2013wk1

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  • Welcome and class attendanceTake attendanceCheck any discrepancies Expectations:Attend all the workshopsPrior email notification of absentees (within reason)Read the readings before the workshop, this will enable active participation in the activities etc.Common courtesy – early is on time, on time is late, late is just rudeMobile phones – silent please, if there is the need to take an important call (child care, family issues, doctor calls, the bank etc.) please inform me at the beginning of the need for this (I don’t need specifics) and take the call outsideMy aims:InteractiveStrategy based – i.e. useful for the classroom – I will try to model strategies or highlight classroom application throughout the workshops to give a practical purpose to the theory – reinforce that I am not, nor would not, treat any of you as students, rather I see you as future colleaguesIf I mention a strategy which you are unfamiliar with please let me know so I can explain
  • IntroductionsLots of different strategies for introductions in the classroom, e.g. human bingo, two truths and a tale, alliteration names etc.LearnitEverything is on Learnit – the aim is to be as paper-free as possible – however all written assignments must be submitted in hard copy (no soft copies will be accepted for marking)Learnit will continue to grow and develop as the unit progressesAll readings, unless otherwise stated are in pdf format – there are a couple of readings which are in hard copy in the library – I am currently investigating the possibility of putting those pages up on Learnitworkshop notes will also be put up on Learnit after the workshop – ideally I will be inserting them as a slideshare interactive rather than simply pdf, however there are problems with that feature so at the moment I will put links to my slideshare page for nowAny activities which we complete in the workshop which are appropriate for sharing on the Learnit page I will also put upAssessment 1 presentations will go on Learnit as a copy of the slides/handouts etc.Contact Timesemail is always best bet; if would like to see me I am available for appointments on Monday, Tuesday and Friday (if I am not in class) however it must be by arranged appointment as I don’t have an office. I have access to the sessional tutor rooms when I am on campus which are in the Education building at the far end of the cornerBreaks and breatherssuggest 15 min break and finish at 4:00ishSeems like not a great deal of break but there will be limited just talk and listen so shouldn’t be too boringUnit OutlineEntire unit outline including all assessment rubrics are available on LearnitIncludes topics for each week and readingsSupplementary documents for assessments also on LearnitFocus on the core learning outcomes for this unit
  • In my classroom practice I have always believed that it is vital for my students to know where they are headed – what they are expected to be able to know and do at the end of a module.I would put the learning outcomes up at the start of the module and decode with the students some of the underlying Big Questions of the learning outcomes.I would often use a jigsaw to have small groups simply focus on one outcome and then use a gallery walk to elaborate and then feed it all back.Throughout the module I would link back content to the learning outcomes, such as this activity you are completing today will help you with learning outcome 1 etc. – I always had my outcomes displayed in the roomNot going to do that today, but quickly TTYPA (turn to your partner and) discuss the learning outcomes and decide on 1 thing which excites you to learn about and 1 thing which you think will create cognitive challenge (i.e. not something you have a huge prior knowledge base)5 mins TTYPA5 mins feedbackFirst assessment will be directly linked to outcomes 1 & 4 (click for highlighting)
  • Go through assessments and rubrics1st tutorial presentation will be next week – obviously this group will be marked with the consideration that they are the fledgling groupHave a think and chat during the break and we will be concreting in the groups by the end of the session todayFor assessment 2 you need to have signed up for learning federation access – we will have a session (hopefully) in a lab to kick start your assessment in the coming weeks but it would be great if you could sign up before that session
  • Today’s three topics are essentially the umbrella topics of the entire unit. Without these three elements you cannot expect to cater for the needs of your adolescent students. Everything else in the unit happens under this umbrella. It is either a reaction to or informs the three aspects of the umbrella.In your tutorial presentations I expect that you attempt to relate the workshop topic back to this umbrella.As a reflective teacher, dedicated to differentiation, before any module I would engage in some sort of pre-test to gauge my students’ point of readiness. Now I can’t do that with you to the same extent but here is a couple of ways I could have done it. Each of these strategies I would normally collect to inform my practice and then use later in the module to gauge how we, my students and myself, are tracking in terms of knowledge/skills attained.
  • This is a modification of KWI, which is great as it allows for misconceptions to be expressed under think – great for students who might be anxious to get the right answer, students with perfectionist tendencies, or slow startersTTYPA Think and Puzzle5 mins for chat10 mins for feedback – add to document to be put on Learnit
  • There is a little trap with this model for lower ability students or students with no prior knowledge as to create a non-example requires a great deal of knowledge of the properties of the topic.TTYPA an example and non-example (if you can) of reflective practice
  • Carol-Ann Tomlinson – guru of differentiated instructionDifferentiation is NOT a set of strategies… it is a way of thinking about teaching and learningStrategies are tools to accomplish the goals of differentiated instruction.
