Cnu 17 Sustainable Transit Networks Lieberman

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Cnu 17 Sustainable Transit Networks Lieberman

  1. 1. What we’ll cover • Types of transit networks and their attributes • Transit networks and placemaking • Interaction between roadway networks and transit networks
  2. 2. What’s a transit network? Transit Network: the spatial configuration of the individual lines of a transit system
  3. 3. What’s a sustainable transit network? 1. Enabling: people can travel without depending on private vehicles 2. Efficient: consumes least amount of resources for what you get 3. Fast: allows for timely travel 4. Affordable: can be maintained in all economic climates
  4. 4. Transit Network Typologies Amorphous Radial Grid Hub and Spoke
  5. 5. Transit Network Typologies
  6. 6. Amorphous Networks
  7. 7. Amorphous Networks
  8. 8. Amorphous Networks • Confusing • Difficult to coordinate transfers • Not a network that you’d ordinarily design • May be all that can be done on older street patterns
  9. 9. Radial Networks
  10. 10. Radial Networks
  11. 11. Radial Networks
  12. 12. Radial Networks
  13. 13. Radial Networks
  14. 14. Radial Networks • Ideal for serving one central activity center • Inflexible to changes in activity locations • Access any point on network with a single transfer • Can require out-of-direction travel • Poor continuity on grid street systems
  15. 15. Grid Networks
  16. 16. Grid Networks
  17. 17. Grid Networks ¼ mile walk Spacing: 0.5 mile or less
  18. 18. Grid Networks Frequency: 12 minutes or less
  19. 19. Grid Networks • Ideal for area wide coverage • Needs high density to justify frequent service • Best suited to grid street networks • Greater likelihood of transfers • Not convenient in low-density areas
  20. 20. Hub and Spoke Networks
  21. 21. Hub and Spoke Networks
  22. 22. Hub and Spoke Networks
  23. 23. Hub and Spoke Networks
  24. 24. 95% 5% CBD
  25. 25. Hub and Spoke Networks • Ideal for serving many activity centers • Less frequent service can still be attractive • Relatively economical to operate • Timed transfers are essential • Transfer facilities should be of high quality
  26. 26. Transit Network Typologies Enabling Efficient to center Fast elsewhere Affordable
  27. 27. local bus rapid transit commuter rail
  28. 28. Transit Networks and Placemaking
  29. 29. Transit Networks and Placemaking Amorphous Radial Grid Hub and Spoke
  30. 30. Transit Networks and Placemaking bus line rail line CBD
  31. 31. Transit Networks and Placemaking 4 localities accessed directly TOD? CBD
  32. 32. Transit Networks and Placemaking 7 localities accessed directly TOD? CBD
  33. 33. Roadway vs. Transit Networks Most forms of transit – but not all –are dependent on the roadway network
  34. 34. Roadway vs. Transit Networks Surface transit needs roadways to access potential riders
  35. 35. Roadway vs. Transit Networks Potential riders need streets and sidewalks to access transit
  36. 36. Roadway vs. Transit Networks Connectivity and Density of the roadway network are critical to transit
  37. 37. Network Connectivity
  38. 38. Network Connectivity
  39. 39. Network Connectivity
  40. 40. Network Connectivity
  41. 41. Network Connectivity
  42. 42. Network Density 1/4 mile
  43. 43. Network Density
  44. 44. Network Density 1/2 mile
  45. 45. Conclusions • Networks are unseen; understand the big picture before tinkering with the details • Sustainable transit networks must be enabling, efficient, fast, and affordable
  46. 46. Conclusions • To serve one principle activity node: - Radial transit network is best • To serve many dispersed activity nodes:
  47. 47. Conclusions • To serve one principle activity node: - Radial transit network is best • To serve many dispersed activity nodes: – Grid: frequent transit service in dense areas with grid street system – Hub-and-Spoke: for most other situations
  48. 48. Conclusions • Connectivity: connected streets permit transit to reach riders and riders to reach transit • Density: streets suitable for transit service should be spaced every half mile to ensure an easy walk to transit
  49. 49. Conclusions • Intense activities should be located near a transit network’s points of confluence

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