Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
CME Group 2012 Annual Report
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

CME Group 2012 Annual Report

  • 742 views
Published

 

Published in Economy & Finance
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
742
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Power of Risk Management2012 Annual Report
  • 2. 09 10 1108 12TOTAL CONTRACT VOLUME(in millions of round turn trades)TOTAL REVENUES(in millions of dollars)OPERATING MARGIN(in percentages)NET INCOMEATTRIBUTABLE TO CME GROUP1(in millions of dollars)09 10 1108 122,8903,3872,9782,5853,07809 10 1108 122,9152,5612,6133,0043,28109 10 1108 1262616162589511,812896826715¹2011 results include a $646 million non-cash benefit from a tax adjustment primarily due to a revaluation of our deferred tax liabilities.²Amounts exclude cash performance bonds and guaranty fund contributions.n.m. not meaningful All references to volume, notional value and rate per contract information in the text of this documentexclude our IRS, CDS, KCBT, CME Clearing Europe, TRAKRS and Swapstream contracts.See the 2012 Annual Report on Form 10-K for the companys forward-looking statements.Financial Highlightsyear ended or at December 31(in millions, except per share data and notional value) 2012 2011 ChangeIncome Statement DataTotal revenues $ 2,915 $ 3,281 -11%Operating income 1,692 2,021 -16Income before income taxes 1,693 1,936 -13Net income attributable to CME Group ¹ 896 1,812 -51Earnings per share: Basic ¹ $ 2.71 $ 5.45 -50% Diluted ¹ 2.70 5.43 -50Balance Sheet DataCurrent assets² $ 2,133 $ 1,612 32%Total assets² 32,278 31,425 3Current liabilities² 1,032 281 n.m.Total liabilities² 10,773 9,803 10CME Group shareholders’ equity 21,419 21,552 -1Other DataTotal contract volume (round turn trades) 2,890 3,387 -15%Total electronic volume (round turn trades) 2,464 2,860 -14Open interest at year end (contracts) 70 78 -11Notional value of trading volume (in trillions) $ 806 $ 1,068 -25
  • 3. At CME Group, we believe that risk management empowerscustomers to move ahead regardless of economic and geo-political changes around the world. The year 2012 presentedfurther opportunities to deliver on that principle. As globalmarkets evolved, we took a number of bold new steps to ad-dressthe needs of existing and potential clients in the UnitedStates, Europe, Asia and Latin America. With our expandedglobal presence and increasing scale, we are providing evenmore ways to manage risk – giving businesses, institutionsand individuals the power to advance with confidence in aconstantly shifting marketplace.
  • 4. If there is one thing that stands out asbusinesses begin to emerge from a dif-ficult economic environment globally,it’s that risk management is more im-portant than ever. Our focus has been toexpand ways to help customers world-wide succeed in handling their evolvingneeds as the demands of competitionand regulation intensify.Total company volume in 2012 wasnearly 3 billion contracts traded, whichgenerated more than $1.2 billion in cashfromoperations.Reflectingthisstrength,and consistent with the principles guid-ing our capital structure, we raised theregular quarterly dividend 59 percentin 2012. We increased our payout targetfrom approximately 35 percent to ap-proximately50percentoftheprioryear’scash earnings.During 2012, we returned $1.2 billionto our shareholders, representing anaggregate dividend yield of nearly 7 per-cent. This included an annual variabledividend of approximately $430 millionbased on 2012 results, which was accel-erated from first-quarter 2013 due touncertainty surrounding the future taxtreatment of dividends.As part of our global strategy, we an-nounced plans to launch a new London-based derivatives exchange in mid-2013to serve customers outside the UnitedStates. With more than 20 percent ofour electronic volume now originatingfrom Europe, Asia and Latin America,havinganexchangethatcanleverageourEuropean clearing house will provide ad-ditional opportunities to serve our grow-ing non-U.S. customer base.terrence A. Duffy Executive Chairman and PresidentDearShareholders 
  • 5. Inaddition,weexpandedoureffortsinAsia by enhancing agreements with keypartners. This follows our global growthstrategy of serving local needs throughselective partnerships such as those wehave with other exchanges worldwide in-cludingBM&FBOVESPA,BursaMalaysia,theDubaiMercantileExchangeandBolsaMexicana de Valores.Inglobalagriculturalmarkets,partici-pants in both established and emergingeconomies depend on liquid, transparentrisk management tools for price discov-ery. Our acquisition of the Kansas CityBoard of Trade (KCBT) serves this pur-pose.ItcombinesKCBTHardRedWinterWheat products with our deep and liquidCBOTSoftRedWinterWheatfuturesandoptions markets to provide new tradingopportunities for market participantsaround the world.Turning to the regulatory front, wecontinue to work closely with key con-gressional committees as well as theCommodityFuturesTradingCommissionand other futures industry participantsto strengthen customer protections andensure the integrity of futures markets.Furthermore, we are well positionedto provide clearing services to the OTCmarket as the Dodd-Frank clearing man­date is implemented. I believe the com-bination of our OTC clearing offering andour unparalleled range of futures prod-ucts provides the most comprehensiverisk management solutions available.We now clear the seven major inter-estrateswapcurrencies.Inaddition,wereceived regulatory approval to imple-ment portfolio margining for all marketparticipants.In all our efforts, we are committed toenabling customers worldwide to furtherleverage the power of risk managementtomeettheirchangingneeds–whenever,wherever and however they want.We continued to advance our global growth strategyby empowering customers through targeted riskmanagement tools and advanced clearing solutionsthat address macroeconomic and regulatory changes.terrence A. DuffyExecutive Chairman and PresidentMarch 15, 2013
  • 6. Our offering of the broadest range ofproducts across all major asset classeswas instrumental in helping customersdeal with economic and geopolitical chal-lenges last year. Our interest rate and en-ergy products accounted for 20 percentand22percentof2012revenues,respec-tively. Equities (15 percent), market dataand information services (13 percent),agricultural commodities (13 percent),foreignexchange(6percent),andmetals(5 percent) rounded out revenue contri-butions, with the remaining 6 percentcoming from other sources.We also made significant progressacross several key areas. This includedlaunchingnewproducts,deepeningrela-tionships with our international strategicpartners, expanding our over-the-counter(OTC) clearing offering and solidifyingour position as a leader in index servicesandinformationproducts.Sofarin2013,we have seen higher volumes relative tolast year.Growing and Diversifying the CoreWesuccessfullycompletedtheacquisitionof the Kansas City Board of Trade, whichwill provide customers with greater capi-talefficiencies,newtradingopportunitiesand additional products to manage theirglobal wheat price risk. We also launchedCME Direct technology for online tradingofbothexchange-listedandOTCmarketsthrough a single application.We completed our joint venture withMcGraw-HilltocreateS&PDowJonesIn-dices LLC. As a result, we secured a long-term exclusive license on S&P futures,options and OTC swaps. This will furtherstrengthenourpositioninindexproductsand services and allow us to extend prod-uctdevelopmentandco-brandingacrossasset classes.Furthermore,wecompleteddevelop-ment of our co-location services, whichwent live in January 2012 and created anadditional revenue stream.Globalizing Our BusinessOur globalization strategy is based onserving the expanding needs of custom-ers in developing and emerging markets.As part of this effort, we launched a num-berofregionallyspecificproductsinclud-ing Black Sea Wheat and Chinese SteelRebarSwapFuturesaswellasU.S.DollarDenominated Ibovespa Futures, whichhelpusappealtoriskmanagementneedsunique to particular geographies.Our planned exchange in Europe,basedinLondon,isanimportantnextstepto meet the growing regional demandfrom our customers. The initial suite ofFX products will allow us to serve clientsin the $4-trillion-a-day OTC FX market,largely traded out of London, and we planto expand into additional asset classesover time.We also strengthened our internatio­nal partnerships, including implement-ing our cross-listing and cross-licensingarrangement with BM&FBOVESPA andincreasing our stake in the Dubai Mer-cantile Exchange to 50 percent to helpbuild a new benchmark for crude oil eastof Suez. In addition, we advanced ourefforts in China, including helping to fa-cilitate operational readiness of ChineseFuturesCommissionMerchants(FCMs),renewing our Memorandum of Under­standing (MOU) with the Shanghai Fu-tures Exchange and signing an MOU withthe Bank of China.We are pleased with improving conditions so far in2013, and will build on this momentum as we continueto globalize the business by giving customers aroundthe world even more ways to manage their risk andadvance in challenging times.to ourShareholders 
  • 7. Adding OTC OfferingsThe relative safety and soundness ofcentral counterparty clearing for OTCinstruments has become increasinglyimportant. As a result, we have workedclosely with our customers and clear-ing firms to provide a comprehensive,multi-asset class clearing solution thatoffers operational ease and capitalefficiencies when combined with listedfutures products.To build on this, we have added buy-and sell-side firms for OTC clearing andfinalized long-term OTC clearing agree-ments with major sell-side banks forclearing both interest rate swaps (IRS)and credit default swaps (CDS). In addi-tion,wereceivedapprovalfromtheCom-modity Futures Trading Commission forCME Repository Service as a swaps datarepositoryforIRS,CDS,agriculturalcom-modities and FX asset classes.We also launched Deliverable InterestRate Swap Futures with strong supportfrom market participants. This productfills an important gap in the rates marketandbenefitsclientsbycombiningtheeco-nomic exposure of an interest rate swapwith the margin and liquidity benefitsof a futures contract. In addition, we areproviding portfolio margining to clearingmembers and customers based on riskoffsets between OTC IRS positions andEurodollar/Treasury futures positions.Achieving Operational ExcellenceOur best practices in clearing servicesprompted Risk Magazine to name CMEClearing as “Clearing House of the Year”inthemagazine’s2013RiskAwards.Thisachieve­ment, based on customer feed-back, validated the efforts of our globalteam to develop the most efficient OTCclearing solution available.We also completed significant en-hancements to the CME Globex electron-ic trading platform, which increased thecapacity,consistencyandpredictabilityof our system.Looking ahead, we will build on thepositive momentum so far in 2013 andcontinue to globalize the business toposition CME Group for success overthe long term.phupinder S. gillChief Executive OfficerMarch 15, 2013phupinder S. gill Chief Executive Officer
  • 8. 1662519277 2012136272126720111662519277 2012132670.921.920.921.1209 10 1108 12(in dollars per share)DIVIDEND PAYOUT3.7009 10 1108 12AVERAGE DAILY ELECTRONICTRADING VOLUME(in thousands)(in trillions of dollars)NOTIONAL VALUEAVERAGE DAILYTRADING VOLUME(in thousands)09 10 1108 1209 10 1108 1211,42312,77510,25812,16713,43911,3509,73910,1808,29010,1201,0688061,2278139940.921.920.921.1209 10 1108 12(in dollars per share)DIVIDEND PAYOUT3.70RONICE(in trillions of dollars)NOTIONAL VALUE09 10 1108 121,0688061,227813994Interest RatesEquitiesEnergyForeign ExchangeAgricultural CommoditiesMetalsPRODUCT LINE REVENUES(as a percentage of total clearing and transaction fees)1362721267201212627212772011Company Achievements in 2012• Traded nearly 3 billion contracts worth approximately $1 quadrillion in notional value.• Returned $1.2 billion of dividends to shareholders.• Completed acquisition of Kansas City Board of Trade.• Completed joint venture to create S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC.• Announced plans to create London-based derivatives exchange, CME Europe.• Launched regionally specific products in Europe, Asia and Latin America.• Enhanced over-the-counter clearing offering, attracting new participants while providingadditional choice through Deliverable Interest Rate Swap Futures.• Strengthened strategic partnerships with leading global exchanges including BM&FBOVESPA,Bolsa Mexicana de Valores, Bursa Malaysia and Dubai Mercantile Exchange and expanded orestablished memoranda of understanding with Shanghai Futures Exchange and Bank of China.
  • 9. UNITED STATESSECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSIONWASHINGTON, D.C. 20549FORM 10-K(Mark One)È ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2012OR‘ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF1934Commission File Number 001-31553CME GROUP INC.(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)Delaware 36-4459170(State or Other Jurisdiction ofIncorporation or Organization)(IRS EmployerIdentification No.)20 South Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60606(Address of Principal Executive Offices) (Zip Code)Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (312) 930-1000Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:Title Of Each Class Name Of Each Exchange On Which RegisteredClass A Common Stock $0.01 par value NASDAQ GLOBAL SELECT MARKETSecurities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: Class B common stock, Class B-1, $0.01 par value; Class B common stock, Class B-2, $0.01par value; Class B common stock, Class B-3, $0.01 par value; and Class B common stock, Class B-4, $0.01 par value.Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes È No ‘Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ‘ No ÈIndicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Actof 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject tosuch filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes È No ‘Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data Filerequired to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for suchshorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes È No ‘Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not containedherein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in PartIII of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ÈIndicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. Seedefinitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:Large accelerated filer È Accelerated filer ‘Non-accelerated filer ‘ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company) Smaller reporting company ‘Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ‘ No ÈThe aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 29 2012, was approximately $17.7 billion (basedon the closing price per share of CME Group Inc. Class A common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market (NASDAQ) on such date). Thenumber of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock as of February 13, 2013 was as follows: 333,577,524 shares ofClass A common stock, $0.01 par value; 625 shares of Class B common stock, Class B-1, $0.01 par value; 813 shares of Class B common stock,Class B-2, $0.01 par value; 1,287 shares of Class B common stock, Class B-3, $0.01 par value; and 413 shares of Class B common stock, Class B-4,$0.01 par value.DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:Documents Form 10-K ReferencePortions of the CME Group Inc.’s Proxy Statement for the2013 Annual Meeting of ShareholdersPart III
  • 10. CME GROUP INC.ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-KINDEXPagePART I. 1Item 1. Business 2Item 1A. Risk Factors 16Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 31Item 2. Properties 31Item 3. Legal Proceedings 32Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 32PART II. 32Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases ofEquity Securities 32Item 6. Selected Financial Data 35Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 36Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 58Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 64Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 100Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 100Item 9B. Other Information 103PART III. 103Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 103Item 11. Executive Compensation 103Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related ShareholderMatters 103Item 13. Certain Relationships, Related Transactions and Director Independence 104Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services 104PART IV. 105Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules 105Signatures 112
  • 11. PART ICertain TermsAll references to “options” or “options contracts” inthe text of this document refer to options on futurescontracts.Unless otherwise indicated, references to CMEGroup Inc. (CME Group) products include referencesto exchange-traded products on one of its regulatedexchanges: Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.(CME), Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, Inc.(CBOT), New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc.(NYMEX), Commodity Exchange, Inc. (COMEX)and The Board of Trade of Kansas City, Missouri,Inc. (KCBT). Products listed on these exchanges aresubject to the rules and regulations of the particularexchange and the applicable rulebook should beconsulted. Unless otherwise indicated, references toNYMEX include its subsidiary, COMEX.Further information about CME Group and itsproducts can be found at http://www.cmegroup.com.Information made available on our Web site does notconstitute a part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.Information about Contract Volume and AverageRate per ContractAll amounts regarding contract volume and averagerate per contract exclude our TRAKRS, Swapstream,credit default swaps, interest rate swaps and CMEClearing Europe contracts.Trademark InformationCME Group is a trademark of CME Group Inc. TheGlobe logo, CME, Chicago Mercantile Exchange,Globex, E-mini, Green Exchange, The GreenExchange and Design, and GreenX are trademarks ofChicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. CBOT andChicago Board of Trade are trademarks of Board ofTrade of the City of Chicago, Inc. NYMEX, NewYork Mercantile Exchange and ClearPort aretrademarks of New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc.COMEX is a trademark of Commodity Exchange,Inc. KCBT and Kansas City Board of Trade aretrademarks of The Board of Trade of Kansas City,Missouri, Inc. Dow Jones, Dow Jones IndustrialAverage, S&P 500, and S&P are service and/ortrademarks of Dow Jones Trademark Holdings LLC,Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC and S&P/Dow Jones Indices LLC, as the case may be, andhave been licensed for use by Chicago MercantileExchange Inc. All other trademarks are the propertyof their respective owners.FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTSFrom time to time, in this Annual Report onForm 10-K as well as in other written reports andverbal statements, we discuss our expectationsregarding future performance. These forward-lookingstatements are identified by their use of terms andphrases such as “believe,” “anticipate,” “could,”“estimate,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “expect” andsimilar expressions, including references toassumptions. These forward-looking statements arebased on currently available competitive, financial andeconomic data, current expectations, estimates,forecasts and projections about the industries in whichwe operate and management’s beliefs andassumptions. These statements are not guarantees offuture performance and involve risks, uncertainties andassumptions that are difficult to predict. Therefore,actual outcomes and results may differ materially fromwhat is expressed or implied in any forward-lookingstatements. We want to caution you not to place unduereliance on any forward-looking statements. Weundertake no obligation to publicly update anyforward-looking statements, whether as a result of newinformation, future events or otherwise. Among thefactors that might affect our performance are:• increasing competition by foreign anddomestic entities, including increasedcompetition from new entrants into ourmarkets and consolidation of existing entities;• our ability to keep pace with rapidtechnological developments, including ourability to complete the development,implementation and maintenance of theenhanced functionality required by ourcustomers while ensuring that suchtechnology is not vulnerable to security risks;• our ability to continue introducingcompetitive new products and services on atimely, cost-effective basis, including throughour electronic trading capabilities, and ourability to maintain the competitiveness of ourexisting products and services, including ourability to provide effective services to theover-the-counter market;1
  • 12. • our ability to adjust our fixed costs andexpenses if our revenues decline;• our ability to maintain existing customers,develop strategic relationships and attract newcustomers;• our ability to expand and offer our productsoutside the United States;• changes in domestic and non-U.S.regulations, including the impact of anychanges in domestic and foreign laws orgovernment policy with respect to ourindustry, including any changes to regulationsand policies that require increased financialand operational resources from us or ourcustomers;• the costs associated with protecting ourintellectual property rights and our ability tooperate our business without violating theintellectual property rights of others;• our ability to generate revenue from ourmarket data that may be reduced oreliminated by the growth of electronictrading, the state of the overall economy ordeclines in subscriptions;• changes in our rate per contract due to shiftsin the mix of the products traded, the tradingvenue and the mix of customers (whether thecustomer receives member or non-memberfees or participates in one of our variousincentive programs) and the impact of ourtiered pricing structure;• the ability of our financial safeguards packageto adequately protect us from the credit risksof clearing members;• the ability of our compliance and riskmanagement methods to effectively monitorand manage our risks, including our ability toprevent errors and misconduct and protect ourinfrastructure against security breaches andmisappropriation of our intellectual propertyassets;• changes in price levels and volatility in thederivatives markets and in underlying equity,foreign exchange, interest rate andcommodities markets;• economic, political and market conditions,including the volatility of the capital andcredit markets and the impact of economicconditions on the trading activity of ourcurrent and potential customers stemmingfrom the continued uncertainty in thefinancial markets;• our ability to accommodate increases incontract volume and order transaction trafficwithout failure or degradation of theperformance of our trading and clearingsystems;• our ability to execute our growth strategy andmaintain our growth effectively;• our ability to manage the risks and control thecosts associated with our acquisition,investment and alliance strategy;• our ability to continue to generate fundsand/or manage our indebtedness to allow usto continue to invest in our business;• industry and customer consolidation;• decreases in trading and clearing activity;• the imposition of a transaction tax or user feeon futures and options on futures transactionsand/or repeal of the 60/40 tax treatment ofsuch transactions;• the unfavorable resolution of material legalproceedings; and• the seasonality of the futures business.For a detailed discussion of these and other factorsthat might affect our performance, see Item 1A. ofthis Report beginning on page 16.ITEM 1. BUSINESSGENERAL DEVELOPMENT OF BUSINESSBuilding on the heritage of its futures exchanges(CME, CBOT, NYMEX, COMEX and KCBT), CMEGroup serves the risk management and investmentneeds of customers around the globe.CME was founded in 1898 as a not-for-profitcorporation. In 2000, CME demutualized and becamea shareholder-owned corporation. As a consequence,we adopted a for-profit approach to our business,including strategic initiatives aimed at optimizingcontract volume, efficiency and liquidity. In 2002,2
  • 13. Chicago Mercantile Exchange Holdings Inc. (CMEHoldings) completed its initial public offering of itsClass A common stock, which is listed on theNASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol“CME”. In 2007, CME Holdings merged with CBOTHoldings, Inc. and was renamed CME Group. Inconnection with the merger, we acquired the CBOTexchange. CBOT is a leading marketplace for tradingagricultural and U.S. Treasury futures as well asoptions on futures. In 2008, we merged withNYMEX Holdings and acquired NYMEX andCOMEX. On NYMEX, customers primarily tradeenergy futures and options contracts, includingcontracts for crude oil, natural gas, heating oil andgasoline, as well as over-the-counter energytransactions cleared through CME ClearPort. OnCOMEX, customers trade metal futures and optionscontracts, including contracts for gold, silver andcopper. We launched CME Clearing Europe in 2011to expand our European presence and further extendthe geographical reach of our clearing services. InJanuary 2012, we launched our co-location businesswhich is comprised of hosting, connectivity andcustomer support services providing furtherdiversification of our revenue stream. In June 2012,we established a new joint venture in whichMcGraw-Hill contributed its Standard & Poor’s(S&P) Indices business and we contributed a portionof our CME Group Index Services business to createS&P/Dow Jones Indices LLC (S&P/DJI), a globalleader in index services. Our CME Group IndexServices business was originally formed in 2010 aspart of a joint venture with Dow Jones & Company.As part of the formation of the joint venture in 2012,McGraw-Hill acquired our credit derivatives marketdata business. In September 2012, we applied to theUnited Kingdom’s Financial Services Authority(FSA) to create a London-based derivativesexchange. Pending regulatory approval as aRecognized Investment Exchange, CME EuropeLimited will initially begin trading foreign exchangefutures products and is expected to launch mid-2013.In November 2012, we acquired KCBT, which is theleading futures market for hard red winter wheat. In2012, we began operating a registered swap datarepository service that supports credit, interest rates,commodities and foreign exchange asset classes.Our futures and clearing business has historicallybeen subject to the extensive regulation of theCommodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC).As a result of our global operations, we are alsosubject to the rules and regulations of the localjurisdictions in which we conduct business. Thisincludes the FSA, based on our offering of variousCME Group products and services to Europeancustomers and the operation of CME ClearingEurope, and the Securities and ExchangeCommission (SEC), in connection with our offeringof clearing services for security-based swaps. In July2012, the Financial Stability Oversight Councildesignated our U.S. clearing house as a systemicallyimportant financial market utility which carries withit additional regulatory oversight of certain of ourrisk-management standards, clearing, and settlementactivities.Our principal executive offices are located at 20South Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60606, andour telephone number is 312-930-1000.FINANCIAL INFORMATION ABOUTINDUSTRY SEGMENTSThe company reports the results of its operations asone reporting segment primarily comprised of theCME, CBOT, NYMEX, COMEX and KCBTexchanges. The remaining operations do not meet thethresholds for reporting separate segmentinformation.NARRATIVE DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESSWe offer the widest range of global benchmarkproducts across all major asset classes based oninterest rates, equity indexes, foreign exchange,energy, agricultural commodities, metals, weatherand real estate. Our products include both exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivatives. We bringbuyers and sellers together through our CME Globexelectronic trading platform across the globe and ouropen outcry trading facilities in Chicago, New YorkCity and Kansas City, and provide hosting,connectivity and customer support for electronictrading through our co-location services. Our CMEDirect technology offers side-by-side trading ofexchange-listed and over-the-counter markets. Wealso provide clearing and settlement services forexchange-traded contracts, as well as for clearedover-the-counter derivatives transactions. Finally, weoffer a wide range of market data services —including live quotes, delayed quotes, market reportsand a comprehensive historical data service — andhave expanded into the index services business.3
