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Randy Bass
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Randy Bass

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  • Week one
  • May 2009 version (post convening)
  • Transcript

    • 1. the Problem of Learning in the Post-Course Era <ul><li>Randy Bass, </li></ul><ul><li>Georgetown University </li></ul>MAALT-SEALLT Conference March 11,2010
    • 2. What’s the problem?
    • 3. Writing technologies Wikis blogs microblogging Social bookmarking Data visualization Video conferencing Social networking Virtual worlds and serious games Online chatrooms E-portfolios Digital storytelling Self-assessment practices Task-based instruction Non-linear learning Multiple modalities Authentic audience From static to dynamic learning learning environments perpetually in motion a deeper sense of cultural understanding and language learning
    • 4. Writing technologies Wikis blogs microblogging Social bookmarking Data visualization Video conferencing Social networking Virtual worlds and serious games Online chatrooms E-portfolios Digital storytelling Self-assessment practices Task-based instruction Non-linear learning Multiple modalities Authentic audience From static to dynamic learning learning environments perpetually in motion a deeper sense of cultural understanding and language learning
    • 5. Writing technologies Wikis blogs microblogging Social bookmarking Data visualization Video conferencing Social networking Virtual worlds and serious games Online chatrooms E-portfolios Digital storytelling Self-assessment practices Task-based instruction Non-linear learning Multiple modalities Authentic audience From static to dynamic learning learning environments perpetually in motion a deeper sense of cultural understanding and language learning
    • 6. Writing technologies Wikis blogs microblogging Social bookmarking Data visualization Video conferencing Social networking Virtual worlds and serious games Online chatrooms E-portfolios Digital storytelling Self-assessment practices Task-based instruction Non-linear learning Multiple modalities Authentic audience From static to dynamic learning learning environments perpetually in motion a deeper sense of cultural understanding and language learning
    • 7. The Post-Course Era
    • 8. “ You know. It was taught as a Gen Ed course and I took it as a Gen Ed course.” Georgetown student, end of first year, focus group: reflecting a particular course in which, he claimed, he was not asked to engage with the material.
    • 9. High Impact Practices (National Survey of Student Engagement--NSSE) <ul><li>First-year seminars and experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Learning communities </li></ul><ul><li>Writing intensive courses </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Undergraduate research </li></ul><ul><li>Global learning/ study abroad </li></ul><ul><li>Internships </li></ul><ul><li>Capstone courses and projects </li></ul>
    • 10. High Impact Activities and Outcomes <ul><li>High Impact Practices: </li></ul><ul><li>First-year seminars and experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Learning communities </li></ul><ul><li>Writing intensive courses </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Undergraduate research </li></ul><ul><li>Global learning/ study abroad </li></ul><ul><li>Internships </li></ul><ul><li>Capstone courses and projects </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes associated with High impact practices </li></ul><ul><li>Attend to underlying meaning </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate and synthesize </li></ul><ul><li>Discern patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Apply knowledge in diverse situations </li></ul><ul><li>View issues from multiple perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Gains in Skills, knowledge, practical competence , personal and social development </li></ul>
    • 11. High Impact Practices (National Survey of Student Engagement--NSSE) <ul><li>First-year seminars and experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Learning communities </li></ul><ul><li>Writing intensive courses </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Undergraduate research </li></ul><ul><li>Global learning/ study abroad </li></ul><ul><li>Internships </li></ul><ul><li>Capstone courses and projects </li></ul>
    • 12. So, if high impact practices are largely in the extra curriculum (or co-curriculum), then where are the low-impact practices?
