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  • Week one
  • May 2009 version (post convening)
  • Transcript

    • 1. the Problem of Learning in the Post-Course Era
      • Randy Bass,
      • Georgetown University
      MAALT-SEALLT Conference March 11,2010
    • 2. What’s the problem?
    • 3. Writing technologies Wikis blogs microblogging Social bookmarking Data visualization Video conferencing Social networking Virtual worlds and serious games Online chatrooms E-portfolios Digital storytelling Self-assessment practices Task-based instruction Non-linear learning Multiple modalities Authentic audience From static to dynamic learning learning environments perpetually in motion a deeper sense of cultural understanding and language learning
    • 4. Writing technologies Wikis blogs microblogging Social bookmarking Data visualization Video conferencing Social networking Virtual worlds and serious games Online chatrooms E-portfolios Digital storytelling Self-assessment practices Task-based instruction Non-linear learning Multiple modalities Authentic audience From static to dynamic learning learning environments perpetually in motion a deeper sense of cultural understanding and language learning
    • 5. Writing technologies Wikis blogs microblogging Social bookmarking Data visualization Video conferencing Social networking Virtual worlds and serious games Online chatrooms E-portfolios Digital storytelling Self-assessment practices Task-based instruction Non-linear learning Multiple modalities Authentic audience From static to dynamic learning learning environments perpetually in motion a deeper sense of cultural understanding and language learning
    • 6. Writing technologies Wikis blogs microblogging Social bookmarking Data visualization Video conferencing Social networking Virtual worlds and serious games Online chatrooms E-portfolios Digital storytelling Self-assessment practices Task-based instruction Non-linear learning Multiple modalities Authentic audience From static to dynamic learning learning environments perpetually in motion a deeper sense of cultural understanding and language learning
    • 7. The Post-Course Era
    • 8. “ You know. It was taught as a Gen Ed course and I took it as a Gen Ed course.” Georgetown student, end of first year, focus group: reflecting a particular course in which, he claimed, he was not asked to engage with the material.
    • 9. High Impact Practices (National Survey of Student Engagement--NSSE)
      • First-year seminars and experiences
      • Learning communities
      • Writing intensive courses
      • Collaborative assignments
      • Undergraduate research
      • Global learning/ study abroad
      • Internships
      • Capstone courses and projects
    • 10. High Impact Activities and Outcomes
      • High Impact Practices:
      • First-year seminars and experiences
      • Learning communities
      • Writing intensive courses
      • Collaborative assignments
      • Undergraduate research
      • Global learning/ study abroad
      • Internships
      • Capstone courses and projects
      • Outcomes associated with High impact practices
      • Attend to underlying meaning
      • Integrate and synthesize
      • Discern patterns
      • Apply knowledge in diverse situations
      • View issues from multiple perspectives
      • Gains in Skills, knowledge, practical competence , personal and social development
    • 11. High Impact Practices (National Survey of Student Engagement--NSSE)
      • First-year seminars and experiences
      • Learning communities
      • Writing intensive courses
      • Collaborative assignments
      • Undergraduate research
      • Global learning/ study abroad
      • Internships
      • Capstone courses and projects
    • 12. So, if high impact practices are largely in the extra curriculum (or co-curriculum), then where are the low-impact practices?