  • 14. Our Competitive StrengthsCME Group offers a number of key differentiatingelements that set it apart from its competitors,including:Highly Liquid Markets—Our listed futures marketsprovide an effective forum for our customers tomanage their risk and meet their investment needsrelating to our markets. We believe that ourcustomers choose to trade on our centralized marketdue to its liquidity and price transparency. Marketliquidity—or the ability of a market to absorb theexecution of large purchases or sales quickly andefficiently, whereby the market recovers quicklyfollowing the execution of large orders—is key toattracting customers and contributing to a market’ssuccess.Most Diverse Product Line—Our products provide ameans for hedging, speculation and asset allocationrelating to the risks associated with, among otherthings, interest rate sensitive instruments, equityownership, changes in the value of foreign currency,credit risk and changes in the prices of agricultural,energy and metal commodities. The estimatedpercentage of clearing and transaction fees revenuecontributed by each product line is as follows:Product Line 2012 2011 2010Interest rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25% 27% 27%Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 21 21Foreign exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 7 7Agricultural commodity . . . . . . . . 16 13 12Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 26 27Metal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 6 6We believe that the breadth and diversity of ourproduct lines and the variety of their underlyingcontracts is beneficial to our overall performancewhen an individual product line or individual productis impacted by macroeconomic factors. Additionally,our asset classes contain various products designed toaddress differing risk management needs.Our products are traded through the CME Globexelectronic trading platform, our open outcry auctionmarkets in Chicago, New York City and Kansas City,and through privately negotiated transactions that weclear. The estimated percentage of clearing andtransaction fees revenue contributed by each tradingvenue is as follows:Trading Venue 2012 2011 2010Electronic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76% 75% 74%Open outcry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 9 10Privately negotiated . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5 5CME ClearPort (OTC) . . . . . . . . . 11 11 11Our products generate valuable informationregarding prices and trading activity. We distributeour market data over the CME market data platformdirectly to our electronic trading customers as part oftheir access to our markets, as well as to quotevendors who consolidate our market data with thatfrom other exchanges, other third-party dataproviders and news sources, and then resell theirconsolidated data. The estimated contributions of ourmarket data and information services products,excluding our index market data offerings, based onpercentage of total revenue over the last three years,were 12% in 2012, 10% in 2011 and 11% in 2010.In 2010, we expanded our market data offeringsthrough our joint venture with Dow Jones—CMEGroup Index Services—which further diversified ourrevenue streams. In June 2012, we established ournew joint venture with McGraw-Hill and contributeda portion of our CME Group Index Services businessto create S&P/DJI. We derived 2% of our revenuesfrom our index services business in 2012, 3% in 2011and 2% in 2010.Safety and Soundness of our Markets—Weunderstand the importance of ensuring that ourcustomers are able to manage and contain theirtrading risks. As the markets and the economy haveevolved, we have worked to adapt our clearingservices to meet the needs of our customers. Weapply robust risk management standards and enforceand facilitate applicable CFTC customer protectionstandards for exchange-traded products and clearedover-the-counter derivatives. Clearing member firmsare continually monitored and examined to assesstheir outstanding risk, capital adequacy andcompliance with customer protection rules andregulations. We utilize a combination of risk4
  • 15. management capabilities to assess our clearing firmsand their account exposure levels for all asset classes24 hours a day throughout the trading week. Our U.S.clearing house is operated within our CME exchange.We also operate a UK clearing house—CMEClearing Europe. In connection with our acquisitionof KCBT, we acquired its clearing house. We expectto complete the integration of the KCBT clearinghouse with our U.S. clearing house in April 2013.Our integrated clearing function is designed to ensurethe safety and soundness of our markets. Our clearingservices are designed to protect the financial integrityof our markets by serving as the counterparty toevery trade, becoming the buyer to each seller andthe seller to each buyer, and limiting credit risk. Theclearing house is responsible for settling tradingaccounts, clearing trades, collecting and maintainingperformance bond funds, regulating delivery andreporting trading data. CME Clearing marks openpositions to market at least twice a day, and requirespayment from clearing firms whose positions havelost value and makes payments to clearing firmswhose positions have gained value. For selectcleared-only markets, positions are marked-to-marketdaily, with the capacity to mark-to-market morefrequently as market conditions warrant. We alsooffer clearing services through CME ClearPort, acomprehensive set of flexible clearing services forthe global over-the-counter market backed by CMEClearing. See “Item 7A. Quantitative and QualitativeDisclosures About Market Risk,” beginning on page59 and “Item 1A. Risk Factors,” beginning on page16, for more information on our financial safeguardspackage and the associated credit risks related to ourclearing services.Superior Trading Technology and Distribution—We strive to provide the most flexible architecture interms of bringing new technology, innovations andsolutions to the market. Our CME Globex electronictrading platform is accessible on a global basis nearly24 hours a day throughout the trading week. In 2012,we launched the next generation of CME Globexreducing order entry and market data latencyvariability along with increasing capacity and costefficiency.Our platform offers:• certainty of execution;• vast capabilities to facilitate complex anddemanding trading;• direct market access;• fairness, price transparency and anonymity;and• global distribution, including connectionthrough high-speed internationaltelecommunications hubs in key financialcenters in Europe, Asia and Latin America,and hosting or global order routing to ourglobal partner exchanges.In January 2012, we launched our service offeringsfor co-location at our data center facility, whichhouses our trading match engines for all productstraded on the CME Globex platform. The serviceprovides the lowest latency connection for ourcustomers. The offering is made available to allcustomers on equal terms. We derived 2% of ourrevenues from our co-location business in 2012. Wealso enhanced our trading technology with the launchof CME Direct, which offers on-line trading of bothexchange-traded and over-the-counter markets. In2012, 84% of our contract volume was conductedelectronically.Our Strategic InitiativesThe following is a description of our strategicinitiatives:Leading Core Business Innovation—We continue toenhance our customer relations to allow us to furthercross-sell our products, expand on the strength of ourexisting benchmark products and launch newproducts. Over the last three years, our key newproduct launches included the Ultra-long BondTreasury futures and options, Weekly Treasuryoptions and a deliverable interest rate swap futuresproduct. During the year, we also completed theacquisition of the KCBT, providing customers withgreater capital efficiencies, new trading opportunitiesand additional products to manage their global wheatprice risk. We also acquired the Green Exchange,LLC and integrated its products into our energyproduct suite which adds to our energy complex andexpands our reach into the environmental market.5
  • 16. Globalizing our Company and our Business—Ourgoal is to continue to expand and diversify ourcustomer base worldwide and offer customers aroundthe world the most broadly diversified portfolio ofbenchmark products. We expanded our product suitewith the launch of a number of regionally specificproducts, including Black Sea Wheat, deliverablerenminbi futures and Chinese Steel Rebar swapfutures, which help us appeal to risk managementneeds unique to a particular geography. We continueto believe that we have significant opportunity toexpand the participation of our non-U.S. customerbase in our markets. We are focusing on core growthin global markets because we believe that Asia, LatinAmerica, and other emerging markets will experiencesuperior economic and financial markets growth overthe next decade compared with the more matureNorth American and European markets. In particular,we plan to expand our presence in major financialcenters in Asia, grow our commodities business withnon-U.S. customers and products and penetrateemerging markets, such as China and India.To further enhance our customers’ tradingopportunities, we have partnered with leadingexchanges around the world to make their productsavailable on or through our CME Globex platformand network. These arrangements allow ourcustomers to access many of the world’s mostactively traded equity futures contracts—BrazilianIBovespa index futures, Korean Kospi 200 indexfutures, Indian Nifty 50 index futures, JapaneseNikkei 225 index futures and the Mexican IPC index.These strategic relationships allow us to accelerateour market penetration, expand our customer reach,lower barriers of access to global benchmarks anddevelop product sales channels with local brokers.These relationships are also designed to allow thecustomers of our partner exchanges to access ourproducts and markets. During 2012, we strengthenedour international partnerships, includingimplementing our cross-listing and cross-licensingarrangement with BM&FBOVESPA S.A.(BM&FBOVESPA), and increasing our investmentin the Dubai Mercantile Exchange to help build thenew benchmark for crude oil East of Suez.In May 2011, we launched CME Clearing Europeand we have made steady progress building on ourEuropean presence to further extend the geographicalreach of our clearing services. We offer clearingservices on over-the-counter commodity derivativeproducts, including energy, agriculture, freight andprecious metals, through CME Clearing Europe, andwe continue to expand the range of eligible products.Next steps include the clearing of interest rate swaps.In September 2012, we applied to the FSA forapproval to create a London-based exchange that willinitially offer trading of foreign exchange futuresproducts and ultimately expand into other products.We believe establishing an exchange in the UnitedKingdom will leverage the central counterpartymodel of CME Clearing Europe and will allow us tomore closely align with our regional customers inboth listed and over-the-counter markets, and willprovide additional opportunities to our expandingnon-U.S. customer base.Expanding our Existing Customer Base andEnhancing our Product and Services Offerings toMeet their Risk Management Needs—We plan togrow our business by targeting cross asset salesacross client segments, driving international sales(specifically in Asia and Europe) and generating newclient participation across all regions. We have a longhistory of providing customer choice and flexibilityand believe that our products and services make uswell positioned to help our customers adapt andcomply with the new regulations, while enablingthem to manage their risks in as efficient a manner aspossible. With the continued implementation of theDodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and ConsumerProtection Act (Dodd-Frank) and Basel III InterimCapital Framework (Basel III), we expect globalbanks to look for capital efficiencies and move tocentralized clearing on a futures exchange. Wecontinue to focus on new customer onboarding forswaps clearing services, expanding our over-the-counter product offerings and working with the buy-and sell-sides to meet their needs for real-timeclearing, risk management and data reporting.Extending our Capabilities and Business in theOver-the-Counter Markets—Our goal is to provide acomprehensive multi-asset class clearing solution tothe market for maximum operational ease and thecapital efficiency that comes with connecting to asingle clearing house. Our over-the-counter offeringsprovide participants the extensive counterparty creditrisk reduction and transparency of our clearingservices while preserving the prevailing executionprocesses, technology platforms and economicstructures currently in use in the marketplace. We6
  • 17. have built a multi-asset class over-the-counterclearing solution. We offer clearing services forcleared over-the-counter derivatives in interest rateswaps, credit default swaps, foreign exchange andcommodities. In 2012, we strengthened thecapabilities of our over-the-counter product offeringwith the launch of portfolio margining of interest rateswaps and futures positions for all marketparticipants. We continue to collaborate with buy-and sell-side customers to provide the innovativeproducts and services they need to manage their riskeffectively in a continuously evolving marketplace.In 2012, we cleared over-the-counter transactionswith a notional value of over $1.1 trillion, and openinterest as of December 31, 2012 was $691.8 billion.Our CME ClearPort platform offers an array ofclearing services that depend on the nature of theproduct traded and has the capacity to clear andreport transactions in multiple asset classes.Establishing Ourselves as the Leading ExchangeCompany Provider of Information Products andIndex Services and Enhancing our IntellectualProperty Portfolio—We offer a variety of marketdata services for the futures, equities and the over-the-counter markets. In June 2012, we established anew joint venture in which McGraw-Hill contributedits S&P Indices business and we contributed aportion of our CME Group Index Services businessto create S&P/DJI, a global leader in index services.This new venture creates a leading index providerwell-positioned to serve global institutional and retailcustomers and will allow us to continue to beinnovative with product development and co-branding across asset classes. As part of theagreement, we acquired a long-term, ownership-linked, exclusive license to list futures and options onfutures based on the S&P Indices. Our CME GroupIndex Services business was originally formed in2010 as part of a joint venture with Dow Jones &Company. We also plan to expand our existingintellectual property portfolio for our technology andproduct and services offerings.Patents, Trademarks and LicensesWe own the rights to a large number of trademarks,service marks, domain names and trade names in theUnited States, Europe and in other parts of the world.We have registered many of our most importanttrademarks in the United States and other countries.We hold the rights to a number of patents and havemade a number of patent applications. Our patentscover match engine, trader user interface, tradingfloor support, market data, general technology andclearing house functionalities. We also own thecopyright to a variety of materials. Those copyrights,some of which are registered, include printed and on-line publications, web sites, advertisements,educational material, graphic presentations and otherliterature, both textual and electronic. We attempt toprotect our intellectual property rights by relying ontrademarks, patents, copyrights, database rights, tradesecrets, restrictions on disclosure and other methods.We offer equity index futures and options on keybenchmarks, including S&P, NASDAQ, Dow Jonesand Nikkei indexes. We also have an agreement withthe Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE) to listfutures and options on futures for volatility indexeson a variety of asset classes. These products are listedby us subject to license agreements with theapplicable owners of the indexes. We have exclusivearrangements with Standard & Poor’s (S&P), TheNASDAQ OMX Group, Inc. (NASDAQ) and DowJones, and non-exclusive arrangements with the otherthird parties. In connection with our joint venturewith McGraw-Hill, we entered into a new licenseagreement with S&P (S&P License Agreement),which superseded our prior licensing arrangementsand was assigned to the joint venture. In accordancewith the terms and conditions of the S&P LicenseAgreement, the joint venture granted CME a licenseto use certain S&P stock indexes and the related tradenames, trademarks and service marks in connectionwith the creating, issuing, listing, trading, clearing,marketing and promoting of futures contracts,options on futures contracts, swaps and otherderivative contracts. CME’s license for the S&P 500Index will be exclusive for futures and options onfutures until one year prior to the termination of theS&P License Agreement, and non-exclusive for thelast year. The license for the other S&P stock indexesis generally exclusive for futures and options onfutures. The term of the S&P License Agreement willcontinue until the later of (i) December 31, 2017 or(ii) the date that is one year after the date that CMEGroup ceases to own at least five percent (accountingfor dilution) of the outstanding joint venture interests.Upon the occurrence of certain events, includingcertain terminations of the joint venture, the termmay be extended up to an additional ten years. TheS&P License Agreement also provides CME withcertain rights to sublicense its rights under the7
  • 18. agreement to any third-party exchange or otherorganized trading facility located outside of theUnited States. CBOT has a license agreement (DowJones License Agreement) with CME Group IndexServices LLC (CME Indexes), which has also beenassigned to the joint venture. The Dow Jones LicenseAgreement provides CBOT and certain of itsaffiliates a license to use certain Dow Jones stockindexes and the related trade names, trademarks andservice marks in connection with the creating, listing,trading, clearing, marketing and promoting of futurescontracts, options on futures contracts and otherfinancial products that are based upon such DowJones stock indexes. Indexes to which CBOT hasexclusive license rights include the Dow JonesComposite Index, the Dow Jones Industrial AverageIndex, the Dow Jones Transportation Average Indexand the Dow Jones Utility Average Index, amongothers. CBOT holds a non-exclusive license for theDow Jones Global Titans 50 Index, Dow Jones ItalyTitans 30 Index, Dow Jones Sector Titans Indexesand Dow Jones U.S. Real Estate Index, amongothers. CBOT also has certain rights to sublicense itsrights under the Dow Jones License Agreement toany other exchange for the trading of futurescontracts and options on futures contracts. The initialterm of the agreement is from July 1, 2011 throughJune 30, 2026. Following the initial term, the DowJones License Agreement shall automatically renewfor renewal terms of five years thereafter so long asthere is open interest in any of CBOT’s or itsaffiliates’ products based on one or more of the DowJones licensed indexes. In the event there is no openinterest in any such products, then CME Indexes mayterminate the agreement by providing written noticeof non-renewal to CBOT at least six months prior tothe end of the initial term or the then current renewalterm—provided that if any open interest arises duringsuch six-month period, the agreement shallautomatically renew. Our NASDAQ license isexclusive through 2019. Copies of our S&P, DowJones and NASDAQ license arrangements have beenfiled as material contracts. We pay the applicablethird party per trade fees based on contract volumeunder the terms of these licensing agreements.Following the well-publicized issues relating to thecredibility of the London Interbank Offered Rate(LIBOR), numerous investigations were undertakenby regulators and an official study of the benchmarkwas commissioned to evaluate potential reforms. Wecurrently have a licensing and membershipagreement with BBA Enterprises Limited and theBritish Bankers’ Association (collectively, BBA) forthe use of LIBOR to settle several of our interest rateproducts, including our Eurodollar contract. For thelicense, we paid an upfront fee and pay an annual fee.Based on the ongoing review of LIBOR, we expectLIBOR to be reformed rather than replaced and tocontinue as a regulated benchmark. Depending uponthe outcome of the reform efforts, we may need toenter into a new license agreement with BBA or theorganization appointed to administer the benchmark.We cannot assure you that we will be able tomaintain the exclusivity of our licensing agreementswith S&P, Dow Jones and NASDAQ or be able tomaintain our other existing licensing arrangements.In addition, we cannot assure you that others will notsucceed in creating stock index futures based oninformation similar to that which we have obtainedby license, or that market participants will notincreasingly use other instruments, includingsecurities and options based on the S&P, Dow Jonesor NASDAQ indexes, to manage or speculate on U.S.stock risks. Parties may also succeed in offeringindexed products that are similar to our licensedproducts without being required to obtain a license,or in countries that are beyond our jurisdictionalreach and/or our licensors.SeasonalityGenerally, we have historically experiencedrelatively higher contract volume during the first andsecond quarters and sequentially lower contractvolume in the third and fourth quarters. However,such seasonality may also be impacted by generalmarket conditions or other events. During 2012, 27%of our consolidated revenues were recognized in thefirst quarter, 27% in the second quarter, 23% in thethird quarter and 23% in the fourth quarter.Working CapitalWe generally meet our funding requirements withinternally generated funds supplemented from time totime with public debt and commercial paperofferings. For more information on our workingcapital needs, see “Management’s Discussion andAnalysis of Operations and Financial Condition-Liquidity and Capital Resources,” beginning on page55, which section is incorporated herein by reference.8
  • 19. Customer BaseOur customer base includes professional traders,financial institutions, institutional and individualinvestors, major corporations, manufacturers,producers and governments. Our customers canaccess our CME Globex trading platform across theglobe. Customers may be members of one or more ofour CME, CBOT, NYMEX or COMEX exchanges ora permit holder at KCBT. Rights to directly accessour markets will depend upon the nature of thecustomer, such as whether the individual is a memberor permit holder of one of our exchanges or hasexecuted an agreement with us for direct access.Trading rights and privileges are exchange specific.Trading on our open outcry trading floors isconducted exclusively by our members and permitholders. Membership on one of our futures exchangesor ownership of a KCBT permit also enables acustomer to trade specific products at reduced ratesand lower fees. Under the terms of the organizationaldocuments of our exchanges, our members/permitholders have certain rights that relate primarily totrading right protections, certain trading feeprotections and certain membership/permit holderbenefit protections. In 2012, 79% of our contractvolume was conducted by our members and permitholders.The majority of clearing and transaction feesreceived from clearing firms represent charges fortrades executed and cleared on behalf of theircustomers. Two firms each represented 12% of ourclearing and transaction fees revenue for 2012. In theevent a clearing firm were to withdraw, we believethat the customer portion of the firm’s tradingactivity would likely transfer to another clearing firmof the exchange. In 2011, one of our largest clearingfirms was placed into bankruptcy and we transferredall of their more than 30,000 customer accounts toother futures commission merchants.CompetitionThe industry in which we operate is highlycompetitive and we expect competition to continue tointensify, especially in light of the implementation ofDodd-Frank and other reforms of the financialservices industry. For example, Dodd-Frank gives theCFTC authority to require certain swaps to be clearedby central clearing houses and to require certain ofthose swaps mandated for clearing to be traded onexchanges or swap execution facilities, unless noexchange or swap execution facility makes the swapavailable for trading. While these new requirementscreate opportunities for us to expand our over-the-counter business, a number of market participantsand other exchanges and less regulated tradingplatforms have developed, and likely will develop inthe future, competing platforms and products.We encounter competition in all aspects of ourbusiness, including from entities having substantiallygreater capital and resources, offering a wide rangeof products and services and some operating under adifferent and possibly less stringent regulatoryregime. We face competition from other futures,securities and securities option exchanges; over-the-counter markets; clearing organizations; consortiaformed by our members and large marketparticipants; swap execution facilities; alternativetrade execution facilities; technology firms, includingmarket data distributors and electronic trading systemdevelopers; and others.Competition in our Derivatives BusinessWe believe competition in the derivatives andsecurities business is based on a number of factors,including, among others:• depth and liquidity of markets;• transaction costs;• breadth of product offerings and rate andquality of new product development;• ability to position and expand upon existingproducts to address changing market needs;• transparency, reliability and anonymity intransaction processing;• connectivity, accessibility and distribution;• technological capability and innovation;• efficient and secure settlement, clearing andsupport services;• regulatory environment; and• reputation.We believe that we compete favorably with respect tothese factors. Our deep, liquid markets; diverseproduct offerings; rate and quality of new product9
  • 20. development; and efficient, secure settlement,clearing and support services, distinguish us from ourcompetitors. We believe that in order to maintain ourcompetitive position, we must continue to expandglobally; develop new and innovative products;enhance our technology infrastructure, including itsreliability and functionality; maintain liquidity andlow transaction costs, and adopt additional customerprotections designed to ensure the integrity of ourmarket and the confidence of our customers.Our principal competitors include other exchangessuch as NYSE Euronext (NYSE),IntercontinentalExchange, Inc. (ICE), the Hong KongExchanges and Clearing Limited (HKEX) and EurexGroup. In addition, recent industry developments andalliances, such as the Electronic Liquidity Exchange(ELX), have resulted in a growing number of well-capitalized trading service providers that competewith all or a portion of our business. We expectindustry participants to continue to look for ways togrow their business despite the challengingregulatory environment. For example, in December2012, NYSE and ICE entered into a mergeragreement pursuant to which ICE would acquireNYSE. HKEX completed its acquisition of theLondon Metal Exchange in 2012.We face competition from the over-the-countermarket with the trading of contracts similar to thosetraded or cleared on our exchanges, such as swaps,forward contracts and other exchange “look-alike”contracts, in which parties directly negotiate theterms of their contracts, as well as from spot markets,exchange-traded funds, contracts for difference andother substitutes for our products. Development ofswap execution facilities and the mandated clearingrequirement for certain products may createplatforms that promote competitive substitutes forour privately negotiated and exchange-tradedproducts. We primarily face competition from theLCH.Clearnet Group in interest rate swaps and ICEin credit default swaps.Competition in our Transaction ProcessingBusinessIn addition to the competition we face in ourderivatives business, we face a number ofcompetitors in our transaction processing and otherbusiness services. In the past few years, there hasbeen increased competition in the provision ofclearing services and we expect competition tocontinue to increase in connection with theimplementation of Dodd-Frank, which requires themandatory central clearing of standardized over-the-counter products.ICE has its own clearing operations which arecomprised of regulated clearing houses across theUnited States, Europe and Canada. The OptionsClearing Corporation clears U.S.-listed options andclears futures on a number of underlying financialassets including common stocks, currencies and stockindexes. New York Portfolio Clearing, a clearinghouse created by NYSE and The Depository Trust &Clearing Corporation (DTCC), clears interest ratefutures contracts and cross-margins eligible positionsagainst U.S. Treasury and agency securities andrepurchase agreements cleared by DTCC’ssubsidiary, Fixed Income Clearing Corporation. Webelieve that other exchanges may also undertake toprovide clearing services, especially in light of Dodd-Frank’s clearing mandate.We believe competition in the transaction processingand business services market is based on, amongother things, the fees charged for the servicesprovided; quality and reliability of the services;creditworthiness of the clearing house; timelydelivery of the services; reputation; offering breadth;confidentiality of positions and information securityprotective measures; and the value of providingcustomers with capital efficiencies.Competition in our Market Data BusinessTechnology companies, market data and informationvendors and front-end software vendors alsorepresent potential competitors because, as purveyorsof market data or trading software systems, thesefirms typically have substantial distributioncapabilities. As technology firms, they also haveaccess to trading engines that can be connected totheir data and information networks. Additionally,technology and software firms that develop tradingsystems, hardware and networks that are otherwiseoutside of the financial services industry may beattracted to enter our markets. This may lead todecreased demand for our market data.10
