial to promote family values that was also uploaded onto its YouTube page
  31. 31. In addition to the English language version of the commercial, its YouTube page showed Mandarin, Malay, and Tamil language versions
  32. 32. YouTube page contained a link to its Facebook page
  33. 33. Both pages allowed people to comment on the commercial
  34. 34. Facebook page invited people to upload a photo of themselves with their partners and to share what makes them a beautifully imperfect couple
  35. 35. 10 couples with the most votes would win cash prizes
  36. 36. YouTube video garnered over 720,000 views
  37. 37. Netizens copied the video and re-posted it on their own YouTube pages
  38. 38. Facebook page saw around 100,000 unique visitors, 14,000 fans, and 370 contest submissions
  39. 39. Facebook page received 5,000 comments on “how the film moved them and reminded them not to take relationships for granted”</li></li></ul><li>Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Case Study: Singapore MCYS’ “Think Family Campaign”<br />Reasons for success<br /><ul><li>Clear objectives
  40. 40. Wanted to promote family values through awareness of its campaign
  41. 41. High quality television commercial
  42. 42. Won a Golden Kancil at the Kancil Awards 2009
  43. 43. Humorous and moving
  44. 44. Integrated campaign
  45. 45. Many avenues of exposure created many opportunities for people to discover the campaign through a channel they frequent
  46. 46. Acclaimed commercial led people to YouTube to search for it
  47. 47. People shared the YouTube video and it spread virally
  48. 48. Links from its YouTube video page drove traffic to its Facebook page
  49. 49. Spoke the people’s language, used the people’s medium
  50. 50. Speaking the languages of the four main ethnic groups in Singapore and using both traditional and social media, people from all segments of society were able to come into contact with the campaign and understand it
  51. 51. Engagement
  52. 52. Contest allowed people to upload user generated content and vote</li></li></ul><li>Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Case Study: Australia’s National Human Rights Online Consultation<br />Summary of Case Study<br /><ul><li>Aimed to seek a range of views from across Australia about the protection and promotion of human rights
  53. 53. People were able to share their views by making a written submission either online or by post, by attending a community roundtable discussion, or by posting a comment onto an online consultation forum
  54. 54. Received hundreds of rigorously argued viewpoints
  55. 55. Used Twitter to update people of new posts on its forum and also to listen to and converse with people who shared their views
  56. 56. Conversation continues till today even though the online consultation ended in mid 2009
  57. 57. Views and ideas offered by the Australian community during the consultation process were documented in a report to the government</li></li></ul><li>Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Case Study: Australia’s National Human Rights Online Consultation<br />Reasons for success<br /><ul><li>Guidelines for moderation
  58. 58. Specifically addressed the issues of advertising, impersonation, offensive language, slander, spam, threats, etc.
  59. 59. Prevented appearance of inappropriate/irrelevant content
  60. 60. Frequent and prompt replies to comments
  61. 61. Showed that the government was indeed reading their comments and taking their views into consideration
  62. 62. Allowed for continuous conversation relays
  63. 63. Informed people of new postings through tweets, comment alerts, and RSS feeds
  64. 64. Kept people aware of new content
  65. 65. New viewpoints triggered even more discussion
  66. 66. Some comments came from people who had been reading but felt no urge to contribute until then
  67. 67. Ensured continuous involvement</li></ul>From these 3 cases,<br />a number of best practices can be observed…<br />
  68. 68. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Best Practices<br />Set clear, achievable, and measurable objectives at the beginning<br /><ul><li>Clearly articulated objectives aid in the creation and implementation of appropriate strategies through the appropriate channels and enable accurate measurement of success.</li></ul>Be transparent about intent and deliver on promises<br /><ul><li>Showing people that their involvement is sincerely and earnestly valued and desired is paramount. If people are not convinced, at best, they may not participate, and at worst, they may criticise the pretentiousness.</li></ul>Use the right channels<br /><ul><li>Which channels are suitable depends on the target audience. Different groups of people use different types of social media and exhibit different kinds of online behaviour. Matching the social media strategy to their behaviour increases the likelihood of them being highly engaged.</li></ul>Put guidelines for use into place<br /><ul><li>It is important to maintain a high degree of netizen autonomy while enforcing a</li></ul>reasonable level of censorship/moderation to prevent PR disasters. The key<br />here is balance!<br />
