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Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
Chapter 16   persuasive public speaking
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Chapter 16 persuasive public speaking

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Presentation created for COMM 107 - Oral Communication: Principles and Practice …

Presentation created for COMM 107 - Oral Communication: Principles and Practice

University of Maryland

Source: Communication: A Social and Career Focus by Berko, Wolvin & Wolvin

Published in: Education
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  • 1. Chapter 16: Persuasive Public Speaking If you are opinionated, here is your chance.
  • 2. Types of persuasive speeches <ul><li>Conviction </li></ul><ul><li>Action </li></ul><ul><li>Good persuasive speeches are… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Timely </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Controversial </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Audience-aware </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Well-developed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Valuable to society </li></ul></ul>
  • 3. Persuasion process <ul><li>Claim </li></ul><ul><li>Appeals </li></ul><ul><li>Done? </li></ul><ul><li>NO! </li></ul>
  • 4. Persuasion process Things to consider <ul><li>Theory of field-related standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not all people reach conclusion in the same way, thus they may react differently to the same evidence or psychological appeals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Include as many appeals as you can </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Group norm standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When speaking to a group, you can assume that they will have some similar or overlapping views </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Individual norm standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Some individuals are more influential than others. If you get them on your side, everyone else is in the bag </li></ul></ul>
  • 5. Components of the persuasive speech
  • 6. Components of a persuasive speech <ul><li>Ethos </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Speaker credibility </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Logos </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Logical arguments </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Pathos </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Psychological appeals </li></ul></ul>
  • 7. Speaker credibility (ethos) <ul><li>Competence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wisdom </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Authority </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>knowledge </li></ul></ul>
  • 8. Ethos
  • 9. Speaker credibility (ethos) <ul><li>Charisma </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Appealing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Concerned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enthusiastic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sincere </li></ul></ul>
  • 10. Speaker credibility (ethos) <ul><li>Character </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reputation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Honesty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sensitivity </li></ul></ul>
  • 11. Logos
  • 12. Logical arguments (logos) <ul><li>Your speech has to “make sense” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clear statement of the purpose of what you are proposing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reasons you believe or want the audience to believe in what you are proposing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cite credible sources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Well-developed arguments that flow </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Statement of desired outcome, stand or action </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Absence of false facts, or partial information </li></ul></ul>
  • 13. Logical arguments guide your central idea <ul><li>Proposition of facts (will) </li></ul><ul><li>Proposition of value (good, bad) </li></ul><ul><li>Proposition of policy (should) </li></ul><ul><li>Inductive argument (evidence, conclusion) </li></ul><ul><li>Deductive argument (premise, conclusion) </li></ul><ul><li>Whatever your choice, you need valid evidence </li></ul>
  • 14. Logical fallacies <ul><li>Generalizations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All Greeks… </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Faulty analogical reasoning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>AIDS vs. Bubonic plagues </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Faulty causal reasoning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Something caused something else, no qualification </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ignoring the issue </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevant arguments used to obscure the issue </li></ul></ul>
  • 15. Logical fallacies <ul><li>Ad hominem arguments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Attacks on personal character of the source </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ad populum arguments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Appeal to people’s prejudices and passions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ad ignorantium arguments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Attempt to prove that something is true because it cannot be disproved </li></ul></ul>
  • 16. How do you sell your point of view? <ul><li>Critical thinking </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Propose plan of action, Set forth criteria, Propose solution </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Comparative advantage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Propose solution(s) that are workable, desirable, and practical </li></ul></ul>
  • 17. How do you sell your point of view? <ul><li>Elaboration Likelihood Model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If the topic is one that the listener has encountered before, is interested and involved in, and enjoys talking about, he/she is more likely to process the speaker’s arguments </li></ul></ul>
  • 18. How do you sell your point of view? <ul><li>Social support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If the individual feels that he/she has the support of others and they’re all “in it together,” he/she will be persuaded by a message </li></ul></ul>
  • 19. How do you sell your point of view? <ul><li>Monroe’s Motivated Sequence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Attention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Satisfaction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Visualization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Action </li></ul></ul>
  • 20. Pathos
  • 21. Psychological appeals (pathos) <ul><li>Ethnographic theory of human drives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Survival </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pleasure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Territoriality </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs </li></ul>
  • 22. Appeals to motivate listeners <ul><li>Adventure </li></ul><ul><li>Anger </li></ul><ul><li>Companionship </li></ul><ul><li>Deference </li></ul><ul><li>Fear </li></ul><ul><li>Gender </li></ul><ul><li>Guilt </li></ul><ul><li>Happiness </li></ul><ul><li>Health </li></ul><ul><li>Hero worship </li></ul><ul><li>Humor </li></ul><ul><li>Independence </li></ul><ul><li>Liking </li></ul><ul><li>Loyalty </li></ul><ul><li>Nostalgia </li></ul><ul><li>Revulsion </li></ul><ul><li>Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Savings </li></ul><ul><li>Sex </li></ul><ul><li>Sympathy </li></ul>
  • 23. And remember that all of this has to be arranged in a way that makes sense
  • 24.  
  • 25. BONUS

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