  • 21. Regulatory MattersOur operation of futures exchanges is subject toextensive regulation by the CFTC under a principles-based approach which requires that our exchangesubsidiaries satisfy the requirements of certain coreprinciples relating to the operation and oversight ofour markets and our clearing house, but also, as aresult of recent regulations, under a highlyprescriptive regulatory regime. The CFTC carries outthe regulation of the futures markets in accordancewith the provisions of the Commodity Exchange Actas amended by, among others, the CommodityFutures Modernization Act and Dodd-Frank. TheCFTC is subject to reauthorization every five yearsand is scheduled for reconsideration in 2013.In light of widespread financial and economicdifficulties in the U.S. and abroad, particularly acutein the latter half of 2008 and early 2009, there werecalls for a restructuring of the regulation of financialmarkets. Dodd-Frank, which was signed into law in2010, is a comprehensive banking and financialservices reform package that includes significantchanges to the oversight of the derivatives markets,both over-the-counter and exchange-traded. Dodd-Frank reinforces the core tenets of our markets:• price transparency,• liquid markets to minimize transaction cost,• market integrity,• customer protection, and• the safety and soundness of centralcounterparty clearing services.Since the adoption of Dodd-Frank, the CFTC, theSEC, the Department of Treasury and otherregulators have engaged in extensive rulemaking toimplement the legislation. CME Group and others inthe industry continue to actively participate in therulemaking process, with the goal that the finalregulations serve the public interest, fostercompetition and innovation and do not place the U.S.financial services sector at a competitivedisadvantage in the evolving global financialmarkets. Over the past two years, a number ofregulations implementing Dodd-Frank werefinalized, including rules relating to mandatoryclearing and the operation of a clearing house, anti-manipulation, large trader reporting, the definition ofagricultural commodity and certain provisions of therules applicable to designated contract markets.While we continue to believe that the new regulationsprovide opportunities for our business which weintend to explore, a significant portion of the Act,however, remains subject to further rulemaking, andsuch final regulations could include provisions thatnegatively impact our business. SeveralCongressional hearings have been held to evaluatethe situation and various policy suggestions havebeen made to ensure the protection of customersegregated funds. We have incurred and expect tocontinue to incur significant additional costs to makethe necessary changes to our business to comply withthe provisions of Dodd-Frank and any newregulations stemming from these events.Our key areas of focus in the regulatory environmentare:• Changes to the core principles for designatedcontract markets, including any changes tothe rules implementing the competitiveexecution requirements of Core Principle 9.Rules promulgated under this provision mayrequire us to make modifications to themanner in which certain of our contracts tradeand/or require that such products be de-listedas futures and re-listed as swaps after aspecified compliance period.• Changes to the self-regulatory model, which,if modified, could alter the manner in whichwe currently oversee our marketplace. Webelieve that we are best positioned to continueto conduct financial and market surveillanceof our clearing firms.• The implementation of the position limitrules, which could have a significant impacton our commodities business relative to suchmarkets abroad given that it does not appearthat foreign jurisdictions will impose positionlimits rules as stringent as those adopted bythe CFTC. Although the CFTC adopted newposition limits, they were subsequentlyvacated by the U.S. District Court for theDistrict of Columbia and remanded back tothe CFTC.• Concerns regarding the “one size fits all”rules for capital charges implementing BaselIII, as well as whether we will be deemed a11
  • 22. “qualified” central counterparty, and the riskthat these new standards may impose overlyburdensome capital requirements on ourclearing members and customers, which mayeliminate the incentives to trade liquidexchange-traded derivatives instead of otherderivatives products with higher risk profiles.• The potential elimination of the 60/40 taxtreatment of certain of our derivativescontracts, which would impose a significantincrease in tax rates applicable to our marketparticipants, and could result in a decrease intheir trading activity.• The implementation of mechanisms to furtherprotect customer funds at the futurescommission merchant level, and to restoreconfidence in the derivatives markets.Pursuant to Dodd-Frank, in July 2012, the FinancialStability Oversight Council designated CME, due itsoperation of our U.S. clearing house, as asystemically important financial market utility whichcarries with it additional regulatory oversight ofcertain of our risk-management standards, clearingand settlement activities.In 2012, we began operating a registered swap datarepository service that is subject to the oversight ofthe CFTC and we must comply with certain coreprinciples under the Commodity Exchange Act.As a global company with operations and locationsaround the world, we are also subject to the laws andregulations in the locations in which we do business.The financial services industry outside of the UnitedStates is also undergoing similar significant change,particularly in Europe. For example, in the UnitedKingdom the government has proposed to reorganizeits regulatory framework, which would include thedissolution of the FSA with oversight to betransitioned in April 2013 to the Bank of England,the Financial Conduct Authority and the PrudentialRegulation Authority depending upon the status ofthe regulated entity. As a result, in the UnitedKingdom our operations could be subject to multipleregulators: CME Clearing Europe Limited (our U.K.clearing house) would be regulated by the Bank ofEngland, CME Europe Limited (our proposed U.K.exchange) would be regulated by the FinancialConduct Authority and CME (our U.S. clearinghouse) would be regulated by the EuropeanSecurities and Markets Authority (ESMA) as anoverseas clearing house. The European Union is alsoundergoing similar change with multiple supervisoryauthorities, such as ESMA established in 2011. Inaddition to the national regulators, ESMA has asupervisory and oversight role over Europeanclearing houses, non-European clearing houses, non-European exchanges, European trade repositories andnon-European trade repositories providing services inEurope. Multiple legislations such as the EuropeanMarket Infrastructure Regulation, the Markets inFinancial Instruments Directive, the CapitalRequirements Directive IV and the Market AbuseDirective, have been proposed with provisionssimilar to those contained in Dodd-Frank.Compliance with these new regulations may requireus and our customers to dedicate significant financialand operational resources which could result in someparticipants leaving our markets or decreasing theirtrading activity which would negatively affect ourprofitability. To the extent the regulatoryenvironment following the implementation of Dodd-Frank and other financial reform regulations is lessbeneficial for us or our customers, our business,financial condition and operating results could benegatively affected.If we fail to comply with applicable laws, rules orregulations, we may be subject to censure, fines,cease-and-desist orders, suspension of our business,removal of personnel or other sanctions, includingrevocation of our designations as a contract marketand derivatives clearing organization.In 2012, notifications from one of our market datadistributors made in accordance with therequirements of our market data license agreementincluded disclosures that such distributor haddisseminated our market data to the GovernmentTrading Corporation (GTC) and to a Europeansubsidiary of the National Iranian Oil Company(NIOC). In 2012, the gross revenues attributable tothese indirect subscriptions made through thedistributor were $3,150. The terms and conditions onwhich the market data was disseminated by thedistributor to GTC and NIOC are the same as wouldbe provided to any other indirect subscriber. Otherthan the execution of a uniform subscriber addendumthat is made available to all of our distributors for usewith their subscribers, we do not have any12
  • 23. contractual or other relationship with GTC or NIOC.We believe that the distribution of our market data,which is otherwise publicly available in other formson our Web site on a real-time and delayed basis, isexempt from applicable U.S. sanctions programspursuant to a statutory and regulatory exemption forexports of information and informational materials.Nevertheless, we are in the process of requesting thatour market data distributors refrain from providingour market data to their subscribers that are located insanctioned countries or identified on the U.S.Treasury Department’s Specially DesignatedNationals and Blocked Persons List. The distributionof our market data to GTC and NIOC is subject todisclosure pursuant to Section 219 of the Iran ThreatReduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012(ITRSHR Act) and Section 13(r) of the SecuritiesExchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act), whichrequires an issuer to disclose in its annual orquarterly reports, as applicable, whether it or any ofits affiliates knowingly engaged in certain activities,transactions or dealings relating to Iran or withdesignated natural persons or entities involved interrorism or the proliferation of weapons of massdestruction. Disclosure is required whether or not theactivities are sanctionable under U.S. law. Inconnection with these disclosures, we will berequired to separately file, concurrently with thisAnnual Report, a notice that such activities have beendisclosed in this report, which notice must alsocontain the information required by Section 13(r) ofthe Exchange Act.There continues to be significant focus among theCFTC, SEC and foreign regulators relating toperceived risks, level playing field considerations andpotential market abuses associated with algorithmictrading and high frequency trading following recenthighly publicized technical problems, including the2010 “flash crash” and the significant losses incurredby Knight Capital. Although not clearly defined, highfrequency trading typically refers to professionaltraders, acting in a proprietary capacity, that engagein strategies that generate a large number of trades ona daily basis. The CFTC has formed a subcommitteeto define high frequency trading within the context ofautomated trading systems, determine theappropriateness of creating multiple categories forhigh frequency traders, conduct an analysis of theoversight, surveillance and economic aspects, andidentify potential market disruptions that could beprovoked by such traders and possible mitigations.We believe, and there is considerable supportingevidence, that high frequency traders play animportant role in the marketplace by increasingliquidity, narrowing spreads and enhancing theefficiency of markets. At this time, however, it isunclear whether these inquires will result inrestrictions on the use of high frequency trading.In the United States and Europe, there are severalproposals to tax financial transactions or to assessuser fees for market participants. For example, in theUnited States, there is discussion of assessing a userfee to fund the CFTC, and in Europe, legislativebodies are considering a tax on all financialtransactions. In the past, efforts to implement atransaction tax or user fee have not been successful.The implementation of additional costs to use ourmarkets may discourage institutions and individualsfrom using our products to manage their risks, whichcould adversely impact our contract volumes,revenues and profits, and may also adversely impactour ability to compete on an international level. Atransaction tax or user fee in the U.S. may also causemarket participants to transition to, and/or increasetheir derivatives trading in, jurisdictions outside theU.S. which do not necessarily impose a comparablecost at this time.In addition, the U.S. Congress may propose toeliminate the favorable 60/40 tax treatment forfutures. The current tax treatment for futures tradingallows certain traders to pay a blend of taxes on theirgains and losses from trading futures and options,with 60% at capital gains rates and 40% at ordinarytax rates. Any repeal of 60/40 tax treatment wouldimpose a substantial increase in tax rates applicableto our market participants who are most responsiblefor creating liquid and efficient markets.13
  • 24. EmployeesAs of December 31, 2012, we had approximately2,600 employees. We consider relations with ouremployees to be good.Executive OfficersThe following are our executive officers, including adescription of their business experience over the lastfive years. Ages are as of February 1, 2013. Effectiveas of April 2012, the titles for CME Group’sManagement Team were changed from ManagingDirector to Senior Managing Director. As the changewas not a substantive change in the individual’s roleat the Company, we have continued to reflect theoriginal date that the individuals assumed theircurrent roles.Terrence A. Duffy, 54Mr. Duffy has served as our Executive Chairman andPresident since May 2012. Mr. Duffy previouslyserved as our Executive Chairman from 2006 and hasbeen a member of our board of directors since 1995.He also served as President of TDA Trading, Inc.from 1981 to 2002 and has been a member of ourCME exchange since 1981.Phupinder S. Gill, 52Mr. Gill has served as our Chief Executive Officerand a member of our board of directors since May2012. Previously, he served as our President from2007 to May 2012. Mr. Gill joined us in 1988 andsince then has held various positions of increasingresponsibility within the organization, includingPresident and Chief Operating Officer, and ManagingDirector and President of CME Clearing and GFXCorporation. Mr. Gill also serves as ourrepresentative on the board of Bursa MalaysiaDerivatives Berhad.Kathleen M. Cronin, 49Ms. Cronin has served as our Senior ManagingDirector, General Counsel and Corporate Secretarysince 2003. Previously she served as CorporateSecretary and Acting General Counsel from 2002through 2003. Prior to joining us, Ms. Cronin was acorporate attorney at Skadden, Arps, Slate,Meagher & Flom from 1989 through 1995 and from1997 through 2002.Bryan T. Durkin, 52Mr. Durkin has served as our Chief Operating Officersince 2007. He also held the title of ManagingDirector, Products and Services from 2010 to July2012. Mr. Durkin joined us in connection with theCBOT merger and he previously held a variety ofleadership roles with CBOT from 1982 to 2007, mostrecently as Executive Vice President and ChiefOperating Officer.Julie Holzrichter, 44Ms. Holzrichter has served as Senior ManagingDirector, Global Operations since 2007.Ms. Holzrichter rejoined us in 2006 as our ManagingDirector, CME Globex Services and TechnologyIntegration. Ms. Holzrichter previously held positionsof increasing responsibility in our organization from1986 to 2003 in trading operations.Kevin Kometer, 48Mr. Kometer has served as Senior Managing Directorand Chief Information Officer since 2008. Hepreviously served as Managing Director and DeputyChief Information Officer from 2007 to 2008. Sincejoining the company most recently in 1998, he hasheld senior leadership positions in the TechnologyDivision, including Managing Director, TradingExecution Systems and Director, AdvancedTechnology. Mr. Kometer was also with thecompany from 1994 to 1996.James E. Parisi, 48Mr. Parisi has served as our Chief Financial Officersince 2004. Mr. Parisi joined us in 1988 and has heldpositions of increasing responsibility within theorganization, including Managing Director &Treasurer and Director, Planning & Finance.Laurent Paulhac, 43Mr. Paulhac has served as Senior Managing Director,Financial and OTC Products & Services since 2012and as Managing Director, OTC Products andServices from 2009 to 2012. Prior to joining thecompany, Mr. Paulhac most recently served as ChiefExecutive Officer of Credit Market Analysis from2005 to 2009.14
  • 25. Hilda Harris Piell, 45Ms. Piell has served as Senior Managing Directorand Chief Human Resources Officer since 2007.Previously she served as Managing Director andSenior Associate General Counsel, as Director andAssociate General Counsel and as Associate Directorand Assistant General Counsel since joining us in2000.James V. Pieper, 46Mr. Pieper has served as our Managing Director andChief Accounting Officer since 2010. Previously,Mr. Pieper served as Director and Controller since2006 and as Associate Director and AssistantController from 2004 to 2006.John W. Pietrowicz, 48Mr. Pietrowicz has served as our Senior ManagingDirector, Business Development and CorporateFinance since 2010. Mr. Pietrowicz joined us in 2003and since then has held various positions ofincreasing responsibility, including his most recentposition of Managing Director and Deputy ChiefFinancial Officer from 2009 to 2010 and ManagingDirector, Corporate Finance and Treasury from 2006to 2009.Linda Rich, 49Ms. Rich has served as our Senior ManagingDirector, Government Relations and LegislativeAffairs since April 2012. Prior to assuming hercurrent role, Ms. Rich served as Managing Director,Government Relations and Legislative Affairs sincejoining us in 2010. Before joining the company,Ms. Rich served as Senior Vice President,Government Relations for NYSE Euronext. Herbackground also includes serving as senior counsel tothe U.S. House of Representatives Committee onFinancial Services and as counsel to the U.S. Houseof Representatives Committee on Commerce.Derek Sammann, 44Mr. Sammann has served as our Senior ManagingDirector, Financial Products and Services since 2009.He previously served as our Global Head of ForeignExchange Products since joining us in 2006. Prior tojoining us, Mr. Sammann served as ManagingDirector, Global Head of FX Options and StructuredProducts at Calyon Corporate and Investment Bankin London from 1997 to 2006.Kimberly S. Taylor, 51Ms. Taylor has served as our President, CMEClearing since 2004 and as Managing Director, RiskManagement in the Clearing House Division from1998 to 2003. Ms. Taylor has held a variety ofpositions in the Clearing House, including VicePresident and Senior Director. She joined us in 1989.Kendal Vroman, 41Mr. Vroman has served as our Senior ManagingDirector, Commodity and Information Products &Services since 2010. Mr. Vroman previously servedas Managing Director and Chief CorporateDevelopment Officer from 2008 to 2010.Mr. Vroman joined us in 2001 and since then hasheld positions of increasing responsibility, includingmost recently as Managing Director, CorporateDevelopment and Managing Director, Informationand Technology Services.Scot E. Warren, 49Mr. Warren has served as our Senior ManagingDirector, Equity Index Products and Index Servicessince 2010. Mr. Warren previously served as ourManaging Director, Equity Products since joining usin 2007. Prior to that, Mr. Warren worked forGoldman Sachs as its Vice President, ManagerTrading and Business Analysis Team. Prior toGoldman Sachs, Mr. Warren managed equity andoption execution and clearing businesses for ABNAmro in Chicago and was a Senior Consultant forArthur Andersen & Co. for financial services firms.Robert Zagotta, 48Mr. Zagotta has served as Senior Managing Director,Products and Services of CME Group since July2012. Prior to joining the company, Mr. Zagotta mostrecently served as Executive Vice President,Business Strategy and Execution for ProjectLeadership Associates (PLA) from 2007 to July2012, where he worked with CME Group on anumber of strategic consulting assignments. Beforejoining PLA, Mr. Zagotta was a Partner and Co-Founder of Fourth Floor Consulting, which wasacquired by PLA, and a Senior Manager atPricewaterhouseCoopers.15
  • 26. FINANCIAL INFORMATION ABOUTGEOGRAPHIC AREASCME Group has not historically tracked revenuesbased upon geographic location. Beginning inSeptember 2011, we began tracking trading volumebased on the country of origin of the transaction asdisclosed to us by the customer. Prior to September2011, we tracked trading volume based on the time ofthe execution of the trade and whether it occurredduring traditional U.S. trading hours or through ourinternational telecommunication hubs.In 2012, we estimate that approximately 21% of ourelectronic trading volume originated from outside ofthe United States. The following table shows thepercentage of our total contract volume on ourGlobex electronic trading platform generated duringnon-U.S. hours and through our international hubsfor the last three years.2012 2011 2010Trading during non-U.S. hours . . 17% 16% 15%Trading throughtelecommunication hubs . . . . . 15% 8% 9%AVAILABLE INFORMATIONOur Web site is www.cmegroup.com. Informationmade available on our Web site does not constitutepart of this document. We make available on ourWeb site our Annual Reports on Form 10-K,Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports onForm 8-K and amendments to those reports as soonas reasonably practicable after we electronically fileor furnish such materials to the SEC. Our corporategovernance materials, including our CorporateGovernance Principles, Director Conflict of InterestPolicy, Board of Directors Code of Ethics,Categorical Independence Standards, Employee Codeof Conduct and the charters for all the standingcommittees of our board, may also be found on ourWeb site. Copies of these materials are also availableto shareholders free of charge upon written request toShareholder Relations, Attention Ms. Beth Hausoul,CME Group Inc., 20 South Wacker Drive, Chicago,Illinois 60606.ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORSIn addition to the other information contained in thisAnnual Report on Form 10-K, you should carefullyconsider the factors discussed below, which are therisks that we believe are material at this time. Theserisks could materially and adversely affect ourbusiness, financial condition and results ofoperations. These risks and uncertainties are not theonly ones facing us. Additional risks anduncertainties not presently known to us or that wecurrently believe to be immaterial may also adverselyaffect our business.RISKS RELATING TO OUR INDUSTRYOur business is subject to the impact of domesticand international market, economic and politicalconditions which are beyond our control and whichcould significantly reduce our contract volumes andmake our financial results more volatile.Our revenue is substantially dependent on thecontract volume in our markets. Our contract volumeis directly affected by domestic and internationalfactors that are beyond our control, including:• economic, political and geopolitical marketconditions;• volatile weather patterns, droughts, naturaldisasters and other catastrophes;• broad trends in industry and finance;• changes in price levels, contract volumes andvolatility in the derivatives markets and inunderlying equity, foreign exchange, interestrate and commodity markets;• changes in global or regional demand orsupply shifts in commodities underlying ourproducts;• legislative and regulatory changes, includingany direct or indirect restrictions on orincreased costs associated with trading in ourmarkets;• competition;• changes in government monetary policies,especially central bank decisions related toquantitative easing;• availability of capital to our marketparticipants and their appetite for risk-taking;16
  • 27. • levels of assets under management; and• consolidation in our customer base and withinour industry.Any one or more of these factors may contribute toreduced activity in our markets. Historically, ourtrading volume has tended to increase during periodsof heightened uncertainty due to increased hedgingactivity and the increased need to manage the risksassociated with, or speculate on, volatility in the U.S.equity markets, fluctuations in interest rates and pricechanges in the foreign exchange, commodity andother markets. However, as evidenced by ourperformance in recent years, in the period after amaterial market disturbance, there may persistextreme uncertainties which may lead to decreasedvolume due to factors such as reduced risk exposure,lower interest rates, central bank asset purchaseprograms, and lack of available capital. During 2012,the U.S. economy remained constrained due touncertainty surrounding the Presidential election, thepending fiscal cliff, and fears of globalrecession. Europe also continues to face uncertaintywith some euro-zone countries in recession. As aresult, period-to-period comparisons of our financialresults are not necessarily meaningful. The shifts inmarket trading patterns experienced since thefinancial disturbance of 2008 may or may not persist,and they will be affected by future economicuncertainties, including the pending decisionsregarding U.S. spending, central bank asset purchaseactivity and currency management policies aroundthe world. All of these uncertainties as well as newsurprises may result in continued decreased tradingvolume and a more difficult business environment forus. Material decreases in trading volume would havea material adverse effect on our financial conditionand operating results.We operate in a heavily regulated environment thatimposes significant costs and competitive burdenson our business and such environment is currentlyundergoing significant reform.Our business has been extensively regulated by theCFTC. In response to the economic crisis, the Dodd-Frank Act was signed into law in 2010. Thislegislation is a comprehensive banking and financialservices reform package that includes significantchanges to the oversight of the derivatives markets,both over-the-counter and exchange-traded. Inaccordance with Dodd-Frank, the CFTC’s authorityhas been significantly expanded to include over-the-counter derivatives.Since the adoption of Dodd-Frank, the CFTC, theSEC, the Department of Treasury and otherregulators have engaged in extensive rulemaking toimplement the legislation. CME Group and others inthe industry continue to actively participate in therulemaking process with the goal that the finalregulations serve the public interest, fostercompetition and innovation and do not place the U.S.financial services sector at a competitivedisadvantage in our evolving global financialmarkets. Over the past two years, a number ofregulations implementing Dodd-Frank werefinalized, including rules relating to mandatoryclearing and the operation of a clearing house, anti-manipulation, large trader reporting, the definition ofagricultural commodity and certain provisions of therules applicable to designated contract markets.While we continue to believe that the new regulationsprovide opportunities for our business which weintend to explore, a significant portion of the Act,however, remains subject to further rulemaking, andsuch final regulations could include provisions thatnegatively impact our business, including changes toCore Principle 9.The implementation of Basel III and its “one size fitsall” rules for capital charges, as well as greatercapital charges that will apply if we are not deemed a“qualified” central counterparty, may impose overlyburdensome capital requirements on our bank-affiliated clearing members and customers, whichcould eliminate the incentives to trade liquidexchange-traded derivatives instead of otherderivatives products with higher risk profiles. Thelocal rules implementing these internationalstandards have not been finalized. We will complywith CFTC regulations that will be issued, andtherefore we expect to be deemed a “qualified”central counterparty when those regulations areeffective. However, to the extent that we are notdeemed a “qualified” central counterparty during theinterim period or thereafter, it could result inincreased costs to our bank-affiliated clearingmembers and result in them electing to clear theirbusiness at another “qualified” central counterpartyor imposing increased costs on customers that preferto clear at CME.Additionally, the futures industry, its self-regulatorymodel and the segregation and customer protection17