  • Respectful tasks:In any classroom, it is critically important that the task we ask students to do is respectful – that it is challenging, interesting, and worth doing. In a differentiated classroom, students often work on different tasks simultaneously. The tasks may be adjusted for different readiness levels, interests, or learning preferences, but regardless of which task a student is assigned to (or selects) it should be respectful. If some students look like they are doing a task that is challenging, engaging, and thought-provoking to them while other students work on filling in a simplistic worksheet, the activities are not effectively differentiated and will affect how students perceive their status in the classroom.Teaching upQuite simply this means raising the ceiling for all students in your classIn a differentiated classroom, all students should be working at a level of complexity that is just above their individual comfort levels. By providing each student with reasonable levels of challenge and instructional scaffolding as needed, students learn that hard work results in successful growth. Tip: plan the most complex activity and then modify for students will a lower readiness lever – many people do the oppositeFlexible groupThis means that students work in a variety of arrangements – students may work in small groups with students of similar readiness, interest, or learning profile, in small groups with students of different readiness, interest, or learning profile,with a partner of similar readiness, interest, or learning profilewith a partner of different readiness, interest, or learning profileindividuallyas a whole classContinual assessmentThe differentiated classroom is characterised by continual assessment – assessment for learning and assessment of learning, that is formative and summative assessmentPre-testing is essential for identifying students’ point of readinessFormative assessment is used to shape your everyday teachingFormative assessment can include:exit cards questions for the day journal prompts observation one-on-one conversations with studentsEtc. all help in identifying when there is a need to re-teach something to certain students or to raise the challenge higher for some students. Building communityIn an effectively differentiated classroom, the teacher focuses on building a learning community where students feel safe, accepted, and supported. One where students treat one another with respect, help one another to be productive, and share in one another's successes. (All good teaching practice really)It is vital that a culture of acceptance of individual learning journeys is built within your classroomEveryone is ending up at the same place (meeting the learning outcomes of the module) but how each person gets there can be very different and that is ok – I often use the analogy of how students get to school each day to show how they all end up in the same place but may have come very different waysContentThe “what” of your teachingPre-testing will enable you to determine what needs to be taught in-depth, revised, not taught at all – this can vary between students in the differentiated classroom which reinforces the need for flexible groupingsProcessThis is the fun bit – the how. We will be building your toolbox of process strategies over the unit.
  • Quality curriculumYes we are governed by external bodies for our curriculum, WA curriculum or Australian National CurriculumBut when designing your classroom curriculum, that is the interpretation of the stated learning aspects or indicators, it is essential that we develop a quality curriculum – which means to plan with the end in mind.You must begin with clearly defining where you want students to go before thinking about how we want them to get there. What do we want them to Know, Understand, and be able to Do (KUD) as a result of the learning experience? You start with identifying the essential Understandings -- the concepts, principles, or big ideas of the unit topic. Understandings that are meaningful, intriguing, and thought provoking allow students to see the relevance of what they are studying to other subjects and to the world around them.Then you move onto the knowledge includes the key facts (names, dates, places, etc..), vocabulary, and examples that you want students to know. In isolation, this knowledge is easily forgotten. But when linked with the Understandings, the knowledge items help students to uncover and make sense of the Understandings.Finally do: this might include basic skills such as literacy and numeracy, thinking skills such as reasoning and synthesizing, discipline-based skills such as graphing, planning skills such as goal-setting and project planning, and social skills such as collaboration and leadership.
  • Teaching upQuite simply this means raising the ceiling for all students in your classIn a differentiated classroom, all students should be working at a level of complexity that is just above their individual comfort levels. By providing each student with reasonable levels of challenge and instructional scaffolding as needed, students learn that hard work results in successful growth. Tip: plan the most complex activity and then modify for students will a lower readiness lever – many people do the oppositeFlexible groupThis means that students work in a variety of arrangements – students may work in small groups with students of similar readiness, interest, or learning profile, in small groups with students of different readiness, interest, or learning profile,with a partner of similar readiness, interest, or learning profilewith a partner of different readiness, interest, or learning profileindividuallyas a whole classBuilding communityIn an effectively differentiated classroom, the teacher focuses on building a learning community where students feel safe, accepted, and supported. One where students treat one another with respect, help one another to be productive, and share in one another's successes. (All good teaching practice really)It is vital that a culture of acceptance of individual learning journeys is built within your classroomEveryone is ending up at the same place (meeting the learning outcomes of the module) but how each person gets there can be very different and that is ok – I often use the analogy of how students get to school each day to show how they all end up in the same place but may have come very different waysContentThe “what” of your teachingPre-testing will enable you to determine what needs to be taught in-depth, revised, not taught at all – this can vary between students in the differentiated classroom which reinforces the need for flexible groupingsProcessThis is the fun bit – the how. We will be building your toolbox of process strategies over the unit.
