• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
C N U 17    Sustainable  Transit  Networks
 

C N U 17 Sustainable Transit Networks

on

  • 1,715 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,715
Views on SlideShare
1,653
Embed Views
62

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
38
Comments
0

4 Embeds 62

http://www.cnu.org 38
http://drewcunningham.tumblr.com 20
http://www.slideshare.net 3
http://safe.tumblr.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    C N U 17    Sustainable  Transit  Networks C N U 17 Sustainable Transit Networks Presentation Transcript

    • What we’ll cover • Types of transit networks and their attributes • Transit networks and placemaking • Interaction between roadway networks and transit networks
    • What’s a transit network? Transit Network: the spatial configuration of the individual lines of a transit system
    • What’s a sustainable transit network?
    • What’s a sustainable transit network? • Enabling: people can travel without depending on private vehicles
    • What’s a sustainable transit network? • Enabling: people can travel without depending on private vehicles • Efficient: consumes least amount of resources for what you get
    • What’s a sustainable transit network? • Enabling: people can travel without depending on private vehicles • Efficient: consumes least amount of resources for what you get • Fast: allows for timely travel
    • What’s a sustainable transit network? • Enabling: people can travel without depending on private vehicles • Efficient: consumes least amount of resources for what you get • Fast: allows for timely travel • Affordable: can be maintained in all economic climates
    • Transit Network Typologies Amorphous Radial Grid Hub and Spoke
    • Transit Network Typologies
    • Amorphous Networks
    • Amorphous Networks
    • Amorphous Networks • Confusing • Difficult to coordinate transfers • Not a network that you’d ordinarily design • May be all that can be done on older street patterns
    • Radial Networks
    • Radial Networks
    • Radial Networks
    • Radial Networks
    • Radial Networks
    • Radial Networks
    • Radial Networks • Ideal for serving one central activity center • Inflexible to changes in activity locations • Access any point on network with a single transfer • Can require out-of-direction travel • Poor continuity on grid street systems
    • Grid Networks
    • Grid Networks
    • Grid Networks ¼ mile walk Spacing: 0.5 mile or less
    • Grid Networks Frequency: 12 minutes or less
    • Grid Networks • Ideal for area wide coverage • Needs high density to justify frequent service • Best suited to grid street networks • Greater likelihood of transfers • Not convenient in low-density areas
    • Hub and Spoke Networks
    • Hub and Spoke Networks
    • Hub and Spoke Networks
    • Hub and Spoke Networks
    • 95% 5% CBD
    • Hub and Spoke Networks • Ideal for serving many activity centers • Less frequent service can still be attractive • Relatively economical to operate • Timed transfers are essential • Transfer facilities should be of high quality
    • Transit Network Typologies Enabling Efficient to center Fast elsewhere Affordable
    • local bus rapid transit commuter rail
    • Transit Networks and Placemaking
    • Transit Networks and Placemaking Amorphous Radial Grid Hub and Spoke
    • Transit Networks and Placemaking Amorphous Radial Grid Hub and Spoke
    • Transit Networks and Placemaking bus line rail line CBD
    • Transit Networks and Placemaking 4 localities accessed directly TOD? CBD
    • Transit Networks and Placemaking 7 localities accessed directly TOD? CBD
    • Roadway vs. Transit Networks Most forms of transit – but not all –are dependent on the roadway network
    • Roadway vs. Transit Networks Surface transit needs roadways to access potential riders
    • Roadway vs. Transit Networks Potential riders need streets and sidewalks to access transit
    • Roadway vs. Transit Networks Connectivity and Density of the roadway network are critical to transit
    • Network Connectivity
    • Network Connectivity
    • Network Connectivity
    • Network Connectivity
    • Network Connectivity
    • Network Connectivity
    • Network Connectivity
    • Network Density 1/4 mile
    • Network Density
    • Network Density 1/2 mile
    • Conclusions • Networks are unseen; understand the big picture before tinkering with the details
    • Conclusions • Networks are unseen; understand the big picture before tinkering with the details • Sustainable transit networks must be enabling, efficient, fast, and affordable
    • Conclusions • To serve one principle activity node: - Radial transit network is best
    • Conclusions • To serve one principle activity node: - Radial transit network is best • To serve many dispersed activity nodes:
    • Conclusions • To serve one principle activity node: - Radial transit network is best • To serve many dispersed activity nodes: – Grid: frequent transit service in dense areas with grid street system
    • Conclusions • To serve one principle activity node: - Radial transit network is best • To serve many dispersed activity nodes: – Grid: frequent transit service in dense areas with grid street system – Hub-and-Spoke: for most other situations
    • Conclusions • Connectivity: connected streets permit transit to reach riders and riders to reach transit
    • Conclusions • Connectivity: connected streets permit transit to reach riders and riders to reach transit • Density: streets suitable for transit service should be spaced every half mile to ensure an easy walk to transit
    • Conclusions • Intense activities should be located near a transit network’s points of confluence