  • 28. regime are under scrutiny by the CFTC andCongress. Several Congressional hearings have beenheld to evaluate the situation and various policysuggestions have been made to ensure the protectionof customer segregated funds.Our operation of a registered swap data repositoryalso subjects us to additional oversight of the CFTCand we must comply with additional core principlesrelating to the operation of this newly formedregulated business.As a global company with operations around theworld, we are also subject to the laws and regulationsin the locations in which we do business. We cannotassure you that we and/or our directors, officers,employees and affiliates will be able to fully complywith these rules and regulations. We also cannotassure you that we will not be subject to claims oractions by any of these regulatory agencies. Oursubsidiaries, CME Clearing Europe, CME MarketingEurope and CME Europe Limited (subject toobtaining FSA approval), are also subject to thesupervision and oversight of the FSA (and in thefuture by the Bank of England and the FinancialConduct Authority which will replace the FSA). Theregulatory environment in the United Kingdom andthe European Union is undergoing significantreforms in connection with the oversight of thefinancial services industry. In response to theeconomic crisis, a number of financial servicelegislations covering issues similar to those includedin Dodd-Frank have also been proposed in Europe.As we continue to expand our operations in theUnited Kingdom with our UK clearing house andproposed UK exchange, changes in the European(including the UK) regulatory environment will havea greater impact on our business.Compliance with these new regulations may requireus and our customers to dedicate significant financialand operational resources, which could result in someparticipants leaving our markets or decreasing theirtrading activity, which would negatively affect ourprofitability. To the extent the regulatoryenvironment following the implementation of Dodd-Frank and other financial reform regulations is lessbeneficial for us or our customers, our business,financial condition and operating results could benegatively affected.If we fail to comply with applicable laws, rules orregulations, we may be subject to censure, fines,cease-and-desist orders, suspension of our business,removal of personnel or other sanctions, includingrevocation of our designations as a contract marketand derivatives clearing organization.In the United States and Europe, there are severalproposals to tax financial transactions or to assessuser fees for market participants. For example, in theUnited States, there is a discussion of assessing a userfee to fund the CFTC, and in Europe, legislativebodies are considering a tax on all financialtransactions. In the past, efforts to implement atransaction tax or user fee have not been successful.The implementation of additional costs to use ourmarkets may discourage institutions and individualsfrom using our products to manage their risks, whichcould adversely impact our contract volumes,revenues and profits and also adversely impact ourability to compete on an international level. Atransaction tax or user fee in the U.S. may also causemarket participants to transition and/or increase theirderivatives trading in jurisdictions outside the U.S.,which do not necessarily impose a comparable cost atthis time.In addition, the U.S. Congress may propose toeliminate the favorable 60/40 tax treatment forfutures. The current tax treatment for futures tradingallows certain traders to pay a blend of taxes on theirgains and losses from trading futures and options,with 60% at capital gains rates and 40% at ordinarytax rates. Any repeal of 60/40 tax treatment wouldimpose a substantial increase in tax rates applicableto our market participants who are responsible forcreating liquid and efficient markets.Some of our largest clearing firms have indicatedtheir belief that clearing facilities should not beowned or controlled by exchanges and should beoperated as utilities and not for profit. Theseclearing firms have sought, and may seek in thefuture, legislative or regulatory changes that would,if adopted, enable them to use alternative clearingservices for positions established on our exchangesor to freely move open positions among clearinghouses in order to take advantage of our liquidity.Even if they are not successful, these factors maycause them to limit the use of our markets.Some of our largest clearing firms, which aresignificant customers and intermediaries in ourproducts, have stressed the importance to them of18
  • 29. centralizing clearing of futures contracts and optionson futures contracts in order to maximize theefficient use of their capital, exercise greater controlover their value at risk and extract greater operatingleverage from clearing activities. Many clearingfirms have expressed the view that clearing firmsshould control the governance of clearing houses orthat clearing houses should be operated as utilitiesrather than as part of for-profit enterprises. Some ofthese firms, along with certain industry associations,have sought, and may seek in the future, legislativeor regulatory changes to be adopted that wouldfacilitate mechanisms or policies that allow marketparticipants to transfer positions from an exchange-owned clearing house to a clearing house owned andcontrolled by clearing firms. Our strategic businessplan is to operate a vertically integrated transactionexecution, clearing and settlement business for ourfutures and options on futures business. If theselegislative or regulatory changes are adopted, ourstrategy and business plan may lead clearing firms toestablish, or seek to use, alternative clearing housesfor clearing positions established on our exchanges.Even if they are not successful in their efforts, thefactors described above may cause clearing firms tolimit or stop the use of our products and markets. Ifany of these events occur, our revenues and profitscould be adversely affected.We face intense competition from other companies,including some of our members. If we are not ableto successfully compete, our business will notsurvive.The industry in which we operate is highlycompetitive and we expect competition to continue tointensify, especially in light of the implementation ofDodd-Frank and other reforms of the financialservices industry. For example, Dodd-Frank gives theCFTC authority to require certain swaps to be clearedby central clearing houses and to require certain ofthose swaps mandated for clearing to be traded onexchanges or swap execution facilities, unless noexchange or swap execution facility makes the swapavailable for clearing. While these new requirementscreate opportunities for us to expand our over-the-counter business, a number of market participantsand other exchanges and less regulated tradingplatforms have developed, and likely will develop inthe future, competing platforms and products.We encounter competition in all aspects of ourbusiness, including from entities having substantiallygreater capital and resources, offering a wide rangeof products and services and some operating under adifferent and possibly less stringent regulatoryregime. We face competition from other futures,securities and securities option exchanges; over-the-counter markets; clearing organizations; consortiaformed by our members and large marketparticipants; swap execution facilities; alternativetrade execution facilities; technology firms, includingmarket data distributors and electronic trading systemdevelopers; and others.Our principal competitors include other exchangessuch as NYSE, ICE, HKEX and Eurex Group. Inaddition, recent industry developments and alliances,such as ELX, have resulted in a growing number ofwell-capitalized trading service providers thatcompete with all or a portion of our business. Weexpect industry participants to continue to look forways to grow their business despite the challengingregulatory environment. For example, in December2012, NYSE and ICE entered into a mergeragreement pursuant to which ICE would acquireNYSE. HKEX completed its acquisition of theLondon Metal Exchange in 2012.Other companies have entered into or are formingjoint ventures or consortia to provide services similarto those provided by us. Others may becomecompetitive with us through acquisitions. Federal lawallows institutions that have been major participantson our exchange to trade the same or similar productsamong themselves without utilizing any exchange ortrading system. Many of our competitors andpotential competitors have greater financial,marketing, technological and personnel resourcesthan we do. These factors may enable them todevelop similar products, to provide lowertransaction costs and better execution to theircustomers and to carry out their business strategiesmore quickly and efficiently than we can. In addition,our competitors may:• respond more quickly to competitivepressures, including responses based upontheir corporate governance structures, whichmay be more flexible and efficient than ourcorporate governance structure;• develop products that are preferred by ourcustomers;• develop risk transfer products that competewith our products;19
  • 30. • price their products and services morecompetitively;• develop and expand their networkinfrastructure and service offerings moreefficiently;• utilize better, more user-friendly and morereliable technology;• take greater advantage of acquisitions,alliances and other opportunities;• more effectively market, promote and selltheir products and services;• better leverage existing relationships withcustomers and alliance partners or exploitbetter recognized brand names to market andsell their services; and• exploit regulatory disparities betweentraditional, regulated exchanges andalternative markets that benefit from areduced regulatory burden and lower-costbusiness model.If our products, markets and services are notcompetitive, our business, financial condition andoperating results will be materially harmed.A decline in our fees or any loss of customers couldlower our revenues, which would adversely affect ourprofitability.Changes in regulations as a result of implementationof the Dodd-Frank Act and other restructuring of theregulation of the global financial markets orotherwise, may adversely impact our ability tocompete, especially on a global basis.Our contract volume, and consequently ourrevenues and profits, would be adversely affected ifwe are unable to retain our current customers orattract new customers.The success of our business depends, in part, on ourability to maintain and increase our contract volume.To do so, we must maintain and expand our productofferings, our customer base and our trade executionfacilities. Our success also depends on our ability tooffer competitive prices and services in anincreasingly price-sensitive business. For example, inrecent years, some of our competitors have engagedin aggressive pricing strategies, including loweringthe fees that they charge for taking liquidity andincreasing liquidity payments/rebates they provide asan incentive for providers of liquidity in certainmarkets. We cannot assure you that we will be ableto continue to expand our product lines, that we willbe able to retain our current customers or attract newcustomers or that we will not be required to modifyour pricing structure to compete effectively. Changesin our pricing structure may result in a decrease inour profit margin. We bill a substantial portion of ourclearing and transaction fees to our clearing firms. Ifwe are unable to effectively compete, we couldexperience decreased volumes. The majority ofclearing and transaction fees received from clearingfirms represent charges for trades executed andcleared on behalf of their customers. Two firms eachrepresented 12% of our clearing and transaction feesrevenue for 2012. Should a clearing firm withdraw,we believe that the customer portion of the firm’strading activity would likely transfer to anotherclearing firm of the exchange. Additionally, fromtime to time, certain customers may represent asignificant portion of the open interest in ourindividual product lines or contracts. If we fail tomaintain our contract volume; expand our productofferings or execution facilities; or lose a substantialnumber of our current customers, or a subset ofcustomers representing a significant percentage ofcontract volume in a particular product line; or areunable to attract new customers, our business andrevenues will be adversely affected. The shortfall incustomer segregated funds at MF Global and themisappropriation of customer property at PeregrineFinancial Group, Inc. (PFG) may have an impact onthe overall confidence in the futures markets, whichcould have a negative impact on contract volume.Furthermore, declines in contract volume due to lossof customers may negatively impact market liquidity,which could lead to further loss of contract volume.As a financial services provider, we are subject tosignificant litigation risk and potential securitieslaw liability.Many aspects of our business involve substantiallitigation risks. While we generally are protected byour rules limiting liability for system failures andcertain forms of negligence and by statutory limits onprivate causes of actions in cases where we have notbehaved in bad faith, we could be exposed tosubstantial liability under federal and state laws andcourt decisions, as well as rules and regulations20
  • 31. promulgated by the SEC and the CFTC. These risksinclude, among others, potential liability fromdisputes over terms of a trade, the claim that a systemfailure or delay caused monetary losses to acustomer, that we entered into an unauthorizedtransaction or that we provided materially false ormisleading statements in connection with atransaction. Dissatisfied customers frequently makeclaims regarding quality of trade execution,improperly settled trades, mismanagement or evenfraud against their service providers. We maybecome subject to these claims as a result of failuresor malfunctions of our systems and services weprovide. For example, we served as the designatedself regulatory organization for MF Global. There areongoing investigations by the Department of Justice,the FBI, the CFTC, and the SEC into the eventssurrounding the MF Global bankruptcy, includingdetermining which individuals and entities may havecivil or criminal liability for the shortfall. Wecontinue to believe that we acted appropriately andthat our actions do not give rise to liability. We havebeen named as a party to a number of lawsuits inconnection with the MF Global matter, which havebeen consolidated. There is no guarantee that we willnot become the subject of additional litigationrelating to the matter or that we will be successful indefending against these claims or any other actionrelating to MF Global or any matter brought in thefuture. We could incur significant legal expensesdefending claims, even those without merit. Inaddition, an adverse resolution of any future lawsuitor claim against us could have a material adverseeffect on our business and our reputation.Our role in the global marketplace may place us atgreater risk than other companies for a cyber attackand other cyber security risks. Our networks andthose of our third party service providers may bevulnerable to security risks, which could result inwrongful use of our information or causeinterruptions in our operations that cause us to losecustomers and contract volume and result insignificant liabilities. We could also be required toincur significant expense to protect our systems.We regard the secure transmission of confidentialinformation and the ability to continuously transactand clear on our electronic trading platforms ascritical elements of our operations. Our networks andthose of our third-party service providers and ourcustomers may be vulnerable to unauthorized access,fraud, computer viruses, denial of service attacks,terrorism, firewall or encryption failures and othersecurity problems. Recently, groups have targeted thefinancial services industry as part of their protestagainst the perceived lack of regulation of thefinancial sector and economic inequality, includingcalls to their supporters to launch cyber attacks onnumerous financial institutions, which in some caseshave resulted in brief outages to their externalcorporate web sites. Our role in the globalmarketplace may place us at greater risk than otherpublic companies for a cyber attack and otherinformation security risks.Additionally, our role as a leading derivativesmarketplace and the operation of our CME Globexelectronic trading platform may place us at greaterrisk for misappropriation of our intellectual property.For example, in 2012, a former employee of CMEGroup plead guilty to theft of our trade secrets. Whilewe do not believe that any customer information,trade data or required regulatory information wascompromised in this incident and we have noevidence that the trade secrets were distributed inconnection with this matter, we cannot assure youthat we will not be the subject of future malfeasance.Other persons who circumvent security measurescould wrongfully use our information or causeinterruptions or malfunctions in our operations.Although we have not been the victim of cyber attacksor other cyber incidents that have had a materialimpact on our operations or financial condition, wehave from time to time experienced cyber securitybreaches such as computer viruses and similarinformation technology violations that are typical for acompany of our size that operates in the globalfinancial marketplace. As part of our globalinformation security program, we employ resources tomonitor the environment and protect our infrastructureagainst such cyber attacks and the potentialmisappropriation of our intellectual property assets.However, these measures may prove insufficientdepending upon the attack or threat posed, whichcould result in system failures and delays that couldcause us to lose customers, experience lower contractvolume, incur significant liabilities or have a negativeimpact on our competitive advantage.21
  • 32. We may be at greater risk from terrorism than othercompanies.We may be more likely than other companies to be adirect target of, or an indirect casualty of, attacks byterrorists or terrorist organizations. It is impossible toaccurately predict the likelihood or impact of anyterrorist attack on the derivatives industry generallyor on our business. While we have undertakensignificant measures to develop business continuityplans and to establish backup sites, in the event of anattack or a threat of an attack, these security measuresand contingency plans may be inadequate to preventsignificant disruptions in our business, technology oraccess to the infrastructure necessary to maintain ourbusiness. Such attack may result in the closure of ourtrading and clearing facilities or render our backupdata and recovery systems inoperable. Damage to ourfacilities due to terrorist attacks may be significantlyin excess of any amount of insurance received, or wemay not be able to insure against such damage at areasonable price or at all. The threat of terroristattacks may also negatively affect our ability toattract and retain employees. Any of these eventscould have a material adverse effect on our business,financial condition and operating results.RISKS RELATING TO OUR BUSINESSThe success of our markets will depend on ourability to complete development of, successfullyimplement and maintain the electronic tradingsystems that have the functionality, performance,reliability and speed required by our customers.The future success of our business depends in largepart on our ability to create interactive electronicmarketplaces in a wide range of derivatives productsthat have the required functionality, performance,capacity, reliability and speed to attract and retaincustomers. A significant portion of our overallvolume is generated through electronic trading on ourCME Globex electronic platform.We must continue to enhance our electronic tradingplatform to remain competitive. As a result, we willcontinue to be subject to risks, expenses anduncertainties encountered in the rapidly evolvingmarket for electronic transaction services. These risksinclude our failure or inability to:• provide reliable and cost-effective services toour customers;• develop, in a timely manner, the requiredfunctionality to support electronic trading inour key products in a manner that iscompetitive with the functionality supportedby other electronic markets;• match fees of our competitors that offer onlyelectronic trading facilities;• attract independent software vendors to writefront-end software that will effectively accessour electronic trading system and automatedorder routing system;• respond to technological developments orservice offerings by competitors; and• generate sufficient revenue to justify thesubstantial capital investment we have madeand will continue to make to enhance ourelectronic trading platform.If we do not successfully enhance our electronictrading platform, or our current or potentialcustomers do not accept it, our revenues and profitswill be adversely affected. Additionally, we rely onour customers’ ability to have the necessary backoffice functionality to support our new products andour trading and clearing functionality. To the extentour customers are not prepared and/or lack theresources or infrastructure, the success of our newinitiatives may be compromised.In addition, if we are unable to develop our electronictrading systems to include other products andmarkets, or if our electronic trading systems do nothave the required functionality, performance,capacity, reliability and speed, we may not be able tocompete successfully in an environment that isincreasingly dominated by electronic trading.If we experience systems failures or capacityconstraints, our ability to conduct our operationsand execute our business strategy could bematerially harmed and we could be subjected tosignificant costs and liabilities.We are heavily dependent on the capacity, reliabilityand security of the computer and communicationssystems and software supporting our operations. Wereceive and/or process a large portion of our tradeorders through electronic means, such as throughpublic and private communications networks. Oursystems, or those of our third party providers, may22
  • 33. fail or operate slowly, causing one or more of thefollowing to occur:• unanticipated disruptions in service to ourcustomers;• slower response times;• delays in our customers’ trade execution;• failed settlement of trades;• incomplete or inaccurate accounting,recording or processing of trades;• financial losses;• security breaches;• litigation or other customer claims;• loss of customers; and• regulatory sanctions.We cannot assure you that we will not experiencesystems failures from power or telecommunicationsfailure, acts of God, war or terrorism, human error,natural disasters, fire, sabotage, hardware or softwaremalfunctions or defects, computer viruses, acts ofvandalism or similar occurrences. If any of oursystems do not operate properly or are disabled,including as a result of system failure, employee orcustomer error or misuse of our systems, we couldsuffer financial loss, liability to customers, regulatoryintervention or reputational damage that could affectdemand by current and potential users of our market.For example, our co-location facility hosts asignificant portion of our customers’ infrastructure.While we have undertaken measures to secure suchfacility and to implement disaster recovery measures,if we were to experience an outage at such location itcould have a significant impact on our revenues andreputation.From time to time, we have experienced systemerrors and failures that have resulted in somecustomers being unable to connect to our electronictrading platform, or that resulted in erroneousreporting, such as transactions that were notauthorized by any customer or reporting of filledorders as canceled. Such errors may result in CMEGroup being liable or in our voluntary assumption offinancial liability. We cannot assure you that if weexperience system errors or failures in the future thatthey will not have a material adverse impact on ourbusiness. Any such system failures that cause aninterruption in service or decrease our responsivenesscould impair our reputation, damage our brand nameor have a material adverse effect on our business,financial condition and operating results.Our status as a CFTC registrant generally requiresthat our trade execution and communications systemsbe able to handle anticipated present and future peakcontract volume. Heavy use of our computer systemsduring peak trading times or at times of unusualmarket volatility could cause our systems to operateslowly or even to fail for periods of time. Weconstantly monitor system loads and performance,and regularly implement system upgrades to handleestimated increases in contract volume. However, wecannot assure you that our estimates of futurecontract volume and order messaging traffic will beaccurate or that our systems will always be able toaccommodate actual contract volume and ordermessaging traffic without failure or degradation ofperformance. Increased CME Globex contractvolume and order messaging traffic may result inconnectivity problems or erroneous reports that mayaffect users of the platform. System failure ordegradation could lead our customers to file formalcomplaints with industry regulatory organizations, tofile lawsuits against us or to cease doing businesswith us, or could lead the CFTC or other regulators toinitiate inquiries or proceedings for failure to complywith applicable laws and regulations.We will need to continue to upgrade, expand andincrease the capacity of our systems as our businessgrows and we execute our business strategy.Generally, our goal is to design our systems to handletwo times our peak historical transactions in ourhighest volume products. As volumes of transactionsgrow, the ability of our systems to meet this goal onan ongoing basis depends on our ability to increaseour system capacity on a timely basis whilemaintaining system reliability. Although many of oursystems are designed to accommodate additionalvolume and products and services without redesignor replacement, we will need to continue to makesignificant investments in additional hardware andsoftware to accommodate the increases in volume oftransactions and order transaction traffic and toprovide processing services to third parties. If wecannot increase the capacity and capabilities of oursystems to accommodate an increasing volume oftransactions and to execute our business strategy, ourability to maintain or expand our businesses would beadversely affected.23
  • 34. We, as well as many of our customers, depend onthird party suppliers and service providers for anumber of services that are important. Aninterruption or cessation of an important supply orservice by any third party could have a materialadverse effect on our business, including revenuesderived from our customers’ trading activity.We depend on a number of suppliers, such asbanking, clearing and settlement organizations,telephone companies, on-line service providers, dataprocessors, and software and hardware vendors, forelements of our trading, clearing and other systems,as well as communications and networkingequipment, computer hardware and software andrelated support and maintenance.Many of our customers rely on third parties, such asindependent software vendors, to provide them withfront-end systems to access our CME Globexplatform and other back office systems for their tradeprocessing and risk management needs. While theseservice providers have undertaken to keep currentwith our enhancements and changes to our interfacesand functionality, we cannot guarantee that they willcontinue to make the necessary monetary and timeinvestments to keep up with our changes.To the extent any of our service providers or theorganizations that provide services to our customersin connection with their trading activities cease toprovide these services in an efficient, cost-effectivemanner or fail to adequately expand their services tomeet our needs and the needs of our customers, wecould experience decreased contract volume, lowerrevenues and higher costs.Our clearing house operations expose us tosubstantial credit risk of third parties and the levelof soundness of our clearing firms could adverselyaffect us.Our clearing house operations expose us to manydifferent industries and counterparties, and weroutinely guarantee transactions with counterpartiesin the financial industry, including brokers anddealers, commercial banks, investment banks, mutualand hedge funds, and other institutional customers.Over the last few years, the global financial marketshave experienced significant uncertainty and negativeconditions as a result of the continued financial crisisthat began in 2008. As a result, many of ourcustomers have encountered credit limitations, lossesresulting from lower asset values, consolidations,legislative changes and reduced liquidity. We couldbe adversely impacted by the financial distress orfailure of one of our clearing firms.As part of our overall growth initiatives, we haveexpanded our clearing services to the over-the-counter market in addition to standard futures andoptions on futures products, including productsoffered for clearing through CME ClearPort and ourcredit default swap and interest rate swap clearinginitiatives. The process for setting margins andestablishing other financial safeguards for over-the-counter products is different and, in part, seeks toassess and capture different risks than our historicalpractices applied to our futures and options on futuresproducts. Although we believe that we have carefullyanalyzed the process for setting margins and ourother financial safeguards for over-the-counterproducts, there is no guarantee that our procedureswill adequately protect market participants from theunique risks of these products or ensure that ourfinancial safeguards will suffice to cover clearingmember defaults in extreme circumstances.In 2011, CME Clearing Europe was launched. Whilewe have hired experienced management to overseethe operations of CME Clearing Europe, as anorganization we have limited experience operating aclearing house outside of the United States.A substantial part of our working capital may be atrisk if a clearing firm defaults on its obligations tothe clearing house and its margin and guaranty funddeposits are insufficient to meet its obligations.Although we have policies and procedures to helpensure that our clearing firms can satisfy theirobligations, these policies and procedures may notsucceed in detecting problems or preventing defaults.We also have in place various measures intended toenable us to cure any default and maintain liquidity.However, we cannot assure you that these measureswill be sufficient to protect market participants froma default or that we will not be adversely affected inthe event of a significant default. In addition, wehave established a $100 million fund designed toprovide payments, up to certain maximum levels, tofamily farmers, ranchers and other agriculturalindustry participants who use our products and whosuffer losses to their segregated account balanceswhen their clearing firm member becomes insolvent.24