    • 13. formal curriculum = low-impact practices ? Are we then entering the “post-course era”? 2/16/10
    • 14. If the formal curriculum is not where the high impact experiences are then there are three options
      • (1) Make courses higher impact
      • (2) Create better connections between courses and the high impact experiences outside the formal curriculum
      • (3) Start shifting resources from from the formal curriculum to the high impact (experiential) curriculum
    • 15. All of the above…
    • 16. Range of responses courses designed as inquiry-based and problem-driven Using social tools at scale Design courses for depth and engagement (writing intensive, project-based, team-based, etc) 2/16/10
    • 17. Participatory Culture
      • Features of participatory culture
        • Low barriers to entry
        • Strong support for sharing one’s contributions
        • Informal mentorship, experienced to novice
        • Members feel a sense of connection to each other
        • Students feel a sense of ownership of what is being created
        • Strong collective sense that something is at stake
      How do we make classroom learning more like participatory culture? Jenkins, et. al., The Challege of Participatory Culture
    • 18. Six Characteristics of high impact practices AND features of participatory culture
      • Features of participatory culture ( on the Web )
        • Low barriers to entry
        • Strong support for sharing one’s contributions
        • Informal mentorship, experienced to novice
        • Members feel a sense of connection to each other
        • Students feel a sense of ownership of what is being created
        • Strong collective sense that something is at stake
      • High impact experiences ( co- curriculum )
      • Attend to underlying meaning
      • Integrate and synthesize
      • Discern patterns
      • Apply knowledge in diverse situations
      • View issues from multiple perspectives
      • Skills, knowledge, practical competence , personal and social development
      2/16/10
    • 19. Looking from the Web in… How do we make formal learning environments more like informal learning? How do we make classroom learning more like participatory culture?
    • 20. The Formal Curriculum Informal Learning Participatory culture High impact practices Experiential Co-curriculum 2/16/10
    • 21. the end of the course as a bounded experience
    • 22. John Seely Brown: Practice to Content content practice
    • 23. The Formal Curriculum Informal Learning Participatory culture High impact practices Experiential Co-curriculum 2/16/10
    • 24. Three Challenges
      • Intermediate processes (“thin slices” of practice)
      • Reflective judgment, uncertainty
      • Embodied learning
    • 25. Thin Slices Participatory learning + Web 2.0 tools Student work is in process, in practice—not just in summative work
    • 26. NOVICE MIRACLE EXPERT product product Connecting Intermediate Processes to Practice Bass & Elmendorf, 2009 2/16/10
    • 27. How can we better understand these intermediate processes? How might we design to foster and capture them? evidence of process Connecting Intermediate Processes to Practice LEARNING processes 2/16/10 NOVICE processes EXPERT practice LEARNING processes LEARNING processes
    • 28. “ Thin slices” of online discussion or blog Traces of collaborative practice Micro-reflections on the cutting room floor ePortfolio samples: drafts, reflections Connecting Intermediate Processes to Practice NOVICE processes LEARNING processes EXPERT practice evidence of Process LEARNING processes LEARNING processes
    • 29. #1: Social Pedagogies and a Large Lecture Course Foundations of Biology BIOL-103 1st year Biology course 250 students science majors & pre-meds Heidi Elmendorf, Georgetown University
    • 30.
      • Participatory learning
      • Course Design Elements
      • Readings & On-line Conversation
      • Class & Think-Pair-Share
      • Lab & Partnered Inquiry
      • Problem Sets & Group Effort around Authentic and Challenging Problems
      • Research Paper & Shared Steps
      • Exams & Room for Uncertainty
      Learning and Feedback from Multiple Perspectives Flexibility with knowledge in open-ended contexts Deepening Disciplinary Understanding Sense of Personal and Intellectual Significance Student Learning Goals (Students develop…) A Sense of Audience and Voice Social Pedagogies Heidi Elmendorf, Georgetown University
    • 31. Prof Elmendorf’s Instructions to her Students for the Discussion Board
      • Communicate about the reading. One of the best ways to learn something is to talk about it. Air your bafflement, express your wonder, ask your questions, try out a new idea of your own… And while I hope you will talk often about biology this semester with your classmates, I want to be sure you have an official forum for these conversations – and that you are rewarded for the effort you will expend having them.
    • 32. Holding Conversations
    • 33. Online Conversation
    • 34. Jose Feito, on the importance of “not knowing” “ The theme of not-knowing [has] emerged as a key factor in the maintenance of a truly collaborative intellectual community within the classroom. In order for a shared inquiry to proceed productively, the participants must be able to regularly acknowledge their lack of understanding, offer partial understandings, and collectively digest the resulting discourse. Not-knowing is characterized by a group’s ability to defer meaning, tolerate ambiguity, hold divergent perspectives, and postpone closure. In order to develop, it requires a relatively non-judgmental classroom atmosphere, but not an uncritical one.” Jose Feito, St. Mary’s University (Moraga, California, U.S.A.)