  • Continual assessmentThe differentiated classroom is characterised by continual assessment – assessment for learning and assessment of learning, that is formative and summative assessmentPre-testing is essential for identifying students’ point of readinessFormative assessment is used to shape your everyday teachingFormative assessment can include:exit cards questions for the day journal prompts observation one-on-one conversations with studentsEtc. all help in identifying when there is a need to re-teach something to certain students or to raise the challenge higher for some students.
  • Building communityIn an effectively differentiated classroom, the teacher focuses on building a learning community where students feel safe, accepted, and supported. One where students treat one another with respect, help one another to be productive, and share in one another's successes. (All good teaching practice really)It is vital that a culture of acceptance of individual learning journeys is built within your classroomEveryone is ending up at the same place (meeting the learning outcomes of the module) but how each person gets there can be very different and that is ok – I often use the analogy of how students get to school each day to show how they all end up in the same place but may have come very different ways
  • This is the fun bit – how to make it different for your particular studentsContentThe “what” of your teachingPre-testing will enable you to determine what needs to be taught in-depth, revised, not taught at all – this can vary between students in the differentiated classroom which reinforces the need for flexible groupingsProcessThis is the fun bit – the how. We will be building your toolbox of process strategies over the unit.
  • Look back at your note about what you think differentiation is.Now using the exit strategy: I used to think …now I think, write a sentence about what you used to think differentiation is, and what you now think it is… as a teacher my learning would be in seeing the change in understanding looking, looking for any continued misconceptions, or any lack of development in understanding.
  • Conversations are getting more complex and more intrinsically linked with technology.Technology has moved away from the device to the interaction.Students are more connected than every before. There is a stronger sense of the individual and yet in a lot of ways there is a stronger sense of community. However the definition of community has changed.
  • Facebook? Twitter? LinkedIn? Scoopit?Twitter is one of the best professional learning tools you can have as an educator. Many great people to follow and gather their insights, links to articles, teaching strategies etc.Conferences all around the world have hash tags.
  • Wired: digital natives have spent their entire lived surrounded by and using computers, videogames, iPods, mobiles, email, IM, and social networking sitesWireless: digital natives thrive on the convenience of communicating electronically and wirelesslyAlways on: their conversations don’t “end”Mobile: school work is not just at school or in the home, its in a coffee shop, airport, park, etc.Instantaneous: digital natives are used to giving and receiving information immediately – anything is just a google awayImpatient: many are raised in an environment, and are conditioned for, instant gratification. They can get bored or frustrated is the information flow is poor or too slow.Expecting: have increased knowledge about the world and its possibilities and are now more expectant of their own opportunitiesOpen: many are more willing to share feelings and personal information – this is not always a good thing, especially in relation to cyber safetyFamous: the internet means that anyone could be one YouTube clip away from stardom, this is exciting and daunting for our students. There can be an added pressure of success and the need for “star power”Information saturated: there is an overload of information and we as teachers must help our students navigate this sea of informationExperimental: with the increased ability to alter and delete, there is a growing expectation of a “do over” which can encourage creativity and experimentation. Again as teachers we need to reiterate the need for some things to be done to the best of ones ability first time.Participatory: the collaborative abilities of the digital world are such that many digital natives are growing up with a strong sense of sharing and delegating. These skills do need to be taught in the classroom and refined.Empowered: digital natives are encouraged to pursue happiness, follow their dreams and embrace individuality. What draw backs could this have in the classroom?Global: are growing up in a world that is increasingly connected, accessible, interactive and open. Just ask a class where they went on holidays…it will surprise you how many have been overseas.
  • The world that we live in and the students which it is producing require an educational paradigm shift
  • This animate was adapted from a talk given at the RSA by Sir Ken Robinson, world-renowned education and creativity expert. This is just a short excerpt.6:22 – 7:39
  • Now fill in the exploreCan draw a line under the thinks and the puzzles and enter what you now think you know, and what puzzles you now have. The idea would be to be able to cross out some of the puzzles.
  • Tie it all togetherKnowledge of 21st century learners and learning is vital to understanding the students in your classroom.Understanding the students in your classroom is vital to differentiated instruction.Reflective practice enables you to check your students' growth and understanding, and enables you to question what is/is not working in your classroom to engage and essentially teach your students, which is vital to the differentiation process.
  • unconscious incompetence - in which we are unaware of what we can'tdo or don't know;• conscious incompetence - in which we become aware of our development needs and start to do something about them;• conscious competence - where we are using our new skills and knowledge, but watching and monitoring ourselves;• unconscious competence - the skills become 'second nature'.BUT SUCCESS IN TEACHING REQUIRES US TO ALWAYS CHALLENGE AND DEVELOP OUR PRACTICE BY REGULAR REFLECTION AND REVIEWReflective practice is central to the National Teacher Standards so should become central to your general everyday practice as a teacher.