  • 35. The required capital and posted collateral of ourclearing firms may lose value given the volatility ofthe market.To become a clearing member, a firm must meetcertain minimum capital requirements and mustdeposit a certain amount of funds to meetperformance bond and guaranty fund requirementswith our clearing house as collateral for its tradingactivity. We accept a variety of collateral to satisfythese requirements, including cash, regulated moneymarket mutual funds, U.S. Treasury securities, U.S.Government Agency securities, letters of credit, gold,equities and foreign sovereign debt, and subject themto established haircuts based on the type of collateraland maturity. Given the level of market volatility,there is no guarantee that these investments willcontinue to maintain their value. To the extent aclearing firm was not in compliance with theserequirements, it would be required to acquireadditional funds, decrease its proprietary tradingactivity and/or transfer customer accounts to anotherclearing firm. These actions could result in a decreasein trading activity in our products.Intellectual property rights licensed from third partyprice reporting agencies form the basis for many ofour products from which we derive a significantportion of our volume and revenue. Recentregulatory scrutiny into such benchmarks couldhave a negative impact on our ability to offer suchproducts.We are significantly dependent on the contractvolume of products which are based on intellectualproperty rights of indexes derived from third partyprice reporting agencies, including our benchmarkEurodollar contract which is based on LIBOR. Tocomply with CFTC core principles, we must be ableto demonstrate that our products may not be readilysubject to manipulation. Following the well-publicized issues relating to the credibility of LIBOR,there has been heightened scrutiny surrounding theintegrity and potential manipulation of LIBOR andother benchmarks which are derived from pricereporting agencies. Our inability to offer productsbased on these indexes could have a negative impacton our contract volume and revenues.Our market data revenues may be reduced oreliminated by decreased demand, overall economicconditions or the growth of electronic trading andelectronic order entry systems. If we are unable tooffset that reduction through terminal usage fees ortransaction fees, we will experience a reduction inrevenues.We sell our market data to individuals andorganizations that use our markets or monitor generaleconomic conditions. Excluding our index marketdata offerings, revenues from our market data andinformation services represented 12% and 10% ofour total revenues, during the years endedDecember 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. Adecrease in overall contract volume may also lead toa decreased demand for our market data from themarket data vendors. For example, in both 2012 and2011, we experienced a decrease in the averagenumber of market data devices due to the continuedeconomic uncertainty, continued high unemploymentlevels in the financial services sector and aggressivecost cutting initiatives at customer firms.Additionally, electronic trading systems do notusually impose separate exchange fees for supplyingmarket data to trading terminals. If we do notseparately charge for market data supplied to tradingterminals, and trading terminals with access to ourmarkets become widely available, we could losemarket data fees from those who have access totrading terminals. We will experience a reduction inour revenues if we are unable to recover that lostmarket data revenue through terminal usage fees ortransaction fees.We may have difficulty executing our growthstrategy and maintaining our growth effectively.We continue to focus on strategic initiatives to growour business, including our efforts to serve the over-the-counter market as discussed in the following riskfactor and to distribute our products and services on aglobal basis. There is no guarantee that our effortswill be successful. Continued growth will requireadditional investment in personnel, facilities,information technology infrastructure and financialand management systems and controls and may placea significant strain on our management and resources.For example, if we encounter limited resources, wemay be required to increase our expenses to obtainthe necessary resources, defer existing initiatives ornot pursue certain opportunities. We may not be25
  • 36. successful in implementing all of the processes thatare necessary to support our growth organically or, asdescribed below, through acquisitions, investments orother strategic alliances. Unless our growth results inan increase in our revenues that is proportionate tothe increase in our costs associated with our growth,our future profitability could be adversely affected,and we may have to incur significant expenditures toaddress the additional operational and controlrequirements as a result of our growth.There is no guarantee that our over-the-counterinitiatives will be successful.Our goal is to provide a comprehensive multi-assetclass clearing solution to the market for maximumoperational ease and the capital efficiency that comeswith connecting to a single clearing house. We offerclearing services for cleared over-the-counterderivatives, including credit default swaps and interestrate swaps. Our strategy also includes extending ourover-the-counter services into other assets classes, aswell as enhancing our CME ClearPort functionality tosupport additional products. While we believe theimplementation of Dodd-Frank creates newopportunities for us to expand our over-the-counterofferings, the current regulatory environment fortrading and clearing these products remainsuncertain. We cannot be certain that we will be ableto operate profitably under the new legislation. Forexample, provisions within Dodd-Frank includechanges to the CFTC’s core principles, specificallyCore Principal 9, which could require us to makemodifications to the manner in which certain of ourcontracts trade and/or require that such products be de-listed as futures and re-listed as swaps. In addition, anumber of market participants and exchanges havedeveloped competing platforms and products,including ICE’s offering for credit default swaps. Wecannot be certain that we will be able to competeeffectively or that our initiatives will be successful.We intend to continue to explore acquisitions,investments and other strategic alliances. We maynot be successful in identifying opportunities or inintegrating the acquired businesses. Any suchtransaction may not produce the results weanticipate, which could adversely affect ourbusiness and our stock price.We intend to continue to explore and pursue acquisitionsand other strategic opportunities to strengthen ourbusiness and grow our company. We may makeacquisitions or investments or enter into strategicpartnerships, joint ventures and other alliances. Themarket for such transactions is highly competitive,especially in light of the increasing consolidation in ourindustry. As a result, we may be unable to identifystrategic opportunities or we may be unable to negotiateor finance future transactions on terms favorable to us.To the extent the trend of consolidation in our industrycontinues, we may encounter increased difficulties inidentifying growth opportunities. We may finance futuretransactions by issuing additional equity and/or debt. Theissuance of additional equity in connection with anyfuture transaction could be substantially dilutive to ourexisting shareholders. The issuance of additional debtcould increase our leverage substantially. The process ofintegration may also produce unforeseen regulatory andoperating difficulties and expenditures and may divertthe attention of management from the ongoing operationof our business. To the extent we enter into jointventures and alliances, we may experience difficulties inthe development and expansion of the business of anynewly formed ventures, in the exercise of influence overthe activities of any ventures in which we do not have acontrolling interest, as well as encounter potentialconflicts with our joint venture or alliance partners. Wemay not realize the anticipated growth and other benefitsfrom strategic growth initiatives we have made or willmake in the future, which may have an adverse impacton our financial condition and operating results. We mayalso be required to take an impairment charge in ourfinancial statements relating to our acquisitions and/orinvestments, which could negatively impact our stockprice.Expansion of our operations internationally involvesspecial challenges that we may not be able to meet,which could adversely affect our financial results.We plan to continue to expand our operationsinternationally, including through CME ClearingEurope, our proposed UK exchange, directly placingorder entry terminals with customers outside theUnited States and by relying on distribution systemsestablished by our current and future strategicalliance partners. We face certain risks inherent indoing business in international markets, particularlyin the regulated derivatives exchange business. Theserisks include:• restrictions on the use of trading terminals orthe contracts that may be traded;26
  • 37. • becoming subject to extensive regulations andoversight, tariffs and other trade barriers;• difficulties in staffing and managing foreignoperations;• general economic and political conditions inthe countries from which our markets areaccessed, which may have an adverse effecton our volume from those countries; and• potentially adverse tax consequences.In addition, as a result of our expanding globaloperations, we are subject to the laws and regulationsof foreign governmental and regulatory authorities,including the FSA in connection with CME ClearingEurope, our marketing efforts in Europe and ourproposed UK exchange. These may include laws,rules and regulations relating to any aspect of thederivatives business. To date, we have had limitedexperience in marketing and operating our productsand services internationally. We cannot assure youthat we will be able to succeed in marketing ourproducts and services in international markets. Wemay also experience difficulty in managing ourinternational operations because of, among otherthings, competitive conditions overseas, managementof foreign exchange risk, established domesticmarkets, language and cultural differences andeconomic or political instability. Any of these factorscould have a material adverse effect on the success ofour international operations and, consequently, onour business, financial condition and operatingresults.Our compliance and risk management methodsmight not be effective and may result in outcomesthat could adversely affect our reputation, financialcondition and operating results.In the normal course of our business, we discussmatters with our regulators raised during regulatoryexaminations or we may otherwise become subject totheir inquiry and oversight. The CFTC has broadenforcement powers to censure, fine, issue cease-and-desist orders, prohibit us from engaging in some ofour businesses or suspend or revoke our designationas a contract market or the registration of any of ourofficers or employees who violate applicable laws orregulations. Our ability to comply with applicablelaws and rules is largely dependent on ourestablishment and maintenance of compliance,review and reporting systems, as well as our ability toattract and retain qualified compliance and other riskmanagement personnel. We face the risk ofsignificant intervention by regulatory authorities,including extensive examination and surveillanceactivity. In the case of non-compliance or allegednon-compliance with applicable laws or regulations,we could be subject to investigations and judicial oradministrative proceedings that may result insubstantial penalties or civil lawsuits, including bycustomers, for damages, which could be significant.Any of these outcomes may adversely affect ourreputation, financial condition and operating results.In extreme cases, these outcomes could adverselyaffect our ability to conduct our business. In February2013, the CFTC filed suit against NYMEX and twoformer employees alleging disclosure of confidentialcustomer information in violation of the CommodityExchange Act. Based on our initial review of thecomplaint, we believe that we have strong factual andlegal defenses to the claim.Our policies and procedures to identify, monitor andmanage our risks may not be fully effective. Some ofour risk management methods depend uponevaluation of information regarding markets,customers or other matters that are publicly availableor otherwise accessible by us. That information maynot in all cases be accurate, complete, up-to-date orproperly evaluated. Management of operational,financial, legal, regulatory and strategic risk requires,among other things, policies and procedures to recordproperly and verify a large number of transactionsand events. We cannot assure you that our policiesand procedures will always be effective or that wewill always be successful in monitoring or evaluatingthe risks to which we are or may be exposed.We could be harmed by misconduct or errors thatare difficult to detect and deter.There have been a number of highly publicized casesinvolving fraud or other misconduct by employees offinancial services firms in recent years. Misconductby our employees and agents, including employees ofGFX, our wholly-owned subsidiary that engagesprimarily in proprietary trading in foreign exchangefutures to generate liquidity, could include hidingunauthorized activities from us, improper orunauthorized activities on behalf of customers orimproper use or unauthorized disclosure ofconfidential information. Misconduct could subject27
  • 38. us to financial losses or regulatory sanctions andseriously harm our reputation. It is not alwayspossible to deter misconduct, and the precautions wetake to prevent and detect this activity may not beeffective in all cases. Our employees and agents alsomay commit errors that could subject us to financialclaims for negligence, as well as regulatory actions,or result in our voluntary assumption of financialliability.We may not be able to protect our intellectualproperty rights, which may materially harm ourbusiness.We own the rights to a large number of trademarks,service marks, domain names and trade names in theUnited States, Europe and other parts of the world. Wehave registered many of our most important trademarksin the United States and other countries. We hold therights to a number of patents and have made a numberof patent applications. Our patents cover match engine,trader user interface, trading floor support, market data,general technology and clearing house functionalities.We attempt to protect our intellectual property rightsby relying on trademarks, copyright, database rights,trade secrets, restrictions on disclosure and othermethods. Notwithstanding the precautions we take toprotect our intellectual property rights, it is possiblethat third parties may copy or otherwise obtain and useour proprietary technology without authorization orotherwise infringe on our rights. For example, in 2012a former employee of CME Group plead guilty to theftof our trade secrets. In addition, in the future, we mayhave to rely on litigation to enforce our intellectualproperty rights, protect our trade secrets, determine thevalidity and scope of the proprietary rights of others ordefend against claims of infringement or invalidity.Any such litigation, whether successful orunsuccessful, could result in substantial costs to us anddiversions of our resources, either of which couldadversely affect our business.Any infringement by us on patent rights of others couldresult in litigation and adversely affect our ability tocontinue to provide, or increase the cost of providing,our products and electronic execution services.Patents of third parties may have an importantbearing on our ability to offer certain of our productsand services. Our competitors as well as othercompanies and individuals may obtain, and may beexpected to obtain in the future, patents related to thetypes of products and services we offer or plan tooffer. We cannot assure you that we are or will beaware of all patents containing claims that may posea risk of infringement by our products and services.In addition, some patent applications in the UnitedStates are confidential until a patent is issued and,therefore, we cannot evaluate the extent to which ourproducts and services may be covered or asserted tobe covered by claims contained in pending patentapplications. These claims of infringement are notuncommon in our industry.In general, if one or more of our products or serviceswere to infringe on patents held by others, we may berequired to stop developing or marketing the productsor services, to obtain licenses to develop and marketthe services from the holders of the patents or toredesign the products or services in such a way as toavoid infringing on the patent claims. We cannotassess the extent to which we may be required in thefuture to obtain licenses with respect to patents heldby others, whether such licenses would be availableor, if available, whether we would be able to obtainsuch licenses on commercially reasonable terms. Ifwe were unable to obtain such licenses, we may notbe able to redesign our products or services to avoidinfringement, which could materially adversely affectour business, financial condition and operatingresults.RISKS RELATING TO AN INVESTMENT INOUR CLASS A COMMON STOCKOur indebtedness could adversely affect ourfinancial condition and operations and prevent usfrom fulfilling our debt service obligations. We maystill be able to incur more debt, intensifying theserisks.As of December 31, 2012, we had approximately$2.9 billion of total indebtedness and we had excessborrowing capacity for general corporate purposesunder our existing facilities of approximately $1.8billion.Our indebtedness could have importantconsequences. For example, our indebtedness may:• require us to dedicate a significant portion ofour cash flow from operations to payments onour debt, thereby reducing the availability of28
  • 39. cash flows to fund capital expenditures, topursue acquisitions or investments, to paydividends and for general corporate purposes;• increase our vulnerability to general adverseeconomic conditions;• limit our flexibility in planning for, orreacting to, changes in or challenges relatingto our business and industry; and• place us at a competitive disadvantage againstany less leveraged competitors.The occurrence of any one of these events could havea material adverse effect on our business, financialcondition, results of operations, prospects and abilityto satisfy our debt service obligations. In addition, theagreements governing our outstanding indebtednessdo not significantly limit our ability to incuradditional indebtedness, which could increase therisks described above to the extent that we incuradditional debt. Our exchanges and clearing houseare also required to maintain capital as defined by theCFTC at least equal to six months of their applicableoperating expenses.Any reduction in our credit rating could increasethe cost of our funding from the capital markets.Our long-term debt is currently rated investmentgrade by two of the major rating agencies. Theserating agencies regularly evaluate us. Their ratings ofour long-term debt are based on a number of factors,including our financial strength as well as factors notentirely within our control, such as conditionsaffecting the financial services industry generally. InFebruary 2012, S&P lowered our rating to AA- witha negative outlook from AA with a negative outlook.The ratings action stemmed from the newly providedprotection we extended to trading customers ofdefaulted clearing member firms. The continuednegative outlook reflects S&P’s view of the potentiallegal and reputational fall-out from the MF Globalbankruptcy. In light of the difficulties in the financialservices industry and the financial markets over thelast few years, there can be no assurance that we willmaintain our current ratings. Our failure to maintainthose ratings could adversely affect the cost and otherterms upon which we are able to obtain funding andincrease our cost of capital.Our investment in BM&FBOVESPA subjects us toinvestment and currency risk.We own an interest in BM&FBOVESPArepresenting approximately 5% of its outstandingshares, which had a fair value of $690.6 million as ofDecember 31, 2012. As an exchange, its ability tomaintain or expand its contract volume and operateits business is subject to the same types of risks towhich we are subject. Additionally, its stock isvalued in Brazilian real, which subjects us tocurrency risk. There is no guarantee that ourinvestment in BM&FBOVESPA will be profitable.Any impairment of our goodwill and otherintangible assets or investments may result inmaterial, non-cash writedowns and could have amaterial adverse impact on our results of operationsand shareholders’ equity.In connection with our acquisitions and investments,including our mergers with CBOT Holdings andNYMEX Holdings, we have recorded goodwill andidentifiable intangible assets. We assess goodwill andintangible assets for impairment by applying a fairvalue test looking at historical performance, capitalrequirements and projected cash flows on an annualbasis or more frequently if indicators of impairmentarise. In the past, we have recorded impairmentcharges in connection with some of our investments,including our investment in BM&FBOVESPA. Wemay continue to experience future events that resultin impairments. The risk of impairment losses mayincrease to the extent our market capitalization andearnings decline. An impairment of the value of ourexisting goodwill and intangible assets could have asignificant negative impact on our future operatingresults and could have an adverse impact on ourability to satisfy the financial ratios or othercovenants under our existing or future debtagreements.Our quarterly operating results fluctuate due toseasonality. As a result, you will not be able to relyon our operating results in any particular quarter asan indication of our future performance.We have historically experienced relatively highercontract volume during the first and second quartersand sequentially lower contract volume in the thirdand fourth quarters. As a result of this seasonality,you will not be able to rely on our operating results in29
  • 40. any particular period as an indication of our futureperformance. If we fail to meet securities analysts’expectations regarding our operating results, the priceof our Class A common stock could declinesubstantially.Our average rate per contract is subject tofluctuation due to a number of factors. As a result,you will not be able to rely on our average rate percontract in any particular period as an indication ofour future average rate per contract.Our average rate per contract, which impacts ouroperating results, is subject to fluctuation due toshifts in the mix of products traded, the trading venueand the mix of customers (whether the customerreceives member or non-member fees or participatesin one of our various incentive programs) and theimpact of our tiered pricing structure. For example,we earn a higher rate per contract for trades executedelectronically than for trades executed on the tradingfloor. In addition, our members and participants inour various incentive programs generally are chargedlower fees than our non-member customers.Variation in each of these factors is difficult topredict and will have an impact on our average rateper contract in the particular period. Because of thisfluctuation, you may not be able to rely on ouraverage rate per contract in any particular period asan indication of our future average rate per contract.If we fail to meet securities analysts’ expectationsregarding our operating results, the price of ourClass A common stock could decline substantially.Our cost structure is largely fixed. If our revenuesdecline and we are unable to reduce our costs, ourprofitability will be adversely affected.Our cost structure is largely fixed. We base our coststructure on historical and expected levels of demandfor our products and services. If demand for ourproducts and services and our resulting revenuesdecline, we may not be able to adjust our coststructure on a timely basis. In that event, ourprofitability will be adversely affected.Eighteen of our board members own trading rightsor are officers or directors of firms who own tradingrights on our exchanges. As members, theseindividuals may have interests that differ from orconflict with those of shareholders who are not alsomembers. Our dependence on the trading andclearing activities of our members, combined withtheir rights to elect directors, may enable them toexert substantial influence over the operation of ourbusiness.Eighteen of our directors own or are officers ordirectors of firms that own trading rights on ourexchanges. We are dependent on the revenues fromthe trading and clearing activities of our members. In2012, 79% of our contract volume was derived fromour members. This dependence may give themsubstantial influence over how we operate ourbusiness.Many of our members and clearing firms derive asubstantial portion of their income from their tradingor clearing activities on or through our exchanges. Inaddition, trading rights on our exchanges havesubstantial independent value. The amount of incomethat members derive from their trading, brokeringand clearing activities and the value of their tradingrights are, in part, dependent on the fees they arecharged to trade, broker, clear and access ourmarkets, and the rules and structure of our markets.As a result, holders of our Class A common stockmay not have the same economic interests as ourmembers. In addition, our members may havediffering interests among themselves depending onthe roles they serve in our markets, their method oftrading and the products they trade. Consequently,members may advocate that we enhance and protecttheir clearing and trading opportunities and the valueof their trading privileges over their investment inour Class A common stock, if any.Our members and permit holders have been grantedspecial rights, which protect their trading privileges,require that we maintain open outcry trading untilvolumes are not significant and, in the case of ourClass B shareholders, provide them with specialboard representation.Under the terms of the organizational documents ofour exchanges and in connection with our agreementto acquire KCBT, our members and permit holdershave certain rights that relate primarily to trading30