  69. 69. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Best Practices<br />Employ an integrated campaign that harnesses the full potential of numerous synergised platforms<br /><ul><li>An effective and meaningful marketing mix of various platforms, including traditional media, will help to reach a much wider audience and also creates a multiplier effect when users are able to link and share content across various channels.</li></ul>Create engaging content using interactive channels<br /><ul><li>Content is king! Interesting and engaging content that draws positive attention is pertinent.</li></ul>Allow for several trustworthy people to respond to user generated content promptly<br /><ul><li>Without government responses, the problem of one-way communication resurfaces and conversation is hampered. A pool of trustworthy people capable of responding wisely is needed to facilitate smooth conversation.</li></ul>Inform people whenever new content is posted<br /><ul><li>Updates prolong involvement and new content provides more opportunities to trigger</li></ul> greater interest and engagement.<br />After a social media initiative has been executed,<br />to determine whether it is successful,<br />it should be properly evaluated…<br />
  70. 70. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Measurement<br />(Objectives of the social media initiative should have already been determined)<br />Determine success criteria and KPIs<br /><ul><li>Ensure the KPIs directly measure the goals and objectives set out to achieve
  71. 71. Different metrics measure different things
  72. 72. The number of page views and mentions are good indicators of awareness
  73. 73. The number of comments could be a good gauge of participation in initiatives to gather feedback
  74. 74. The number of fans and positive comments are possible signs of strong support
  75. 75. Responses to well crafted surveys that measure correlation and causation show whether a campaign successfully altered attitudes and/or behaviour</li></ul>Build a scorecard that prioritizes KPIs<br /><ul><li>The KPIs identified may not be uniformly important. Allocating greater weightage to more important KPIs helps provide more accurate evaluation.</li></ul>Utilise proper web analytics to mine data and monitor and evaluate the initiative<br /><ul><li>Some tools include Google Analytics, Radian6, Twitterlyzer, and Webtrends
  76. 76. Different analytic tools have different functions. Be sure to understand them</li></ul> well before using them.<br />
  77. 77. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Path to Success<br />Roadmap<br />Stage 1:<br />Analysis & Formulation<br /><ul><li>Define issues, objectives, and desired outcomes
  78. 78. Gauge existing web presence
  79. 79. Understand target audience</li></ul>Stage 2:<br />Execution<br /><ul><li>Use relevant social media tools
  80. 80. Set up a collaborative knowledge network and educate people on it
  81. 81. Reach out to key influencers
  82. 82. Generate relevant content, bearing in mind the aforementioned best practices</li></ul>Stage 3:<br />Monitoring & Evaluation<br /><ul><li>Continually monitor activity
  83. 83. Respond and re-engage accordingly
  84. 84. Measure performance
  85. 85. Rectify problems</li></ul>Where necessary, re-visit Stage 1 and review the analysis and formula<br />
  86. 86. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Bibliography<br />Burrowes, B. (2009). Social Media Proves a Hit for MCYS Campaign [Online exclusive0. Marketing-Interactive. Retrieved February 20, 2010, from http://www.marketing-interactive.com/news/12954<br /> <br />Hicks, R. (2009). Security Officials Ponder Use of Social Media [Online exclusive]. FutureGov. Retrieved February 12, 2010, from http://www.futuregov.net/articles/2009/oct/27/security-officials-muse-social-media-intelligence-/<br /> <br />Hicks, R. (2009). Singapore to Engage New Media at General Elections [Online exclusive]. FutureGov. Retrieved March 2, 2010, from http://www.futuregov.net/articles/2009/feb/24/singapore-engage-new-media-general-elections/<br /> <br />Kelman, S. (2009, September 22). Social Media in Government: Welcome to the Tipping Point. Retrieved March 2, 2010, from http://fcw.com/Blogs/Lectern/2009/09/Social-networking-and-government-the-tipping-point.aspx<br />
  87. 87. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Bibliography<br />Kok, A. (2008). Singapore Govt Experiments with Social Media [Online exclusive]. FutureGov. Retrieved February 12, 2010, from http://www.futuregov.net/articles/2008/sep/17/singapore-experiments-social-media/<br /> <br />Maia, D. (2009, August 31). MOE’s Teachers’ Day Dedication Portal #tday09. Retrieved March 2, 2010, from http://www.daphnemaia.net/moes-teachers-day-dedication-portal-tday09<br /> <br />Malaysians Advised Against Being Immersed in Facebook, Twitter. (2010, January 16). The Star Online. Retrieved February 16, 2010, from http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2010/1/16/nation/20100116175608&sec=nation<br /> <br />MCYS’ 2010 Project with LB after Kancil Win! [Online exclusive]. Adoimagazine. Retrieved March 1, 2010, from http://www.adoimagazine.com/newhome/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=5082:mycs-2010-project-with-lb-after-kancil-win&catid=1:breaking-news&Itemid=5<br />
  88. 88. Ingrid Mak<br />Ng Hui Min<br />Ong Wee Kiat Bob<br />Michelle Sng Suat Li<br />Naresh s/o Vijaykumaran<br />Joseph Wee Yeong Yew<br />Government Uses of Social Media<br />Bibliography<br />Most S’poreans Support Broad Thrust & Objectives of Budget: REACH. (2010, February 24). Channel NewsAsia. Retrieved February 24, 2010, from http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/1039638/1/.html<br /> <br />Tay, D. (2009, August 21). Thoughts on Teachersday.sg and #tday09. Retrieved February 20, 2010 from http://uniquefrequency.com/2009/08/31/thoughts-on-teachersdaysg-and-tday09/<br /> <br />Zestful One. (2009, January 19). Malaysian Twitter Users Put RaisYatim on Trending Topics #yorais. Retrieved February 16, 2010 from http://me.zestful.org/2010/01/malaysian-twitter-users-put-rais-yatim-on-trending-topics-yorais/<br /> <br />

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