    • 13. formal curriculum = low-impact practices ? Are we then entering the “post-course era”? 2/16/10
    • 14. If the formal curriculum is not where the high impact experiences are then there are three options <ul><li>(1) Make courses higher impact </li></ul><ul><li>(2) Create better connections between courses and the high impact experiences outside the formal curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>(3) Start shifting resources from from the formal curriculum to the high impact (experiential) curriculum </li></ul>
    • 15. All of the above…
    • 16. Range of responses courses designed as inquiry-based and problem-driven Using social tools at scale Design courses for depth and engagement (writing intensive, project-based, team-based, etc) 2/16/10
    • 17. Participatory Culture <ul><li>Features of participatory culture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low barriers to entry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strong support for sharing one’s contributions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal mentorship, experienced to novice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Members feel a sense of connection to each other </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students feel a sense of ownership of what is being created </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strong collective sense that something is at stake </li></ul></ul>How do we make classroom learning more like participatory culture? Jenkins, et. al., The Challege of Participatory Culture
    • 18. Six Characteristics of high impact practices AND features of participatory culture <ul><li>Features of participatory culture ( on the Web ) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low barriers to entry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strong support for sharing one’s contributions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal mentorship, experienced to novice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Members feel a sense of connection to each other </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students feel a sense of ownership of what is being created </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strong collective sense that something is at stake </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High impact experiences ( co- curriculum ) </li></ul><ul><li>Attend to underlying meaning </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate and synthesize </li></ul><ul><li>Discern patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Apply knowledge in diverse situations </li></ul><ul><li>View issues from multiple perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Skills, knowledge, practical competence , personal and social development </li></ul>2/16/10
    • 19. Looking from the Web in… How do we make formal learning environments more like informal learning? How do we make classroom learning more like participatory culture?
    • 20. The Formal Curriculum Informal Learning Participatory culture High impact practices Experiential Co-curriculum 2/16/10
    • 21. the end of the course as a bounded experience
    • 22. John Seely Brown: Practice to Content content practice
    • 23. The Formal Curriculum Informal Learning Participatory culture High impact practices Experiential Co-curriculum 2/16/10
    • 24. Three Challenges <ul><li>Intermediate processes (“thin slices” of practice) </li></ul><ul><li>Reflective judgment, uncertainty </li></ul><ul><li>Embodied learning </li></ul>
    • 25. Thin Slices Participatory learning + Web 2.0 tools Student work is in process, in practice—not just in summative work
    • 26. NOVICE MIRACLE EXPERT product product Connecting Intermediate Processes to Practice Bass & Elmendorf, 2009 2/16/10
    • 27. How can we better understand these intermediate processes? How might we design to foster and capture them? evidence of process Connecting Intermediate Processes to Practice LEARNING processes 2/16/10 NOVICE processes EXPERT practice LEARNING processes LEARNING processes
    • 28. “ Thin slices” of online discussion or blog Traces of collaborative practice Micro-reflections on the cutting room floor ePortfolio samples: drafts, reflections Connecting Intermediate Processes to Practice NOVICE processes LEARNING processes EXPERT practice evidence of Process LEARNING processes LEARNING processes
    • 29. #1: Social Pedagogies and a Large Lecture Course Foundations of Biology BIOL-103 1st year Biology course 250 students science majors & pre-meds Heidi Elmendorf, Georgetown University
    • 30. <ul><li>Participatory learning </li></ul><ul><li>Course Design Elements </li></ul><ul><li>Readings & On-line Conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Class & Think-Pair-Share </li></ul><ul><li>Lab & Partnered Inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Problem Sets & Group Effort around Authentic and Challenging Problems </li></ul><ul><li>Research Paper & Shared Steps </li></ul><ul><li>Exams & Room for Uncertainty </li></ul>Learning and Feedback from Multiple Perspectives Flexibility with knowledge in open-ended contexts Deepening Disciplinary Understanding Sense of Personal and Intellectual Significance Student Learning Goals (Students develop…) A Sense of Audience and Voice Social Pedagogies Heidi Elmendorf, Georgetown University
    • 31. Prof Elmendorf’s Instructions to her Students for the Discussion Board <ul><li>Communicate about the reading. One of the best ways to learn something is to talk about it. Air your bafflement, express your wonder, ask your questions, try out a new idea of your own… And while I hope you will talk often about biology this semester with your classmates, I want to be sure you have an official forum for these conversations – and that you are rewarded for the effort you will expend having them. </li></ul>
    • 32. Holding Conversations
    • 33. Online Conversation
    • 34. Jose Feito, on the importance of “not knowing” “ The theme of not-knowing [has] emerged as a key factor in the maintenance of a truly collaborative intellectual community within the classroom. In order for a shared inquiry to proceed productively, the participants must be able to regularly acknowledge their lack of understanding, offer partial understandings, and collectively digest the resulting discourse. Not-knowing is characterized by a group’s ability to defer meaning, tolerate ambiguity, hold divergent perspectives, and postpone closure. In order to develop, it requires a relatively non-judgmental classroom atmosphere, but not an uncritical one.” Jose Feito, St. Mary’s University (Moraga, California, U.S.A.)