  • 41. right protections, certain trading fee protections andcertain membership benefit protections. Additionally,our Class B shareholders, who are members of ourCME exchange, are also entitled to elect six directorsto our board; even if their Class A share ownershipinterest is very small or non-existent. In connectionwith these rights, our ability to take certain actionsthat we may deem to be in the best interests of thecompany and its shareholders, including actionsrelating to the operation of our open outcry tradingfacilities and certain pricing decisions, may belimited by the rights of our members.ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTSNot applicable.ITEM 2. PROPERTIESOur global headquarters are located in Chicago, Illinois, at 20 South Wacker Drive. The following is adescription of our key locations and facilities.Location Primary UseOwned/Leased Lease ExpirationApproximate Size(in square feet)(1)20 South Wacker DriveChicago, IllinoisGlobal headquarters and officespace Leased 2022(2) 490,000141 West JacksonChicago, IllinoisChicago trading floor andoffice space Leased 2027(3) 150,000333 S. LaSalleChicago, IllinoisChicago trading floor andoffice space Owned N/A 300,000550 West WashingtonChicago, IllinoisOffice spaceLeased 2023 250,000One North EndNew York, New YorkNew York trading floor andoffice space Mixed(4) 2069 500,000(5)One New Change London Office space Leased 2026 40,000Annex Data CenterChicagoland areaBusiness continuityLeased 2019 100,000Remote Data CenterChicagoland areaBusiness continuityLeased 2017 50,000Data Center 3Chicagoland areaBusiness continuity and co-location Owned N/A 430,0004800 Main StreetKansas City, MissouriKansas City trading floor andoffice space Mixed(6) N/A 166,000(1) Size represents the amount of space leased or owned by us unless otherwise noted.(2) The initial lease expires in 2022 with two consecutive options to extend the term for seven and ten years,respectively.(3) The initial lease expires in 2027 and contains options to extend the term and expand the premises.(4) The One North End property is subject to a ground lease with the Battery Park City Authority for the site ofour New York offices and trading facility. In accordance with the terms of the lease, we are deemed to leasethe building and its improvements from the landlord. We do not make lease payments to the landlord relatedto the building and we receive the financial benefit of the rental income.31
  • 42. (5) We occupy approximately 350,000 square feet of the One North End Building.(6) This property is owned by Board of Trade Investment Company (BOTIC). KCBT maintains a 51%controlling interest in BOTIC.We also lease other office space around the worldand have also partnered with major globaltelecommunications carriers in connection with ourtelecommunications hubs whereby we place datacabinets within the carriers’ existing secured datacenters. We believe our facilities are adequate for ourcurrent operations and that additional space can beobtained if needed.ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGSSee “Legal and Regulatory Matters” in Note 14.Contingencies to the Consolidated FinancialStatements beginning on page 91 for CME Group’slegal proceedings disclosure which is incorporatedherein by reference.ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURESNot applicable.PART IIITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDERMATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIESClass A Common StockOur Class A common stock is currently listed onNASDAQ under the ticker symbol “CME.” As ofFebruary 13, 2013, there were approximately 3,106holders of record of our Class A common stock.In May 2012, the company’s board of directorsdeclared a five-for-one split of its Class A commonstock effected by way of a stock dividend to itsClass A and Class B shareholders. The stock splitwas effective July 20, 2012 for all shareholders ofrecord on July 10, 2012. As a result of the stock split,all amounts related to shares and per share amountshave been retroactively restated.The following table sets forth the high and low sales prices per share of our Class A common stock on a quarterlybasis, as reported on NASDAQ.2012 High Low 2011 High LowFirst Quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59.73 $45.20 First Quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $63.40 $56.06Second Quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58.24 50.70 Second Quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62.15 52.45Third Quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59.35 49.83 Third Quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59.80 47.43Fourth Quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57.89 50.12 Fourth Quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59.73 45.20Class B Common StockOur Class B common stock is not listed on a nationalsecurities exchange or traded in an organized over-the-counter market. Each class of our Class Bcommon stock is associated with a membership in aspecific division of our CME exchange. CME’s rulesprovide exchange members with trading rights andthe ability to use or lease these trading rights. Eachshare of our Class B common stock can betransferred only in connection with the transfer of theassociated trading rights.32
  • 43. Class B shares and the associated trading rights arebought and sold or leased through our shareholderrelations and membership services department.Although our Class B shareholders have specialvoting rights, because our Class B shares have thesame equitable interest in our earnings and the samedividend payments as our Class A shares, we expectthat the market price of our Class B common stock, ifreported separately from the associated trading rights,would be determined by the value of our Class Acommon stock. As of February 13, 2013, there wereapproximately 1,697 holders of record of our Class Bcommon stock.DividendsThe following table sets forth the dividends we paid on our Class A and Class B common stock in the last twoyears:Record Date Dividend per Share Record Date Dividend per ShareMarch 10, 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.45 March 10, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.28March 10, 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.60 June 10, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.28June 10, 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.45 September 10, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.28September 10, 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.45 December 10, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.28December 10, 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.45December 17, 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.30We intend to continue to pay a regular quarterlydividend to our shareholders according to our annualdividend policy, which remains at approximately50% of the prior year’s cash earnings. The decisionto declare a dividend, however, remains within thediscretion of our board of directors and may beaffected by various factors, including our futureearnings, financial condition, capital requirements,levels of indebtedness and other considerations ourboard of directors deems relevant. On January 30,2013, the board of directors declared a regularquarterly dividend of $0.45 per share. The dividendwill be payable on March 25, 2013, to shareholdersof record on March 8, 2013. Assuming no changes inthe number of shares outstanding, the total firstquarter dividend payment will be approximately$149.3 million. The board of directors declared anannual variable dividend of $1.30 per share onDecember 5, 2012 and was payable on December 28,2012 to the shareholders of record on December 17,2012. In general, the amount of the annual variabledividend will be determined after the end of eachyear, and the level will increase or decrease fromyear to year based on operating results, potentialmerger and acquisition activity, and other forms ofcapital return including regular dividends and sharebuybacks during the prior year. The annual variabledividend for 2013 was accelerated to the fourthquarter of 2012 due to uncertainty surroundingdividend income tax treatment beginning in 2013.The indentures governing our fixed rate notes, our364-day clearing house credit facility for $5.0 billionand our $1.8 billion multi-currency revolving seniorcredit facility, do not contain specific covenants thatrestrict the ability to pay dividends. Thesedocuments, however, do contain other customaryfinancial and operating covenants that placerestrictions on the operations of the company, whichcould indirectly affect the ability to pay dividends.For example, under our senior credit facility, we arerequired to remain in compliance with a consolidatednet worth test, defined as our consolidatedshareholders’ equity as of September 30, 2012 aftergiving effect to actual share repurchases made andspecial dividends paid (including annual variabledividends), but only up to the amount of suchrepurchases and dividends publicly announced andmade or paid after September 30, 2012 (and in noevent greater than $2.0 billion in the aggregate forsuch repurchases and dividends during the term ofthe agreement), multiplied by 0.65. In addition, our364-day clearing house credit facility contains arequirement that CME remain in compliance with aconsolidated tangible net worth test, defined asconsolidated shareholder’s equity less intangibleassets (as defined in the agreement), of not less than$625.0 million.CME Group, as a holding company, has nooperations of its own. Instead, it relies on dividends33
  • 44. declared and paid to it by its subsidiaries, includingCME, in order to provide a portion of the fundswhich it uses to pay dividends to its shareholders.CME Group and its subsidiaries are also required tocomply with restrictions contained in the generalcorporation laws of their state of incorporation whichcould also limit its (or their) ability to declare andpay dividends.PERFORMANCE GRAPHThe following graph and table compares the cumulative five-year total return provided shareholders on ourClass A common stock relative to the cumulative total returns of the S&P 500 index and our customized peergroup. The peer group includes CBOE Holdings, Inc., IntercontinentalExchange, Inc., NYSE Euronext and TheNasdaq OMX Group Inc. An investment of $100 (with reinvestment of all dividends) is assumed to have beenmade in our Class A common stock, in the peer group and the S&P 500 index on December 31, 2007 and itsrelative performance is tracked through December 31, 2012.204060801001401202007 2008 2009 201220112010DollarCME Group Inc.S&P 500Peer Group* $100 invested on 12/31/07 in stock or index, including reinvestment of dividends.Fiscal year ending December 31.Copyright© 2013 S&P, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. All rights reserved.The stock price performance included in this graph is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance2008 2009 2010 2011 2012CME Group Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31.07 $51.04 $49.64 $38.39 $ 42.38S&P 500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63.00 79.67 91.67 93.61 108.59Peer Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37.87 39.89 45.92 45.66 50.98Unregistered Sales of Equity SecuritiesOn July 16, 2010, in connection with a definitiveShare Purchase and Investor Rights Agreement,dated June 22, 2010, we issued to BM&FBOVESPA11.0 million shares of our Class A common stock at apurchase price per share of $55.02 in cash, orapproximately $607.0 million in the aggregate. Theshares of our Class A common stock issued in thesetransactions were unregistered and were issued inreliance on Section 4(2) of the Securities Act.34
  • 45. Issuer Purchases of Equity SecuritiesPeriod(a) Total Numberof Shares (orUnits)Purchased(1)(b) Average PricePaid Per Share(or Unit)(c) Total Number ofShares (or Units)Purchased asPart of PubliclyAnnouncedPlans or Programs(d) Maximum Number (orApproximate DollarValue) of Shares (orUnits) that MayYet Be Purchased Underthe Plans or Programs(in millions)October 1 to October 31 . . . . . . . . — $ — — $—November 1 to November 30 . . . . — — — —December 1 to December 31 . . . . 9,375 51.23 — —Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,375 —(1) Shares purchased consist of an aggregate of 9,375 shares of Class A common stock surrendered to satisfyemployee tax obligations upon the vesting of restricted stock.ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATAOn March 23, 2008, CME Group Inc. (CME Group) acquired Credit Market Analysis Ltd., a private companyincorporated in the United Kingdom, and its wholly-owned subsidiaries (collectively, CMA). On August 22,2008, NYMEX Holdings, Inc. (NYMEX Holdings) merged with CME Group. On March 18, 2010, the Board ofTrade of the City of Chicago, Inc. (CBOT) acquired a 90% ownership interest in CME Group Index ServicesLLC (Index Services), a business venture with Dow Jones & Company (Dow Jones). In June 2012, the companycontributed certain Dow Jones Index assets and liabilities (DJI asset group) owned by Index Services to a newbusiness venture with The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. (McGraw) and acquired a 24.4% interest in the newbusiness venture. As part of the transaction with McGraw, the company also sold CMA to McGraw. CBOTacquired The Board of Trade of Kansas City, Missouri, Inc. (KCBT), on November 30, 2012.The following data includes the financial results of CMA from March 24, 2008 through June 30, 2012, thefinancial results of NYMEX Holdings beginning August 23, 2008 and the financial results of KCBT beginningNovember 30, 2012. Assets and liabilities contributed or sold as part of the transaction with McGraw areexcluded from the following data beginning on June 30, 2012, while the financial results of the company’s 24.4%interest in the new business venture with McGraw are included in the following data beginning on June 30, 2012.Year Ended or At December 31(in millions, except per share data) 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008Income Statement Data:Total revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,914.6 $ 3,280.6 $ 3,003.7 $ 2,612.8 $ 2,561.0Operating income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,692.0 2,021.1 1,831.1 1,589.1 1,582.2Non-operating income (expense) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4 (84.6) (109.2) (151.6) (334.2)Income before income taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,693.4 1,936.5 1,721.9 1,437.5 1,248.0Net income attributable to CME Group . . . . . . . . . 896.3 1,812.3 951.4 825.8 715.5Earnings per common share attributable to CMEGroup:Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2.71 $ 5.45 $ 2.87 $ 2.49 $ 2.44Diluted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.70 5.43 2.86 2.48 2.43Cash dividends per share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.70 1.12 0.92 0.92 1.92Balance Sheet Data:Total assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,863.2 $40,758.7 $35,046.1 $35,651.0 $48,158.7Short-term debt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 749.7 — 420.5 299.8 249.9Long-term debt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,106.8 2,106.8 2,104.8 2,014.7 2,966.1CME Group Shareholders’ equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21,419.1 21,552.0 20,060.1 19,301.0 18,688.635
  • 46. The following table presents key statistical information on the volume of contracts traded, expressed in roundturn trades, and notional value of contracts traded. The 2008 volume data includes average daily volume forNYMEX products for the period August 23 through December 31, 2008. The 2012 volume data includes theaverage daily volume for KCBT products beginning November 30, 2012. All amounts exclude our credit defaultswaps, interest rate swaps, KCBT, CME Clearing Europe, TRAKRS, and Swapstream contracts.Year Ended or At December 31(in thousands, except notional value) 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008Average Daily Volume:Product Lines:Interest rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,834 6,030 5,449 4,260 6,085Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,560 3,238 2,907 2,916 3,663Foreign exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845 922 919 624 623Agricultural commodity (1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,140 1,087 914 741 848Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,692 1,775 1,662 1,492 1,348Metal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 387 316 225 208Total Average Daily Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,423 13,439 12,167 10,258 12,775Method of Trade:Electronic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,739 11,350 10,120 8,290 10,180Open outcry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,045 1,398 1,402 1,310 1,943Privately negotiated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 231 198 164 208CME ClearPort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 460 447 494 444Total Average Daily Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,423 13,439 12,167 10,258 12,775Other Data:Total Notional Value (in trillions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 806 1,068 994 813 1,227Total Contract Volume (round turn trades) . . . . . . . 2,890,036 3,386,716 3,078,149 2,584,891 2,978,459Open Interest at Year End (contracts) . . . . . . . . . . . 69,894 78,318 84,873 78,102 63,049(1) Agricultural commodities does not include the agricultural commodity contract volume for KCBT. Theaverage daily volume for KCBT’s agricultural commodity contracts was 16,100 for December 1, 2012through December 31, 2012.ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION ANDRESULTS OF OPERATIONSINTRODUCTIONManagement’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations is organized as follows:• Executive Summary: Includes an overview of our business; current economic, competitive andregulatory trends relevant to our business; our current business strategy; and our primary sources ofoperating and non-operating revenues and expenses.• Critical Accounting Policies: Provides an explanation of accounting policies which may have a significantimpact on our financial results and the estimates, assumptions and risks associated with those policies.• Recent Accounting Pronouncements: Includes an evaluation of recent accounting pronouncements andthe potential impact of their future adoption on our financial results.• Results of Operations: Includes an analysis of our 2012, 2011 and 2010 financial results and adiscussion of any known events or trends which are likely to impact future results.• Liquidity and Capital Resources: Includes a discussion of our future cash requirements, capitalresources, significant planned expenditures and financing arrangements.36
  • 47. In March 2010, the Board of Trade of the City ofChicago, Inc. (CBOT) acquired a 90% ownershipinterest in CME Group Index Services LLC (IndexServices), a business venture with Dow Jones &Company (Dow Jones). The discussion and analysisthat follow includes the financial results of IndexServices beginning March 19, 2010.In June 2012, CBOT contributed certain assets andliabilities (DJI asset group) owned by Index Servicesto S&P/Dow Jones Indices LLC (S&P/DJI), a newbusiness venture with The McGraw-Hill CompaniesInc. (McGraw). In addition, Credit Market AnalysisLtd. (CMA) was sold to McGraw as part of thistransaction. The discussion and analysis that followsexcludes the assets and liabilities disposed as part ofthis transaction with McGraw beginning June 30,2012.In November 2012, CBOT acquired The Board ofTrade of Kansas City, Missouri, Inc. (KCBT),including its wholly-owned clearing house, KansasCity Board of Trade Clearing Corporation(KCBTCC) and its 51% controlling interest in Boardof Trade Investment Company (BOTIC). Thediscussion and analysis that follows includes thefinancial results of KCBT beginning November 30,2012.References in this discussion and analysis to “we”and “our” are to CME Group Inc. (CME Group) andits consolidated subsidiaries, collectively. Referencesto “exchange” are to Chicago Mercantile ExchangeInc. (CME), CBOT and New York MercantileExchange, Inc. (NYMEX), Commodity Exchange,Inc. (COMEX) and KCBT, collectively, unlessotherwise noted.OVERVIEWBusiness OverviewCME Group, a Delaware stock corporation, is theholding company for CME, CBOT, NYMEX andtheir respective subsidiaries as well as CME ClearingEurope Limited (CMECE). The holding companystructure is designed to provide strategic andoperational flexibility. CME Group’s Class Acommon stock is listed on the NASDAQ GlobalSelect Market (NASDAQ) under the ticker symbol“CME.”Our exchange consists of designated contract marketsfor the trading of futures and options on futurescontracts. We also clear futures, options on futuresand over-the-counter contracts through our threedesignated clearing organizations: CME Clearing,which is a division of CME, KCBTCC and CMECE.Futures contracts and options on futures contractsprovide investors with vehicles for protecting against,and potentially profiting from, price changes infinancial instruments and physical commodities.We are a global exchange with customer accessavailable virtually all over the world. Our customersconsist of professional traders, financial institutions,individual and institutional investors, majorcorporations, manufacturers, producers andgovernments. Customers include both members ofthe exchange and non-members.We offer our customers the opportunity to tradefutures contracts and options on futures contracts ona range of products including those based on interestrates, equities, foreign exchange, agriculturalcommodities, energy, and metals. We also clear over-the-counter contracts on a range of product linesincluding interest rate swaps, credit default swaps,foreign exchange, energy and agriculturalcommodities.Our products provide a means for hedging,speculating and allocating assets. We identify newproducts by monitoring economic trends and theirimpact on the risk management and speculative needsof our existing and prospective customers.Our major product lines are traded through ourelectronic trading platform and our open outcrytrading floors. These execution facilities offer ourcustomers immediate trade execution and pricetransparency. In addition, trades can be executedthrough privately negotiated transactions that arecleared and settled through our CME and CMECEclearing houses.Our clearing houses clear, settle and guarantee everyfutures and options contract traded through ourexchanges, in addition to cleared over-the-counterproducts. Our clearing house performance guaranteeis an important function of our business. Because ofthis guarantee, our customers do not need to evaluatethe credit of each potential counterparty or limitthemselves to a selected set of counterparties. This37
  • 48. flexibility increases the potential liquidity availablefor each trade. Additionally, the substitution of ourclearing houses as the counterparty to everytransaction allows our customers to establish aposition with one party and offset the position withanother party. This contract offsetting processprovides our customers with flexibility inestablishing and adjusting positions and provides forcollateral and margining efficiencies.Business TrendsEconomic Environment. Our customers continue touse our markets as an effective and transparent meansto manage risk and meet their investment needsdespite recent economic uncertainty and volatility. Inrecent years, trading activity in our centralizedmarkets has fluctuated due to the ongoing uncertaintyin the financial markets caused by the United Statesand European credit crises, fluctuations in theavailability of credit, variations in the amount ofassets under management as well as the FederalReserve Bank’s continued zero interest rate policy.We continue to maintain high quality and diverseproducts as well as various clearing and market dataservices which support our customers in anyeconomic environment.Competitive Environment. Our industry is highlycompetitive and we continue to encountercompetition in all aspects of our business. We expectcompetition to continue to intensify, especially inlight of recent regulatory reforms in the financialservices industry. Competition is influenced byliquidity and transparency of the markets, variabilityin fee structures, breadth of product offeringsincluding quality of new product development aswell as efficient and innovative technology. We nowface competition from other futures, securities andsecurities option exchanges; over-the-countermarkets; clearing organizations; consortia formed byour members and large market participants;alternative trade execution facilities; technologyfirms, including market data distributors andelectronic trading system developers, and others. Asthe market continues to evolve, we have worked toadapt our trading technology and clearing services tomeet the needs of our customers.Regulatory Environment. Exchange-tradedderivatives have historically been subject to extensiveregulation. As a result of the widespread difficultiesacross the economy over recent years, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer ProtectionAct (Dodd-Frank) was signed into law in July 2010.Dodd-Frank is a comprehensive banking andfinancial services reform package that includessignificant changes to the oversight of the derivativesmarkets, both over-the-counter and exchange-traded.While we believe that the new regulations willprovide opportunities for our business, the newregulations remain subject to additional rulemakingby various regulators. To the extent the regulatoryenvironment following the implementation of thenew legislation and other financial reform regulationsis less beneficial for us or our customers, ourbusiness, financial condition and operating resultscould be negatively impacted. We continue toactively participate in the rulemaking process withthe goal that the final regulations serve the publicinterest, foster competition and innovation and do notplace the U.S. financial services sector at acompetitive disadvantage. Pursuant to Dodd-Frank,in July 2012, the Financial Stability OversightCouncil has designated CME as a systemicallyimportant financial market utility because it isoperating as a U.S. clearing house. This designationcreates additional regulatory oversight over our risk-management standards, clearing, and settlementactivities.As a global company with operations and locationsaround the world, we are also subject to laws andregulations in foreign locations where we dobusiness. The financial services industry in Europe isalso undergoing similar regulatory reform, whichcould result in additional regulation over ourEuropean operations.Business StrategyOur strategy focuses on leveraging our benchmarkproducts, enhancing our customer relations,expanding our customer base, advancing our clearingand trading technologies, and deriving benefits fromour integrated clearing houses as well as our scalableinfrastructure. We focus specifically on opportunitiescreated by increased market awareness andacceptance of derivatives, increased price volatility,technological advances and the increasing need forcounterparty risk mitigation and clearing services.This strategy allows us to continue to develop into amore broadly diversified financial exchange thatprovides trading and clearing solutions across a wide38
  • 49. range of products and asset classes. We believe thatwe can build on our competitive strengths byexecuting on the following initiatives:• Grow our core business by launching newproducts, expanding our existing benchmarkproduct lines as well as improving ourcustomer relations in order to cross-sell ourproducts;• Globalize our business by expanding ourpresence in Europe as well as diversifying ourworldwide customer base through strategicinvestments and relationships with other keyexchanges and intermediaries around theworld, including Asia, Latin America andother emerging markets, which allows us toaccelerate our market penetration andimprove product sales channels;• Expand our existing customer base andenhance our products and services offeringsby targeting cross asset sales, drivinginternational sales and generating new clientparticipation across the world;• Offer a comprehensive multi-asset classclearing solution to the over-the-countermarket that maximizes operational efficiency,as well as expand our over-the-counterproduct offerings and clearing services;• Establish ourselves as the leading exchangeprovider of information products and indexservices, which will allow us to createadditional cross-listing opportunities and newopportunities for index creation. It will alsoallow us to create opportunities for licensingacross global markets as well as expandingmarket data dissemination services to ourglobal network of clients and exchangepartners; andRevenuesClearing and transaction fees. A majority of ourrevenue is derived from clearing and transaction fees,which include electronic trading fees, surcharges forprivately-negotiated transactions and other volume-related charges for contracts executed through ourtrading venues. Because clearing and transaction feesare assessed on a per-contract basis, revenues andprofitability fluctuate with changes in contractvolume. In addition to the business trends notedearlier, our contract volume, and consequently ourrevenues, tend to increase during periods ofeconomic and geopolitical uncertainty as ourcustomers seek to manage their exposure to, orspeculate on, the market volatility resulting fromuncertainty.While volume has the most significant impact on ourclearing and transaction fees revenue, there are fourother factors that also influence this source ofrevenues:• rate structure;• product mix;• venue, and• the percentage of trades executed bycustomers who are members compared withnon-member customers.Rate structure. Customers benefit from volumediscounts and limits on fees as part of our effort toincrease liquidity in certain products. We offervarious incentive programs to promote trading invarious products and geographic locations. We mayperiodically change fees, volume discounts, limits onfees, and member discounts, perhaps significantly,based on our review of operations and the businessenvironment.Product mix. We offer trading of futures and optionson futures contracts as well as cleared-only swapcontracts on a wide-ranging set of products based oninterest rates, equities, foreign exchange, agriculturalcommodities, energy and metals. Rates are varied byproduct in order to optimize revenue on existingproducts and to encourage contract volume uponintroduction of new products.Venue. Our exchange is an international marketplacethat brings together buyers and sellers mainlythrough our electronic trading and clearing platformsas well as through open outcry trading on our tradingfloors and privately negotiated transactions. Anycustomer who is guaranteed by a clearing firm andwho agrees to be bound by our exchange rules is ableto obtain direct access to our electronic platforms.Open outcry trading is conducted exclusively by ourmembers, who may execute trades on behalf ofcustomers or for themselves.39