  • 2013wk1

    1. 1. ED3222/4222Teaching and Learning Strategies for Adolescents Catherine Flanigan Catherine.Flanigan@nd.edu.au 1:30pm – 4:30pm ND36/103
    2. 2. Administration Blackboard Contact times Breaks and breathers Unit Outline Assessments Introductions  Wiki  6 word memoir  Popcorn
    3. 3. 21st Century learners TPACKCooperative learning HOTS Habits of Mind Bloom’sModels for differentiation MI ICT Brain based learning
    4. 4. Brainstorm - Differentiation  Does give opportunity to see any misconceptions Differentiation  Downside is that brainstorming can be an overused strategy which may not get the best information from your students Note down what you think differentiation is
    5. 5. 21st Century Learning Think/Puzzle/Explore
    6. 6. Frayer Model – ReflectivePractice Facts or My definition Characteristics Reflective Practice Examples Non-examples
    7. 7. Differentiation – a video interlude
    8. 8. Quality Curriculum Know  Understand  Do  Facts, names, dates,  Essential truths places, information that give meaning  Skills (basic skills, to the topic skills of the  States and territories  Stated as a full discipline, skills of of Australia sentence independence,  Prime Minister of  Begin with, “I social skills, skills Australia want students to of production)  Federation understand THAT…” (not  Verbs or phrases  Multiplication tables HOW… or (not the whole  States of matter WHY… or activity)  Narrative structure WHAT)  Multiplication is  Analyse another way to  Solve a problem to do addition  People migrate to find perimeter meet basic needs  Write a well  All cultures supported argument contain the same elements  Contribute to the  Voice reflects the success of a group author or team  Use graphics to represent data
    9. 9. Continual Assessment
    10. 10. Break http://www.online-stopwatch.com/candle- timer/full-screen/ Formulate any questions about differentiation Chat with colleagues about groups for presentations
    11. 11. 21st Centurylearners
    12. 12. 21st Century Learners Shhh/Share 1. Pick a column 2. Write or think silently 3. Be ready to share when time is called Write a definition Explain to a first Develop a of “the digital age” year BEd student metaphor, you feel clarifies what the digital analogy, or visual its key element, age is in terms of symbol that you principles and what it would look thinks represents ways it can effect like in the and clarifies teaching. classroom. what’s important to understand about the digital age.
    13. 13. 21st Century Learning Our values and norms in education are constantly being challenged by a shifting landscape of media and communications Internet landscapes include:  Media  Social  Mobile  Real time
    14. 14. Social media
    15. 15. What would education look like ifit resembled the culture in whichwe now live?
    16. 16. Life outside the classroom The world is “always on” Interaction is expected It is a social world Experiences are highly customised The world is increasingly digital There is a sense of being constantly connected Almost instant access to a vast range of things There has been a shift in the way we consume – we are now also producers
    17. 17. Digital Natives are: Wired  Information saturated Wireless  Experimental Always on  Participatory Mobile  Empowered Instantaneous  Global Impatient Expecting Open Famous
    18. 18. But! There is still varying degrees of access to digital technologies.
    19. 19. A Shift in the Education Paradigm
    20. 20. 21st Century Education Requires a:  Rethinking of the who, what, where and when of learning  Movement from prescriptive to connective practices  Rethinking of the delivery and distribution of learning  Rethinking of who participates in the learning process  Embracing of diverse learning spaces
    21. 21. Warning! This does not mean simply increasing ICT usage in your lessons
    22. 22. 21st Century Learning Think/Puzzle/Explore
    23. 23. Break http://www.online-stopwatch.com/candle- timer/full-screen/ Formulate any questions about 21st century learning Chat with colleagues about groups for presentations
    24. 24. Group presentation organisation
    25. 25. 21st Centurylearners
    26. 26. Reflective Practice is Deliberate Purposeful Structured About linking theory and practice To do with learning About change and development
    27. 27. Unconscious Conscious Conscious Unconsciousincompetence incompetence competence competence
    28. 28. The model I use What happened?What? What did I see/do? How did I feel at the time?So What? What were the effects of what I did (or didn’t do) on the teaching and learning in my classroom? What are the implications of what INow What? have described and analysed? How can I modify my practice?
    29. 29. Reflection and Differentiation What do you think is the role of reflection in differentiated instruction?
    30. 30. Reflection and Differentiation Reflection enables the  Differentiation is process of modifying adapting the or adapting the curriculum or lesson curriculum or lesson content, process, content, process, product and product and classroom classroom environment to environment to students’ needs, students’ needs, interest and learning interest and learning styles and requires a styles reflective engagement with teachers’ practical knowledge
    31. 31. 3-2-1 Three things which you learnt today. Two questions you still have. One thing which resonated with you and will remain with you long after this unit.

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