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Distributed learning at the university of saskatchewan

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  • 1. Distributed Learning at the U of S: Planning for the Future Dan Pennock Frank Bulk Jim Greer Brad Wuetherick University of Saskatchewan October 18, COHERE 2012
  • 2. U of S Profile• Fit the profile - COHERE Report on Blended Learning – Faculty reluctance – Challenge to interact differently with content and each other – Finite resources – Ad hoc approach – Strategic direction/policy not explicitly defined for blended learning
  • 3. U of S Strength• But with lots of potential – Technical/online infrastructure and expertise – Online innovations – Matterhorn, Open Courseware, Sharestream – Curriculum Innovation Program – New emphasis for SOTL research – Development of the Distributed Learning Strategy
  • 4. Central Academic Support Units• ICT – Information and Communications Technology• eMAP – Educational Media Access and Production• CCDE – Centre for Continuing and Distance Education• GMCTE – Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching Effectiveness• College or department specific ICT units• Library – majority of procurement budget for e-reference material• Bookstore – involved in © support, ebook activity• University Learning Centre - academic student services• Student and Enrollment Services Division - non-academic student services
  • 5. Distance and Distributed Learning• Rich history of distance education – Correspondence courses (independent learning) – Televise/satellite delivery – Online courses• And approaches to distributed learning – Off campus sites for face to face – Video conferencing – Development of the blended cohort using lecture capture
  • 6. Regional Colleges• Northlands• Lakeland• North West• Cumberland• Great Plains• Carlton Trail• Parkland• Southeast
  • 7. Degree Credit ClassesRegistrations 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12Off Campus F2F 699 701 775Prince AlbertOff Campus F2F 663 671 697Regional CollegesTelevised 591 618 703Online 1489 2135 3008
  • 8. TEL – Technology Enhanced Learning• Provincially funded program from 2000 to 2009• High level goals for PSE’s from government – Advanced education and training in rural and northern communities – Enhance First Nations and Metis Peoples’ education and training – Develop and retain students, graduates and faculty for a knowledge based society – Develop Saskatchewan’s intellectual capital• Focus on online program options
  • 9. TEL – Technology Enhanced Learning• Benefits – Resources to develop UG and Graduate courses and programs – Faculty development (opportunity and supports) – Opportunity for Academic support units to work together• Challenges – Faculty time commitment in the development process – Maintenance
  • 10. TEL – Technology Enhanced Learning• Blended Initiatives – School of Physical Therapy – Curric Mapping and ePortfolio – Physics and Chemistry – online labs – College of Medicine – Microscopy project• Online Programs Developed – BA in Northern Studies – EPSE– Special Ed post degree specialization certificate – Master of International Trade – Master of Nursing – Master of Pubic Health (some courses still in development)
  • 11. Nursing – Distributed Undergrad Degree• NEPS - provincial partnership between U of S and SIAST• Province moved to a two provider model – competition• Deans approach to the government vision “Learn where you Live” to differentiate the U of S Program• Provincial Funding and major University Commitment
  • 12. Enrollments Ile-a-la-Crosse•15 students La Ronge•40 students Prince Albert•175 students Saskatoon•115 students Regina
  • 13. Delivery• Video conferencing• Laptops and webcams• Blackboard• Sharesteam• Student response system• Remote presence• Mobile possibilities
  • 14. Nursing – Initial challenges met• Redesigned curriculum• Building new relationships• Physical infrastructure• Technical infrastructure• Student supports• Cultural adjustment• Pushed the U of S forward wrt to Distributed Learning
  • 15. Blended CohortStudents at multiple sites (including Saskatoon campus); synchronous delivery by video-conferencingSupported by innovative use of remote tools (robots), on-line simulations etc. Program explicitly developed for multi-site delivery Students at Saskatoon campus also benefit from blended learning
  • 16. Blended Learning and Distance EducationTask: Develop a university-wide strategy for distributed learning; report by December 2012 COHERE report: Barriers to adoption of blended learning“absence of a clear institutional policy and strategic plan and appropriate leadership to support and sustain blended learning initiatives”
  • 17. Blended Learning and Distance EducationLinkage of blended learning to distance education allows access to university- level resources that otherwise would be difficult to access“increased revenue could be realized through the expansion of programs and students” (COHERE report)
  • 18. Blended Learning and Distance EducationBeyond revenue generation, distance education allows university participation by groups who have traditionally been under represented at U. of S. First Nations and Metis people, rural residents Limited family or community history of participation in post-secondary education “Dependent learners”
  • 19. How can blended learning be used most effectively in distance education? Dependent learners best served by face-to-face instruction Indian Teacher Education Program (ITEP) 4-year Bachelor of Education ProgramDelivered at nine First Nations communities in central Saskatchewan; also with three colleges
  • 20. How can blended learning be used most effectively in distance education? Dependent learners best served by face-to-face instruction Indian Teacher Education Program (ITEP) 4-year Bachelor of Education ProgramDelivered at nine First Nations communities in central Saskatchewan; also with three colleges Retention and graduation rates substantially higher than First Nations students at Saskatoon campus Difficult to sustain into the future
  • 21. What does face-to-face mean? 1)Teacher present in a single location (ITEP) 2)Video-conferencing to two or more sites (Nursing, Medicine) 3)Televised delivery, audio linkage between sites4)Lecture capture, asynchronous viewing by students, synchronous discussion forums All are bi-directional, but are they face-to-face (sensu stricto COHERE?)
  • 22. Where is the benefit of face-to-face for dependent learners lost? 1)Teacher present in a single location (ITEP) 2)Video-conferencing to two or more sites (Nursing, Medicine) 3)Televised delivery, audio linkage between sites4)Lecture capture, asynchronous viewing by students, synchronous discussion forums
  • 23. What are other benefits that blended learning can offer for dependent learners?
  • 24. Most successful examples of blended learning approaches at U. of S. are faculty-driven, bottom-up.How can a university-wide strategy (almost by definition top- down) encourage new faculty to adopt this approach?
  • 25. Thank You