  • 50. Typically, customers submitting trades through ourelectronic platforms are charged fees for using theplatforms in addition to the fees assessed on alltransactions executed on our exchange. Customersentering into privately negotiated transactions alsoincur additional charges beyond the fees assessed onother transactions. Privately negotiated transactionsinclude block trades, which are large transactions thatare executed between selected parties off the publicauction market on CME Globex or the trading floor.Member/non-member mix. Generally, membercustomers are charged lower fees than our non-member customers. Holding all other factorsconstant, revenue decreases if the percentage oftrades executed by members increases, and increasesif the percentage of non-member trades increases.Other sources. Revenue is also derived from othersources including market data and informationservices, access and communication fees and variousservices related to our exchange and buildingoperations.Market data and information services. We receivemarket data and information services revenue fromthe dissemination of our market data to subscribers.Subscribers can obtain access to our market dataservices either directly or through third-partydistributors.Our service offerings include access to real-time,delayed and end-of-day quotations, trade andsummary market data for our products and other datasources. Users of our basic service receive real-timequotes and pay a flat monthly fee for each screen, ordevice, displaying our market data. Alternatively,customers can subscribe to market data provided on alimited group of products. The fee for this service isalso a flat rate per month.Pricing for our market data services is based on thevalue of the service provided, our cost structure for theservice and the price of comparable services offered byour competitors. Increases or decreases in our marketdata and information services revenue are influencedby changes in our price structure for existing marketdata offerings, introduction of new market data servicesand changes in the number of devices in use. Generaleconomic factors that affect the financial servicesindustry, which constitutes our primary customer base,also influence revenue from our market data services.Access and communication fees. Access andcommunication fees are the connectivity charges tocustomers of the CME Globex platform, to ourmarket data vendors and to direct market datacustomers as well as charges to members andclearing firms that utilize our varioustelecommunications networks and communicationsservices, including our co-location initiative, whichwas launched in January 2012. Access fee revenuevaries depending on the type of connection providedto customers. Revenue from communication fees isdependent on open outcry trading, as a portion relatesto telecommunications on our trading floors.Other revenues. To further diversify the range ofservices we offer, we have entered into processingand development agreements with other exchangesand service organizations. For example, we have anagreement with BM&FBOVESPA S.A(BM&FBOVESPA) to develop a new multi-assetclass electronic trading platform for their customers.We recognize revenue under this agreement asservices are provided and when developedtechnology is delivered.Additionally, other revenues include fees foradministrating our Interest Earning Facility (IEF)program, trade order routing, and various services tomembers and clearing firms. We offer clearing firmsthe opportunity to invest cash performance bonds inour various IEF offerings. These clearing firmsreceive interest income, and we receive a fee basedon total funds on deposit. In addition, other revenuesinclude trading gains and losses generated by GFXCorporation (GFX), our wholly-owned subsidiarythat trades futures contracts to enhance liquidity inour electronic markets for these products. Otherrevenues also include gains on sales from variousoperating assets.Other revenues also include rent charged to thirdparty tenants as well as ancillary charges for utilities,parking and miscellaneous services provided totenants.ExpensesThe majority of our expenses do not vary directlywith changes in our contract volume. Licensing andother fee agreements and the majority of ouremployee bonuses do vary directly with contractvolume.40
  • 51. Compensation and benefits. Compensation andbenefits expense is our most significant expense andincludes employee wages, bonuses, stock-basedcompensation, benefits and employer taxes. Changes inthis expense are driven by fluctuations in the number ofemployees, increases in wages as a result of inflation orlabor market conditions, changes in rates for employertaxes and other cost increases affecting benefit plans. Inaddition, this expense is affected by the composition ofour work force. The expense associated with our bonusand stock-based compensation plans can also have asignificant impact on this expense category and mayvary from year to year.The bonus component of our compensation andbenefits expense is based on our financialperformance. Under the performance criteria of ourannual incentive plans, the bonus funded under theplans is based on achieving certain financialperformance targets established by the compensationcommittee of our board of directors. Thecompensation committee may adjust the target levelof performance for material, unplanned operatingresults or capital expenditures to meet intermediate tolong-term growth opportunities.Stock-based compensation is a non-cash expenserelated to stock options, restricted stock andperformance share grants. Stock-based compensationvaries depending on the quantity and fair value ofawards granted. The fair value of options is derivedusing the Black-Scholes model with assumptionsabout our dividend yield, the expected volatility ofour stock price based on an analysis of implied andhistorical volatility, the risk-free interest rate and theexpected life of the options granted. The fair value ofother awards is based on either the share price on thedate of the grant or a model of expected future stockprices.Professional fees and outside services. Thisexpense includes fees for consulting servicesreceived on strategic and technology initiatives,temporary labor as well as legal and accounting fees.This expense may fluctuate as a result of changes inservices required to complete initiatives and legalproceedings.Amortization of purchased intangibles. Thisexpense includes amortization of intangible assetsobtained in our mergers with CBOT Holdings, Inc.and NYMEX Holdings, Inc. as well as other assetand business acquisitions. Intangible assets subject toamortization consist primarily of clearing firm,market data and other customer relationships.Depreciation and amortization. Depreciation andamortization expense results from the depreciation oflong-lived assets such as buildings, leaseholdimprovements, furniture, fixtures and equipment.This expense also includes the amortization ofpurchased and internally developed software.Other expenses. We incur additional ongoingexpenses for communications, technology supportservices and various other activities necessary tosupport our operations.• Communications expense includes costs fornetwork connections for our electronicplatforms and some market data customers;telecommunications costs of our exchange;and fees paid for access to external marketdata. This expense may be impacted bygrowth in electronic contract volume, ourcapacity requirements and changes in thenumber of telecommunications hubs andconnections which allow customers outsidethe United States to access our electronicplatforms directly.• Technology support services consist of costsrelated to maintenance of the hardware andsoftware required to support our technology.Our technology support services costs aredriven by system capacity, functionality andredundancy requirements.• Occupancy and building operations expenseconsists of costs related to leased and ownedproperty including rent, maintenance, realestate taxes, utilities and other related costs.We have significant operations located inChicago and New York City with smalleroffices located throughout the world.Additionally, we have trading facilities inChicago, New York City and Kansas City aswell as data centers in various U.S. locations.• Licensing and other fee agreements expenseincludes license fees paid as a result ofcontract volume in equity index products, androyalty and broker rebates on energy andmetals products. This expense fluctuates withchanges in contract volumes as well aschanges in fee structures.41
  • 52. • Other expenses include marketing and travel-related expenses as well as general andadministrative costs. Marketing, advertisingand public relations expense includes media,print and other advertising costs, as well ascosts associated with our product promotion.Other expenses also include litigation andcustomer settlements, impairment charges onoperational assets and foreign currencytransaction gains and losses resulting fromchanges in exchange rates on certain foreigndeposits.Non-Operating Income and ExpensesIncome and expenses incurred through activitiesoutside of our core operations are considered non-operating. These activities include non-core investingand financing activities.• Investment income includes dividend incomefrom our strategic equity investments; gainsand losses on trading securities in our non-qualified deferred compensation plans; short-term investment of excess cash, clearingfirms’ cash performance bonds and guarantyfund contributions; and interest income andrealized gains and losses from our marketablesecurities. Investment income is influenced bythe amount of dividends distributed by ourstrategic investments, the availability of fundsgenerated by operations; market interest rates,and changes in the levels of cash performancebonds deposited by clearing firms.• We use derivative financial instruments forthe purpose of hedging exposures tofluctuations in interest rates. Any ineffectiveor excluded portion of our hedges isrecognized in earnings immediately.• Interest and other borrowing costs areassociated with various short-term and long-term funding facilities. We also maintain acommercial paper program with variousfinancial institutions.• Equity in net gains (losses) of unconsolidatedsubsidiaries includes income and losses fromour investments in S&P/Dow Jones IndicesLLC, Dubai Mercantile Exchange and BursaMalaysia Derivatives Berhad.• Other income (expense) includes the net gainrelated to the contribution of the DJI assetgroup and the sale of CMA as well as gainsrelated to our former securities lendingprogram.CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIESThe notes to our consolidated financial statementsinclude disclosure of our significant accountingpolicies. In establishing these policies within theframework of accounting principles generallyaccepted in the United States, management mustmake certain assessments, estimates and choices thatwill result in the application of these principles in amanner that appropriately reflects our financialcondition and results of operations. Criticalaccounting policies are those policies that we believepresent the most complex or subjectivemeasurements and have the most potential to affectour financial position and operating results. While alldecisions regarding accounting policies areimportant, there are certain accounting policies thatwe consider to be critical. These critical policies,which are presented in detail in the notes to ourconsolidated financial statements, relate to thevaluation of financial instruments, goodwill andintangible assets, revenue recognition, income taxes,and internal use software costs.Valuation of financial instruments. Fair value isdefined as the price that would be received to sell anasset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderlytransaction between market participants at themeasurement date, or an exit price. We havecategorized financial instruments measured at fairvalue into the following three-level fair valuehierarchy based upon the level of judgmentassociated with the inputs used to measure the fairvalue:• Level 1—Inputs are unadjusted, quoted pricesin active markets for identical assets orliabilities at the measurement date. Assets andliabilities carried at level 1 fair valuegenerally include U.S. Treasury securities,equity securities listed in active markets, andinvestments in publicly traded mutual fundswith quoted market prices.• Level 2—Inputs are either directly orindirectly observable and corroborated bymarket data or are based on quoted prices in42
  • 53. markets that are not active. Assets andliabilities carried at level 2 fair valuegenerally include municipal bonds, asset-backed securities, U.S. government agencysecurities and certain derivatives.• Level 3—Inputs are unobservable and reflectmanagement’s best estimate of what marketparticipants would use in pricing the asset orliability. Generally assets and liabilities at fairvalue utilizing level 3 inputs include certainother assets and liabilities with inputs thatrequire management’s judgment.For further discussion regarding the fair value offinancial assets and liabilities, see note 19 in thenotes to the consolidated financial statements.Goodwill and intangible assets. We reviewgoodwill for impairment on an annual basis andwhenever events or circumstances indicate that itscarrying value may not be recoverable. Goodwillmay be tested quantitatively for impairment bycomparing the carrying value of a reporting unit to itsestimated fair value. Estimating the fair value of areporting unit involves the use of valuationtechniques that rely on significant estimates andassumptions. These estimates and assumptions mayinclude forecasted revenue growth rates; forecastedoperating margins; risk-adjusted discount rates;forecasted economic and market conditions, andindustry multiples. We base our fair value estimateson assumptions we believe to be reasonable given theinformation that is available to us at the time of ourassessment; however, actual future results may differsignificantly from those estimates. Under certainfavorable circumstances, goodwill may be reviewedqualitatively for indications of impairment withoututilizing valuation techniques to estimate fair value.The qualitative assessment of goodwill relies onsignificant assumptions about forecasts of revenuegrowth, operating margins and economic conditionsas well as overall market and industry-specific trends.We also review indefinite-lived intangible assets onan annual basis or more frequently when events andcircumstances indicate that their carrying value maynot be recoverable. Indefinite-lived intangible assetsmay be tested quantitatively for impairment bycomparing their carrying values to their estimatedfair values. Estimating the fair value of indefinite-lived intangible assets involves the use of valuationtechniques that rely on significant estimates andassumptions. These estimates and assumptions mayinclude forecasted revenue growth rates; forecastedallocations of expense, and risk-adjusted discountrates. We base our fair value estimates onassumptions we believe to be reasonable given theinformation that is available to us at the time of ourassessment; however, actual future results may differsignificantly from those estimates. Similar togoodwill, under certain favorable circumstances,indefinite-lived intangible assets may be reviewedqualitatively for indications of impairment withoututilizing valuation techniques to estimate fair value.The qualitative assessment of indefinite-livedintangibles assets relies on significant assumptionsabout forecasts of revenue growth, operating marginsand economic conditions as well as overall marketand industry-specific trends.Intangible assets subject to amortization are alsoassessed for impairment when indicated by a changein economic or operational circumstances. Theimpairment assessment of these assets requiresmanagement to first compare the book value of theamortizing asset to undiscounted cash flows. If thebook value exceeds the undiscounted cash flows,management is then required to estimate the fairvalue of the assets and record an impairment loss forthe excess of the carrying value over the fair value.Revenue recognition. A significant portion of ourrevenue is derived from the clearing and transactionfees we assess on each contract executed through ourtrading venues and cleared through our clearinghouses. Clearing and transaction fees are recognized asrevenue when a buy and sell order are matched andwhen the trade is cleared. On occasion, the customer’sexchange trading privileges may not be properlyentered by the clearing firm and incorrect fees arecharged for the transactions in the affected accounts.When this information is corrected within the timeperiod allowed by the exchange, a fee adjustment isprovided to the clearing firm. An accrual is establishedfor estimated fee adjustments to reflect corrections tocustomer exchange trading privileges. The accrual isbased on the historical pattern of adjustmentsprocessed as well as specific adjustment requests.Income taxes. Calculation of the income taxprovision includes an estimate of the income taxesthat will be paid for the current year as well as anestimate of income tax liabilities or benefits deferred43
  • 54. into future years. Deferred tax assets are reviewed todetermine if they will be realized in future periods.To the extent it is determined that some deferred taxassets may not be fully realized, the assets arereduced to their realizable value by a valuationallowance. The calculation of our tax provisioninvolves uncertainty in the application of complextax regulations. We recognize potential liabilities foranticipated tax audit issues in the United States andother applicable foreign tax jurisdictions using amore-likely-than-not recognition threshold based onthe technical merits of the tax position taken orexpected to be taken. If payment of these amountsvaries from our estimate, our income tax provisionwould be reduced or increased at the time thatdetermination is made. This determination may notbe known for several years. Past tax audits have notresulted in tax adjustments that would result in amaterial change to the income tax provision in theyear the audit was completed. The effective tax rate,defined as the income tax provision as a percentageof income before income taxes, will vary from yearto year based on changes in tax jurisdictions, tax ratesand regulations. In addition, the effective tax rate willvary with changes to income that are not subject toincome tax, such as municipal interest income, andchanges in expenses or losses that are not deductible,such as the utilization of foreign net operating losses.Internal use software costs. Certain internal andexternal costs that are incurred in connection withdeveloping or obtaining computer software forinternal use are capitalized. Software developmentcosts incurred during the planning or maintenanceproject stages are expensed as incurred, while costsincurred during the application development stage arecapitalized and are amortized over the estimateduseful life of the software, generally three years.Amortization of capitalized costs begins only whenthe software becomes ready for its intended use.RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTSIn December 2011 and January 2013, the FinancialAccounting Standards Board issued updates toexisting rules over balance sheet offsettingdisclosure. The updates require entities to discloseboth gross and net information about certain financialinstruments eligible for offset in the balance sheet.Financial instruments may include derivatives,repurchase agreements and securities lendingtransactions. The objective of these disclosures is tofacilitate comparison between those entities thatprepare their financial statements in accordance withU.S. generally accepted accounting principles andthose entities that prepare their financial statementsusing International Financial Reporting Standards.The updates are effective for annual reporting periodsbeginning on or after January 1, 2013, and interimperiods therein, with retrospective applicationrequired for comparability purposes.RESULTS OF OPERATIONS2012 Financial HighlightsThe comparability of our operating results for the periods presented may be impacted by mergers, acquisitions anddisposals of businesses and/or asset groups. Where material, these impacts are discussed in the analysis that follows.The following summarizes significant changes in our financial performance for the years presented.Year-over-Year Change(dollars in millions, except per share data) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Total revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,914.6 $3,280.6 $3,003.7 (11)% 9%Total expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,222.6 1,259.5 1,172.6 (3) 7Operating margin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58% 62% 61%Non-operating income (expense) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1.4 $ (84.6) $ (109.2) (102) (22)Effective tax rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46% 6% 45%Net income attributable to CME Group . . . . . . . . . . . $ 896.3 $1,812.3 $ 951.4 (51) 90Diluted earnings per common share attributable toCME Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.70 5.43 2.86 (50) 90Cash flows from operating activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,216.8 1,346.3 1,359.6 (10) (1)44
  • 55. • In 2012 when compared with 2011, thedecrease in total revenues was attributable tolower contract volume and a decrease inmarket data and information services revenueas a result of the contribution of the DJI assetgroup. Higher contract volume as well asmarket data and information services revenuecontributed to an increase in revenues in 2011when compared with 2010.• In 2011, we recognized expenses related tothe MF Global bankruptcy, resulting in adecrease in expenses in 2012 when comparedwith 2011 and an increase in 2011 whencompared with 2010. Higher compensationand benefits expense partially offset thedecrease in operating expenses in 2012 whencompared with 2011 and contributed to anincrease in expenses in 2011 when comparedwith 2010. In 2010, we also recognizedimpairment charges on the goodwill and tradename related to our CMA operations.• Non-operating income increased from 2011 to2012 primarily as a result of the net gain fromthe contribution of the DJI asset group toS&P/DJI and the sale of CMA. In addition,we began recognizing our proportionate shareof net income from our venture with McGrawin July 2012. The decrease in non-operatingexpense in 2011 compared with 2010 wasattributable to lower interest expense resultingfrom the repayment of the $420.5 millionterm loan in January 2011 and the maturity ofthe $300.0 million floating rate notes inAugust 2010.• In 2011, we reduced our income tax provisiondue to a revaluation of our deferred taxliabilities resulting from a change in state taxapportionment. This revaluation contributedto an increase in the effective tax rate in 2012when compared with 2011 and a decrease inthe effective tax rate in 2011 when comparedwith 2010. The increase in the effective taxrate in 2012 when compared with 2011 wasalso due to the establishment of deferred taxliabilities associated with S&P/DJI.RevenuesYear-over-Year Change(dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Clearing and transaction fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,371.5 $2,710.9 $2,486.3 (13)% 9%Market data and information services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387.1 427.7 395.1 (9) 8Access and communication fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88.8 49.2 45.4 80 8Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67.2 92.8 76.9 (28) 21Total Revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,914.6 $3,280.6 $3,003.7 (11) 9Clearing and Transaction FeesThe following table summarizes our total contract volume, revenue and average rate per contract. Total contractvolume includes contracts that are traded on our exchange and cleared through our clearing houses. Contractvolume also includes certain cleared-only contracts. Volume is measured in round turns, which is considered acompleted transaction that involves a purchase and an offsetting sale of a contract. Average rate per contract isdetermined by dividing total clearing and transaction fees by total contract volume. All amounts exclude ourcredit default swap, interest rate swap, TRAKRS and CME Clearing Europe contracts. The following table alsoexcludes volume from KCBT from December 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012.Year-over-Year Change2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Total contract volume (in millions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,890.0 3,386.7 3,078.1 (15)% 10%Clearing and transaction fees (in millions) . . . . . . . . . . $2,365.6 $2,710.8 $2,486.2 (13) 9Average rate per contract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.819 0.800 0.808 2 (1)45
  • 56. We estimate the following increases (decreases) inclearing and transaction fees based on change in totalcontract volume and change in average rate percontract during 2012 compared with 2011, andduring 2011 compared with 2010.Year-over-Year Change(in millions) 2012-2011 2011-2010Increase (decrease) due tochange in total contractvolume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $(406.6) $247.0Increase (decrease) due tochange in average rate percontract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61.4 (22.4)Net increase (decrease) inclearing and transactionfees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $(345.2) $224.6Average rate per contract is impacted by our ratestructure, including volume-based incentives; productmix; trading venue, and the percentage of volumeexecuted by customers who are members comparedwith non-member customers. Due to the relationshipbetween average rate per contract and contractvolume, the change in clearing and transaction feesattributable to changes in each is only anapproximation.Contract VolumeThe following table summarizes average daily contract volume. Contract volume can be influenced by manyfactors, including political and economic factors, the regulatory environment and market competition.Year-over-Year Change(amounts in thousands) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Average Daily Volume by Product Line:Interest rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,834 6,030 5,449 (20)% 11%Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,560 3,238 2,907 (21) 11Foreign exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845 922 919 (8) —Agricultural commodity(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,140 1,087 914 5 19Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,692 1,775 1,662 (5) 7Metal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 387 316 (9) 23Aggregate average daily volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,423 13,439 12,167 (15) 10Average Daily Volume by Venue:Electronic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,739 11,350 10,120 (14) 12Open outcry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,045 1,398 1,402 (25) —Privately negotiated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 231 198 (5) 17Total exchange-traded volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,005 12,979 11,720 (15) 11Total CME ClearPort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 460 447 (9) 3Aggregate average daily volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,423 13,439 12,167 (15) 10(1) The agricultural commodity product line does not include the agricultural commodity contract volume forKCBT. The average daily volume for KCBT’s agricultural commodity contracts was 16,100 duringDecember 2012.46
