Evolution of the blended learning environment

1,270 views
1,158 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,270
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
827
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • External forces: Federal government funding cuts, resulting in competition for students Better/faster/stronger infrastructure and software: Higher speed internet, appropriate hardware, robust software Access to technology: more people have access to high speed internet/ hardware How is the Faculty of Education responding to these changes?
  • By incorporating hybrid components into the courses
  • Flexibility of synchronous – learn at your own time/ review as many times as needed / cater to different types of learners (tactile based, audio based, visual based – reading transcript) Personal touch of f2f
  • Tried and tested hardware and software, and well researched best practices.
  • More than increase student enrollment, whether a specialized program is offered depends on the number of students
  • Traditional definition of blended: f2f real time plus online Newer definition: mixing media and methods of delivery McSporran & King (2002)
  • The real-time online instruction can take place through web conference, video conference, or a combination of both
  • This has been a very fast paced change. How our practice has changed over the last 3 years
  • More recently, campus-wide initiative to create an online course shell for every credit course. Reasons for this initiative: Area to continue discussion after the class - enhancing the learning experience - to expand the classroom environment from physical to virtual and enable dipping into common resources (such as library, media and so on). Upgrading general knowledge of and comfort level with technology – introducing the use of LMS/synchronous meeting format to faculty/students. Our TEO students – leaders in the classrooms.
  • How do we respond to this this increase in hybrid environments? Need for more personnel (Contractors, GAAS, additional permanent staff) Our support model had evolved to include: Training additional support staff, orientation for instructors, students; provide drop in sessions & workshops How do we keep up? Keep up with ed tech innovation/best practices Make senior administrators aware of the demands and requirements Investing in internal infrastructure: upgrading meeting rooms, equipment, repurpose existing equipment, collaborating with other units
  • We have the 4 guiding principles when developing new hybrid programs or courses
  • Build capacity. General knowledge and awareness of teaching/learning trends. And build specific skills of setting up, navigating, and facilitating in this new space.
  • When we incorporated the hybrid model, we used the ADDIE process, developed by Florida State University. Let us go through our development process. We will show you the evolution of the online course content we use in our hybrid courses, as well as demonstrate our rationale behind the changes.
  • Who are the learners and what are their characteristics? Live class with undergrad students (“lectured to”) but the video clips were part of a grad course, the videos are meant to be discussion points (more than just lectures). Is it feasible? – internet connection Environment scan of available technology – for capturing and delivering
  • It’s very important to sit down with the instructors in this stage to make sure the environment is sustainable, that adequate support and training are in place. Ideally, as Dr. Bates mentioned in the keynote this morning, “training of all instructor should be systematic and compulsory”.
  • Prior to the start of the course, training should be provided to students, instructors, and support staff to use the new technology (hands-on workshop/tutorials, screen capture videos, etc) Once the course has started, gather information for best practices
  • As the course continues, provide trouble shooting and observe and provide feedback and suggestions.
  • In 2009, An instructor was leaving UBC, he wanted to captured the sessions he was going to teach live for the last time, so the clips can be used as course content in future online courses.
  • What we came up with is recording a live session
  • Minimal change to instructor’s practice (still teaching f2f) Minimal change to students’ study practice (read – discuss / watch – discuss) Transcription is available (for students who can benefit from review the words)
  • Unclear text Long recording and post-editing Live session means more chances of things “go wrong” – was it really necessary to have Brent on the camera when he is not speaking to the viewer? Disconnected from the instructor. Long video clip, may result in cognitive overload
  • Voice over Powerpoint
  • Relies heavily on the the speaker’s ability to use the medium effectively – Powerpoint containing ALL the talking points? Or main points to prompt further discussion? Can feel a bit sterile, and lacking the human elements
  • Screen captured Powerpoint with audio and video. Done completely by the instructor.
  • Can not Highlight, add, draw on top existing text.
  • Screen capture of Powerpoint on a SmartBoard with audio and video
  • This includes the ability to interact with the content
  • This is a platform developed by the Faculty of Arts at UBC. The instructor could upload material produced by any of the methods mentioned previously.
  • Video record a session - Minimal change to instructor’s practice Minimal change to students’ study practice Transcription is available   Voice over Powerpoint – inherit all the positives of the previous technology, plus Content is editable Content is high resolution Content is in digestible chunks   Video with Powerpoint – inherit all the positives of the previous technology, plus Human touch Content can include websites, YouTube videos, or specialized software   Video with Smartboard – inherit all the positives of the previous technology, plus Maintaining the ability to edit content, and at the same time, preserving the natural flow and movement in a face-to-face session Collaborative video annotation – inherit all the positives of the previous technology, plus Adds a social dimension to the teaching/learning process Discussion is integrated with the video Mobile friendly What do you think the result is?
  • 1 out of 17 used CLAS, in fact, some even asked for the non-narrated version of the PowerPoint file
  • Steep learning curve to using the platform Technology overload – this group of students is using LMS, self assessment, online discussion, and web conference
  • Suitability of the topic with the video format – Methodology, very fact/rules based Presenter’s style Lecture style – undergrad/grad (lecture driven or discussion driven) Unclear expectations of how to use the system (students: are the comments graded? instructor: am I suppose to insert prompting questions in the video, or let the students use this platform completely on their own?)
  • So where are we now? Remember this? Now, all UBC credit courses have the potential to be hybrid courses if the instructors use the online course shells. All the courses now are capable of hosting recorded lectures online. This means reducing the amount of time the instructors stand in front of the class, and use classroom time for deep discussions. The videos could be about any subject, and could be of practicum, live performances. The videos could be produced by faculty or students.
  • Evolution of the blended learning environment