    • 35. Michael Smith & Ali Erkan, Ithaca College
      • Using Wiki’s to teach history
      • Students work in collaborative teams to write history wiki-texts on subjects that interest them in historical context
    • 36. Michael Smith & Ali Erkan, Ithaca College
    • 37.
      • Not just about knowledge to be acquired, but
      • Ways of thinking
      • Ways of acting (practice)
      • Ways of talking
      • A sense of identity
      Embodied Not just knowing, but the experience of knowing (and coming to know)
    • 38. Social Pedagogies and an Introductory Writing Class Writing, Invention, Media HUMW-011 1st year writing course 20 students Gen Ed Randy Bass, Georgetown University
    • 39. Humanities & Writing 011
      • First-year required writing course
      • Section theme: “Writing, Invention, Media”
      • Core concept: “writing is a social act”
      • Core theme: Changes modes of learning, the participatory culture of Web, and the nature of the University
    • 40. CORE Important Worthwhile Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, Understanding by Design What is worth knowing and doing? What is important to know and do? What is a core or enduring understanding?
    • 41. CORE Important Worthwhile Opening Day exercise: Writing in school? Writing on the Web? HUMW011: Writing, Invention, Media
    • 42. Core Values of Writing in School: Week One
    • 43. Core Important Worthwhile
    • 44. Core Understandings--writing in school (week one) Core Understandings--digital, Writing on the web (week one)
    • 45.  
    • 46.  
    • 47. Networked research group
    • 48. Networked research group Yahoo Pipes
    • 49. Networked research group
    • 50. Participatory Culture and Formal Learning Student team Student team Student team Shared course blog or teacher / tutor space Any mechanism for aggregating, feeding, filtering, tagging…
    • 51. Rajagopalan Balaji, Capstone Course in Engineering (University of Colorado) (Design competition) 70+ students 12 teams two projects Central RSS feed Team blogs Central RSS feed Team blogs Teacher watches, coaches (key source of capture for intermediate processes)
    • 52. thin slices of practice reflective judgment embodied learning If we are to connect courses to the “holistic self-portrait” of the learner, then we not only to link out but in.. Designing for the post-course era
    • 53. Learning and Feedback from Multiple Perspectives Flexibility with knowledge in open-ended contexts Deepening Disciplinary Understanding Sense of Personal and Intellectual Significance Student Learning Goals A Sense of Audience and Voice PRACTICE: Features of Participatory Process
      • Help students create markers of certainty and uncertainty
      • Provide opportunities for relearning
      • Design opportunities for meaningful reflection on Practice and integration of experience
    • 54. Tim Kastelle University of Queensland, “Successful Open Business Models” “Successful Open Business Models on the Web” (e.g. Journalism, Music) Aggregate Filter Connect Tim Kastelle
    • 55. Tim Kastelle, “Successful Open Business Models”
      • “Successful Open Business Models”
      • (higher education)
      • Aggregate
        • Information resources
      • Filter
        • Knowledge (what knowledge is worth knowing)
        • Scholarship (peer review)
        • Graduates (employability)
      • Connect
        • Ideas, experiences, people
    • 56. Shift in How We Add Value AGGREGATE FILTER CONNECT
    • 57. Shift in How We Add Value AGGREGATE FILTER CONNECT COURSE ERA POST-COURSE ERA
    • 58. Sir Ken Robinson, “How Education Kills Creativity” ted.com
    • 59. Sir Ken Robinson, “How Education Kills Creativity” ted.com “ What we need is a new conception of human ecology, one in which we start to reconstitute our conception of the richness of human capacity.”
    • 60. Randy Bass contact (for slides, follow up): [email_address]