    • 35. Michael Smith & Ali Erkan, Ithaca College <ul><li>Using Wiki’s to teach history </li></ul><ul><li>Students work in collaborative teams to write history wiki-texts on subjects that interest them in historical context </li></ul>
    • 36. Michael Smith & Ali Erkan, Ithaca College
    • 37. <ul><li>Not just about knowledge to be acquired, but </li></ul><ul><li>Ways of thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Ways of acting (practice) </li></ul><ul><li>Ways of talking </li></ul><ul><li>A sense of identity </li></ul>Embodied Not just knowing, but the experience of knowing (and coming to know)
    • 38. Social Pedagogies and an Introductory Writing Class Writing, Invention, Media HUMW-011 1st year writing course 20 students Gen Ed Randy Bass, Georgetown University
    • 39. Humanities & Writing 011 <ul><li>First-year required writing course </li></ul><ul><li>Section theme: “Writing, Invention, Media” </li></ul><ul><li>Core concept: “writing is a social act” </li></ul><ul><li>Core theme: Changes modes of learning, the participatory culture of Web, and the nature of the University </li></ul>
    • 40. CORE Important Worthwhile Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, Understanding by Design What is worth knowing and doing? What is important to know and do? What is a core or enduring understanding?
    • 41. CORE Important Worthwhile Opening Day exercise: Writing in school? Writing on the Web? HUMW011: Writing, Invention, Media
    • 42. Core Values of Writing in School: Week One
    • 43. Core Important Worthwhile
    • 44. Core Understandings--writing in school (week one) Core Understandings--digital, Writing on the web (week one)
    • 45.  
    • 46.  
    • 47. Networked research group
    • 48. Networked research group Yahoo Pipes
    • 49. Networked research group
    • 50. Participatory Culture and Formal Learning Student team Student team Student team Shared course blog or teacher / tutor space Any mechanism for aggregating, feeding, filtering, tagging…
    • 51. Rajagopalan Balaji, Capstone Course in Engineering (University of Colorado) (Design competition) 70+ students 12 teams two projects Central RSS feed Team blogs Central RSS feed Team blogs Teacher watches, coaches (key source of capture for intermediate processes)
    • 52. thin slices of practice reflective judgment embodied learning If we are to connect courses to the “holistic self-portrait” of the learner, then we not only to link out but in.. Designing for the post-course era
    • 53. Learning and Feedback from Multiple Perspectives Flexibility with knowledge in open-ended contexts Deepening Disciplinary Understanding Sense of Personal and Intellectual Significance Student Learning Goals A Sense of Audience and Voice PRACTICE: Features of Participatory Process <ul><li>Help students create markers of certainty and uncertainty </li></ul><ul><li>Provide opportunities for relearning </li></ul><ul><li>Design opportunities for meaningful reflection on Practice and integration of experience </li></ul>
    • 54. Tim Kastelle University of Queensland, “Successful Open Business Models” “Successful Open Business Models on the Web” (e.g. Journalism, Music) Aggregate Filter Connect Tim Kastelle
    • 55. Tim Kastelle, “Successful Open Business Models” <ul><li>“Successful Open Business Models” </li></ul><ul><li>(higher education) </li></ul><ul><li>Aggregate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Information resources </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Filter </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge (what knowledge is worth knowing) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scholarship (peer review) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Graduates (employability) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Connect </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ideas, experiences, people </li></ul></ul>
    • 56. Shift in How We Add Value AGGREGATE FILTER CONNECT
    • 57. Shift in How We Add Value AGGREGATE FILTER CONNECT COURSE ERA POST-COURSE ERA
    • 58. Sir Ken Robinson, “How Education Kills Creativity” ted.com
    • 59. Sir Ken Robinson, “How Education Kills Creativity” ted.com “ What we need is a new conception of human ecology, one in which we start to reconstitute our conception of the richness of human capacity.”
    • 60. Randy Bass contact (for slides, follow up): [email_address]

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