    1. 1. Our story:Evolution of blended learningenvironmentSharon Hu, Instructional DesignerNatasha Boskic, Senior Manager, Learning DesignUniversity of British Columbia
    2. 2. Who we are
    3. 3. Recent external developments
    4. 4. Incorporate hybridcomponents
    5. 5. Why hybrid?
    6. 6. Best of both worlds
    7. 7. Use mature infrastructure andtechnology
    8. 8. Broaden student catchment
    9. 9. Traditional blended learning Real-time
    10. 10. Our blended learning
    11. 11. Number of programs with hybridcomponents (prior to May, 2012) 2009 2012
    12. 12. As of May, 2012Each UBC credit course has anonline course shell in LMS
    13. 13. How do we keep up with thedemand?
    14. 14. Our 4 guiding principles1. Enhance student engagement
    15. 15. 2. Increase teaching & learning effectiveness as new technology becomes available
    16. 16. 3. Build general capacity
    17. 17. 4. Comply with Faculty of Education’s strategic plan: Deliver enriching and relevant programs that prepare students for educational practices within teaching professions and the community- at-large, and for educational leadership locally, nationally, and internationally. http://educ.ubc.ca/community/strategic-plan
    18. 18. With these guiding principles inmind, we use the ADDIE process.AnalysisDesignDevelopmentImplementationEvaluation
    19. 19. A D D I E• Who are the learners and what are their characteristics?• Is it feasible?• Environment scan of available technology
    20. 20. A D D I E• With this change, what is gained/lost in communication and relationships?
    21. 21. A D D I E• What kind of activities we can create and support?• How ready is an instructor to change his/her practice?
    22. 22. A D D I E• Figuring out the cost/logistics• Create prototype
    23. 23. A D D I E• What does the change bring to teaching and learning?• What kind of interaction/engagement we would like to achieve?
    24. 24. A D D I E• Construction of the environment• Realizing the limitations and opportunities and using the best choices
    25. 25. A D D I E• Training for students, instructors, and support staff• Gather information for best practices
    26. 26. A D D I E• Troubleshooting, but also observing and providing feedback and suggestions on class dynamics
    27. 27. A D D I E• Gather information for best practices.• When are they engaged the most?• What works?
    28. 28. A D D I E• Formative – tweak the delivery method as the course/program continues, the best set-up, the most compatible equipment depending on the instructor’s style, course content, activities.
    29. 29. A D D I E• Summative – end of course student surveys, interview with instructors, and with administrators: cost-benefit analysis
    30. 30. Lecture capture
    31. 31. Lecture capture
    32. 32. Lecture capture A D D I E• Minimal technical knowledge and learning curve• Captured the classroom dynamics
    33. 33. Lecture capture A D D I E• Minimal change to instructor’s practice• Minimal change to students’ study practice• Transcription is available
    34. 34. Lecture capture A D D I E• Unclear text• Long recording and post-editing• Live session means more chances of things “go wrong”• Long video clip, may result in cognitive overload
    35. 35. A D D I E• Lecture Capture• Synchronous learning
    36. 36. Lecture capture A D D I E?• Unclear text• Long recording and post-editing• Live session means more chances of things “go wrong”• Long video clip, may result in cognitive overload
    37. 37. Voice over PowerPoint
    38. 38. Voice over PowerPoint A D D I E• Content is editable• Content is high resolution• Content is in digestible chunks• Instructor is speaking directly to the viewers
    39. 39. Voice over PowerPoint A D D I E• Relies heavily on the the speaker’s ability to use the medium effectively• Can feel a bit sterile, and lacking the human elements
    40. 40. Voice over PowerPoint A D D I E• Content limited to whatever is on the PowerPoint slide
    41. 41. A D D I E• Lecture Capture• Synchronous learning
    42. 42. Voice over PowerPoint A D D I E?• Medium not used effectively• Content felt a bit sterile• Content limited to the Powerpoint slides
    43. 43. Screen capture lecture
    44. 44. Screen capture lecture A D D I E• Quick turn-around with minimal editing• The added visual gives the recordings a human touch
    45. 45. Screen capture lecture A D D I E• Build in breaks, discussion point prompts• Content can include websites, YouTube videos, or specialized software
    46. 46. Screen capture lecture A D D I E• Instructor can not easily interact with the content
    47. 47. A D D I E• Lecture Capture• Synchronous learning
    48. 48. Screen capture lecture A D D I E?• Can not interact with the content
    49. 49. SmartBoard lecture capture
    50. 50. SmartBoard lecture capture A D D I E• Maintaining the ability to modify content• Preserving the natural flow and movement of a face-to-face session
    51. 51. SmartBoard lecture capture A D D I E• Isolated learning with no direct feedback peer-peer/peer- instructor• Discussion is separated from the video content
    52. 52. A D D I E• Lecture Capture• Synchronous learning
    53. 53. SmartBoard lecture capture A D D I E?• Isolated learning• Discussion is separated from the video content
    54. 54. Collaborative annotation
    55. 55. Collaborative annotation A D D I E• Adds a social layer to the teaching/learning process• Discussion is integrated with the video• Platform is programmed to be mobile friendly
    56. 56. A D D I E
    57. 57. Collaborative annotation
    58. 58. Collaborative annotation 1 out of 17
    59. 59. Collaborative annotation A D D I E• Technology overload: Steep learning curve to using the platform
    60. 60. Collaborative annotation A D D I E• Suitability of the topic• Presenter’s style• Expectations of using the system
    61. 61. Where are we now?
    62. 62. As of May, 2012Each UBC credit course has anonline course shell in LMS
    63. 63. What’s next?What’s growingin your garden?Sharon.Hu@ubc.caNatasha.Boskic@ubc.ca

    ×