  • 57. Interest Rate ProductsThe following table summarizes average daily volume for our key interest rate products. Eurodollar front 8contracts include contracts expiring within two years. Eurodollar back 32 contracts include contracts expiringwithin three to ten years.Year-over-Year Change(amounts in thousands) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Eurodollar futures and options:Front 8 futures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,099 1,717 1,646 (36)% 4%Back 32 futures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579 510 357 13 43Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410 767 726 (47) 6U.S. Treasury futures and options:10-Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,255 1,454 1,380 (14) 55-Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567 720 546 (21) 32Treasury bond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427 415 388 3 72-Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 297 274 (22) 8Overall interest rate contract volume decreased in2012 when compared with 2011 due to low interestrate volatility as a result of the Federal Reserve’scontinued intent to maintain its zero interest ratepolicy through mid-2015. In 2012 when comparedwith 2011, the increase in volume in the long-terminterest rate products, including the Eurodollar back32 futures and the Treasury bond futures and optionscontracts was attributable to periods of higher long-term interest rate volatility in early 2012. The FederalReserve’s announcement in January 2012 to extendits zero interest rate policy shifted marketexpectations regarding long-term interest rates, whichresulted in periods of higher volatility in early 2012.In 2011 when compared with 2010, the overallincrease in interest rate contract volume wasattributable to volatility caused by a change in marketexpectations regarding short-term and long-terminterest rates tied to the Federal Reserve’sannouncement in 2011 that it intended to maintain itszero interest rate policy through 2013. In addition,volatility caused by the downgrade of the UnitedStates credit rating in August 2011 also contributedto an increase in overall volume. Mid-term interestrate contract volume, which includes Eurodollar back32 futures and 5-year U.S. Treasury futures andoptions, grew at a faster rate than short-term contractvolume because of a shift from contracts based onshort-term interest rates to mid-term interest rates dueto the continued zero interest rate policy.We also believe that overall U.S. Treasury futuresand options contract volume increased in 2011 whencompared with 2010 due to institutional portfolioadjustments caused by the downgrade of the UnitedStates credit rating. Many institutional portfolios arerequired to maintain an average minimum overallcredit rating. When the U.S. Treasury credit ratingwas downgraded, the institutional portfolios had tosell investments with lower credit ratings and buymore U.S. Treasuries in order to increase theiraverage minimum overall credit rating. In addition,the growth in overall U.S. Treasury futures andoptions contract volume was attributable to increaseddemand for U.S. Treasury securities as a safe haveninvestment during the European credit crisis.Equity ProductsThe following table summarizes average daily volume for our key equity products.Year-over-Year Change(amounts in thousands) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010E-mini S&P 500 futures and options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,016 2,605 2,285 (23)% 14%E-mini NASDAQ 100 futures and options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 301 317 (16) (5)47
  • 58. The decrease in equity contract volume in 2012 whencompared with 2011 was due to a decline in equitymarket volatility, as measured by the CBOE VolatilityIndex. The decline in volatility was the result of fewnew developments in the macroeconomicenvironment within the United States and Europeanmarkets. We believe a decline in assets undermanagement also contributed to a decrease in volumein 2012 when compared with 2011.In 2011 when compared with 2010, an overallincrease in volatility contributed to higher equitycontract volume. We believe the periods of highvolatility within the equity markets during the thirdquarter of 2011 were attributable to the downgrade ofthe United States credit rating and the continuation ofthe sovereign debt crisis in Europe. In general, equityproducts such as the E-mini NASDAQ contracts thathedge market risks different than those of the E-miniS&P 500, our most liquid equity product, do not tendto benefit from macro-level events or increasedvolatility to the same extent.Foreign Exchange ProductsThe following table summarizes average daily volume for our key foreign exchange products.Year-over-Year Change(amounts in thousands) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Euro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290 357 367 (19)% (3)%Australian dollar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 126 105 7 20British pound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 118 124 (10) (5)Japanese yen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 118 131 (16) (10)Canadian dollar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 92 91 1 1The overall decrease in foreign exchange contractvolume in 2012 when compared with 2011 wasattributable primarily to the decline in euro contractvolume. We believe trading activity in euro contractswas impacted by the lack of a directional trend due touncertainty related to the health of the EuropeanUnion and concern regarding additional economicstimulus provided by the Federal Reserve. The lackof a trend has reduced trading in euro contractsamong customers who trade based on medium- tolong-term expectations. We believe th uncertaintywith the European Union also contributed to adecline in British pound contract volume in 2012when compared with 2011 because the Britisheconomy is closely tied to the European Union. Webelieve that intervention by the Japanese central bankto control the yen foreign exchange rate beginning inmid-2011 through 2012 caused market participants toreduce their trading in Japanese yen contracts and tofocus on higher yielding currencies, such as theAustralian and Canadian dollars.In 2011 when compared with 2010, foreign exchangecontract volume remained at a consistent level. Webelieve that intervention by the Japanese central bankto control the yen foreign exchange rate anduncertainty about the Euro as a result of the Europeansovereign debt crisis caused the market to move tosafe haven currencies, such as the Australian dollarand the Canadian dollar. As a result, Euro andJapanese yen contract volume decreased whileAustralian dollar volume increased.Agricultural Commodity ProductsThe following table summarizes average daily volume for our key agricultural commodity products.Year-over-Year Change(amounts in thousands) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Corn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392 426 358 (8)% 19%Soybean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 232 186 20 25Wheat(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 115 109 12 5Soybean Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 105 89 12 18(1) Wheat contract volume does not include volume for KCBT’s hard red winter wheat products. The averagedaily volume for KCBT’s agricultural commodity contracts was 16,100 during December 2012.48
  • 59. The increase in agricultural commodity contractvolume in 2012 when compared with 2011 wasattributable to higher volatility resulting from severedrought conditions in the Midwest in the second andthird quarters of 2012. We believe the increasedvolatility was the result of supply constraint concernsfor soybean and wheat supplies. Corn volumesdeclined slightly in 2012 when compared with 2011.Early market expectations of excess supply in 2012dampened corn price volatility in early 2012, whichresulted in the decline in volume.We believe that the increase in contract volume in2011 when compared with 2010 was attributable to adecline in supply due to various weather eventsincluding flooding, drought and excessive heat. Thechange in supply resulted in increased volatility andhigher grain prices. We also believe that the increasein volume resulted from increased demand forfeedgrains caused by higher demand for cattle andother proteins in emerging markets.Energy ProductsThe following table summarizes average daily volume for our key energy products.Year-over-Year Change(amounts in thousands) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Crude oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 729 900 853 (19)% 5%Natural gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600 533 489 12 9Refined products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 275 244 14 13Energy contract volume decreased slightly in 2012when compared with 2011. A decline in crude oilcontract volume resulting from lower price volatilitycontributed to an overall decrease in energy productsvolume. Political unrest in the Middle East in the firstquarter of 2011 resulted in changes in global supply,which contributed to higher price volatility in early2011 relative to 2012. Additionally, lower crude oilcontract volume in 2012 was partially attributable tooversupply in Cushing, Oklahoma. We believe thatthe reversal of the Seaway Pipeline in the secondquarter of 2012, and ongoing capacity increases inthe pipeline, will continue to relieve oversupply andprovide needed infrastructure for ongoing expectedNorth American crude oil supply increases. However,uncertainty remains over the timing and extent of theimpact the reversal will have on the overall crude oilmarket. The decrease in crude oil contract volumewas partially offset by an increase in natural gascontract volume. The increase in natural gas contractvolume resulted largely from volatility aroundproduction shifts in the early part of 2012. Refinedproducts growth is due to increased volatility causedby a growing US export market as global oil marketsadapt to increased supply of North American crudeoil, despite refinery shutdowns.In 2011 when compared with 2010, we believe theincrease in energy contract volume was attributableto increased price volatility within the energy marketduring the first quarter of 2011. We also believe thatincreased volatility caused by weather-related eventsled to an increase in natural gas contract volume in2011.Metal ProductsThe following table summarizes average daily volume for our key metal products.Year-over-Year Change(amounts in thousands) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Gold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 238 208 (11)% 14%Copper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 50 41 29 22Silver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 87 57 (31) 5149
  • 60. The overall decrease in metal products volume in2012 when compared with 2011 was due to lowervolatility in the precious metals markets in 2012when compared with 2011. We believe the August2011 announcement of the Federal Reserve’s intentto maintain its zero interest rate policy and deepeningEurozone worries, which caused high volatilitywithin other financial markets in 2011, resulted in anincreased interest in precious metals as an asset class.This increased interest in 2011 resulted in relativedecreases in gold and silver contract volume in 2012when compared with 2011. This decrease waspartially offset by an increase in volume for coppercontracts as a result of economic growth in Asia aswell as global supply constraints.The overall increase in metal contract volume in2011 when compared with 2010 was attributable tothe increased investment in precious metals as anasset class due to high volatility and uncertaintywithin the financial markets. We believe that therewas an increase in silver contract volume due to thegreater use of silver as an alternative investment.Average Rate per ContractThe average rate per contract increased in 2012 whencompared with 2011 due to a shift in the relative mixof product volume. In 2012, agricultural commodityand energy product volumes, when measured as apercentage of total volume, each increased by 2%while interest rate and equity product volumesdecreased by 3% and 2%, respectively. Agriculturalcommodity and energy products have higher feescompared with interest rate products and equityproducts.In 2011 when compared with 2010, the average rateper contract decreased due to an increase in membercontract volume, which increased faster than non-member trading. In general, members receive lowerrates when compared with non-members.Concentration of RevenueWe bill a substantial portion of our clearing andtransaction fees to our clearing firms. The majority ofclearing and transaction fees received from clearingfirms represent charges for trades executed andcleared on behalf of their customers. Two firms eachrepresented 12% of our clearing and transaction feesrevenue in 2012. One firm represented 12% of ourclearing and transaction fees revenue in 2011. Onefirm represented 13% and one firm represented 12%of our clearing and transaction fees revenue in 2010.Should a clearing firm withdraw, we believe that thecustomer portion of the firm’s trading activity wouldlikely transfer to another clearing firm of theexchange. Therefore, we do not believe we areexposed to significant risk from an ongoing loss ofrevenue received from or through a particularclearing firm.Other Sources of RevenueMarket data and information services. The decline inmarket data and information services revenue in 2012when compared with 2011 resulted from a $53.2million decrease in market data and informationservices revenue from Index Services and CMA. Inthe second quarter of 2012, the DJI asset group,including assets which generated market data andinformation services revenue, was contributed to theMcGraw venture and CMA was sold to McGraw. Inaddition, the decrease in revenue was due to a declinein the basic device count in 2012 due to cost-cuttinginitiatives at customer firms. The decrease in marketdata and information services was partially offset byan increase in our basic device service fee from $61per month to $70 per month effective January 2012.Revenues from Index Services contributed to anincrease in market data and information servicesrevenue in 2011 when compared with 2010. In March2010, we formed Index Services, which generatedadditional revenues of $35.6 million in 2011 whencompared with 2010. In addition, revenues fromIndex Services increased in 2011 when comparedwith 2010 due to growth in assets undermanagement, which was driven by underlying indexmarket performance. The overall increase in 2011when compared with 2010 was partially offset by adecline in revenue due to a decrease in basic devicecounts resulting from cost-cutting initiatives atcustomer firms.The two largest resellers of our market datarepresented, in aggregate, 43%, 39% and 45% of ourmarket data and information services revenue in2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Despite thisconcentration, we consider exposure to significantrisk of revenue loss to be minimal. In the event thatone of these vendors no longer subscribes to ourmarket data, we believe the majority of that vendor’s50
  • 61. customers would likely subscribe to our market datathrough another reseller. Additionally, several of ourlargest institutional customers that utilize servicesfrom our two largest resellers report usage and remitpayment of their fees directly to us.Access and communication fees. Our co-locationprogram contributed to an increase in access andcommunication fees revenue from 2010 through2012. During the fourth quarter of 2011, wesubstantially completed installations of equipment forcustomers and launched our co-location services onJanuary 29, 2012. We generated incremental revenueof $47.8 million in 2012 when compared with 2011and incremental revenue of $3.4 million in 2011when compared with 2010.Other revenue. In 2012 when compared with 2011,the decrease in other revenue was largely due to adecline in rental income of $13.1 million resultingfrom the sale of the CBOT buildings in Chicago. Inthe second quarter of 2011, we recognized a $9.8million gain on the sale of certain Index Servicesassets related to one of its service offerings, whichcontributed to a decrease in other revenues in 2012when compared with 2011. The initial phase todevelop a new multi-asset class electronic platformfor BM&FBOVESPA was completed in the thirdquarter of 2011, which also resulted in a decrease inother revenues in 2012. The decrease in otherrevenues in 2012 when compared with 2011 waspartially offset by additional processing servicesrevenue from various strategic relationships.In 2011 when compared with 2010, the increase inother revenues was largely attributable to the $9.8million gain on the sale of certain Index Servicesassets and additional processing services revenue.The increase was partially offset by a decrease inrevenues resulting from our platform developmentfor BM&FBOVESPA.ExpensesYear-over-Year Change(dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Compensation and benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 496.7 $ 475.7 $ 432.1 4% 10%Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.1 42.3 40.6 (5) 4Technology support services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.7 52.1 50.5 (3) 3Professional fees and outside services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126.8 126.1 117.5 1 7Amortization of purchased intangibles . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116.2 132.0 128.1 (12) 3Depreciation and amortization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136.9 128.5 129.9 6 (1)Occupancy and building operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77.0 77.5 74.9 (1) 3Licensing and other fee agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82.6 84.9 82.6 (3) 3Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95.6 140.4 116.4 (32) 21Total Expenses $1,222.6 $1,259.5 $1,172.6 (3) 751
  • 62. 2012 Compared With 2011Operating expenses decreased by $36.9 million in2012 when compared with 2011. The following tableshows the estimated impact of key factors resulting inthe decrease in operating expenses.(dollars in millions)Year-Over-YearChangeChange as aPercentage of2011 ExpensesSalaries, benefits andemployer taxes . . . . . . . $ 15.0 1%Stock-basedcompensation . . . . . . . . 10.1 1Non-qualified deferredcompensation . . . . . . . . 5.7 —Bonus expense . . . . . . . . . (15.2) (1)Amortization of purchasedintangibles . . . . . . . . . . . (15.9) (1)MF Global-relatedexpense . . . . . . . . . . . . . (27.6) (3)Other expenses, net . . . . . . (9.0) —Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $(36.9) (3)%In 2012 when compared with 2011, an increase insalaries, benefits and employer taxes resulted fromhigher salaries and rising healthcare costs. Theincrease was partially offset by a decrease in averageheadcount as a result of the contribution of the DJIasset group to the McGraw venture and the sale ofCMA in the second quarter of 2012.The increase in stock-based compensation expensewas due to the accelerated vesting of stock-basedcompensation associated with our CEO transition in2012 as well as the impact related to the September2011 and 2012 grants.An increase in our non-qualified deferredcompensation liability, the impact of which does notaffect net income because of an equal and offsettingchange in investment income, contributed to anincrease in compensation and benefits expense.Bonus expense decreased due to performance relativeto our 2012 cash earnings target when compared with2011 performance relative to our 2011 cash earningstarget.Amortization of purchased intangibles declined as aresult of the contribution of the DJI asset group, thesale of CMA and the disposal of certain lease-relatedintangible assets in the second quarter of 2012.Overall expenses also decreased in 2012 whencompared with 2011 due to the expenses incurred in2011 as a result of the MF Global bankruptcy filingin the fourth quarter of 2011, which included write-offs of accounts receivable, legal fees and losses oncollateral posted by GFX and held by MF Global incustomer segregated funds as well as other relatedexpenses. In 2012, we recognized a recovery on thelosses incurred on collateral posted by GFX in 2011.2011 Compared With 2010Operating expenses increased by $86.9 million in2011 when compared with 2010. The following tableshows the estimated impact of key factors resulting inthe increase in operating expenses.(dollars in millions)Year-Over-YearChangeChange as aPercentage of2010 ExpensesSalaries, benefits andemployer taxes . . . . . . . $ 44.2 4%MF Global-relatedexpense . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29.1 2Stock-basedcompensation . . . . . . . . 10.5 1Marketing expense . . . . . . 7.0 1Professional fees related toIndex Services . . . . . . . . (10.7) (1)CMA goodwill and tradename impairment . . . . . (20.5) (2)Other expenses, net . . . . . . 27.3 2Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 86.9 7%Salary increases and rising healthcare costscontributed to a rise in salaries, benefits andemployer taxes. An increase in average headcountprimarily due to the formation of Index Services andinvestment in strategic growth initiatives alsocontributed to an increase in expense in 2011 whencompared with 2010.Expenses increased due to the MF Global bankruptcyfiling in the fourth quarter of 2011.Stock-based compensation increased in 2011 due tothe expense impact related to the September 2010and 2011 grants.Marketing expenses increased in 2011 due primarilyto new advertising initiatives.52
  • 63. A decrease in professional fees in 2011 wasattributable to the formation and integration of IndexServices, which occurred in the first quarter of 2010.Impairment charges recorded in the second quarter of2010 on the goodwill and trade name related to ourCMA operations also contributed to a decrease inexpenses in 2011 when compared with 2010.Non-Operating Income (Expense)Year-over-Year Change(dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Investment income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 38.7 $ 36.7 $ 42.3 5% (13)%Impairment of long-term investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — — (2.2) — (100)Gains (losses) on derivative investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (0.1) (0.1) (2.6) — (96)Interest and other borrowing costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (132.2) (116.9) (140.3) 13 (17)Equity in net gains (losses) of unconsolidatedsubsidiaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.7 (4.3) (6.4) n.m. (33)Other income (expense) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64.3 — — n.m. —Total Non-Operating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1.4 $ (84.6) $(109.2) (102) (22)n.m. not meaningfulInvestment income. The increase in investmentincome during 2012 when compared with the sameperiod in 2011 was attributable to an increase ingains on marketable securities related to our non-qualified deferred compensation plan of $5.7 million.Gains and losses from these non-qualified deferredcompensation plan securities are offset by an equalamount of compensation and benefits expense. Theincrease in investment income was also attributableto other gains on investments. The increase ininvestment income was partially offset by a decreasein dividend income of $5.9 million in 2012 comparedwith the same period in 2011 due largely to adecrease in dividends from our investment inBM&FBOVESPA in 2012 when compared with2011.The decrease in investment income during 2011when compared with 2010 was due to a decline ingains on marketable securities related to our non-qualified deferred compensation plans of $4.1million. In addition, we recognized a gain of $3.7million from the sale of various equity and debtsecurities in 2010, which contributed to the decreasein investment income in 2011 when compared with2010. The decrease in 2011 when compared with2010 was partially offset by an increase in dividendincome from our investment in BM&FBOVESPA.Total overall dividend income was $34.9 million in2011 compared with $31.9 million in 2010.Gains (losses) on derivative investments. In 2010, werecognized an $8.6 million loss due to ineffectivenesson the interest rate swap contract used to hedgeinterest rate risk on our term loan. Both the swapcontract and the term loan were originally scheduledto expire in August 2011. In December 2010, weapproved a plan to refinance the term loan in January2011 resulting in ineffectiveness of the hedge.Additionally, in March 2010, we recognized a $6.0million gain on derivative investments as a result of asettlement from the Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.(Lehman) bankruptcy proceedings. The settlementrelated to an unsecured claim against Lehman ascounterparty to an over-the-counter put optioncontract we purchased to hedge our risk of changes inthe fair value of BM&FBOVESPA stock resultingfrom foreign currency exchange rate fluctuationsbetween the U.S. dollar and the Brazilian real.53
  • 64. Interest and other borrowing costs. The following table shows the weighted average borrowings outstanding,weighted average effective yield and average cost of borrowing for the periods presented:Year-over-Year Change(dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Weighted average borrowings outstanding . . . . . . . . . . $2,344.1 $2,155.8 $2,668.1 $188.3 $(512.3)Weighted average effective yield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.06% 5.18% 4.96% (0.12)% 0.22%Average cost of borrowing(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.66 5.47 5.24 0.19 0.23(1) Average cost of borrowing includes interest, the effective portion of interest rate hedges, commitment fees,discount accretion and debt issuance costs.On September 10, 2012, we issued $750.0 million of3.0% fixed rate notes due September 2022, whichcontributed to the increase in the weighted averageborrowings outstanding and decreases in weightedaverage effective yield. The average cost ofborrowings increased in 2012 when compared with2011 because of higher commitment fees on the 364-day fully secured, committed line of credit resultingfrom an increase in the commitment.Interest expense decreased in 2011 compared with2010 due to repayment of the $420.5 million termloan in January 2011 and the maturity of the $300.0million floating rate notes in August 2010. Thedecrease in 2011 compared with 2010 was partiallyoffset by the issuance, in March 2010, of $612.5million of 4.40% fixed rate notes, which are due in2018. As a result, there was a decrease in weightedaverage borrowings and an increase in weightedaverage effective yield and average cost ofborrowings in 2011 when compared with 2010.Equity in net gains (losses) of unconsolidatedsubsidiaries. In 2012, we recognized income fromour investment in the McGraw venture, whichcontributed to increases in equity in net gains (losses)of unconsolidated subsidiaries in 2012 whencompared with 2011.Other income (expense). In 2012, we recognized anet gain of $58.9 million related to the contributionof the DJI asset group and the sale of CMA.Additionally, in 2012, we recognized a gain of $5.7million related to the recovery of a 2008 impairmentloss on a corporate debt security held in the NYMEXsecurities lending portfolio.Income Tax ProvisionThe following table summarizes the effective tax rate for the periods presented:Year-over-Year Change2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Year ended December 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46.5% 6.3% 44.7% 40.2% (38.4)%In 2011, we reduced our income tax provision by$646.0 million due largely to a revaluation of ourexisting deferred tax liabilities resulting from achange in state tax apportionment. This revaluationcontributed to an increase in the effective tax rate in2012 when compared with 2011 and a decrease in theeffective tax rate in 2011 when compared with 2010.In 2012, we established deferred income taxliabilities associated with the McGraw ventureresulting in a $106.8 million increase in our incometax provision, which also contributed to a highereffective tax rate in 2012 when compared with 2011.Additionally, in the first quarter of 2011, we beganmarking to market our investment inBM&FBOVESPA which resulted in a $48.8 millionreduction in valuation allowances on unrealizedcapital losses previously reserved, which alsoreduced our effective tax rate in 2011.54
  • 65. LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCESCash RequirementsWe have historically met our funding requirementswith cash generated by our ongoing operations.While our cost structure is fixed in the short term, oursources of operating cash are dependent on contractvolume levels. We believe that our existing cash,cash equivalents, marketable securities and cashgenerated from operations will be sufficient to coverour working capital needs, capital expenditures, andother commitments. However, it is possible that wemay need to raise additional funds to finance ouractivities through issuances of commercial paper,future public debt offerings or by direct borrowingsfrom financial institutions.Cash will also be required for operating leases and non-cancellable purchase obligations as well as otherobligations reflected as long-term liabilities in our consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2012. These wereas follows:(in millions)OperatingLeasesPurchaseObligationsOtherLong-TermLiabilities Total(1)Year2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 28.7 $16.6 $46.4 $ 91.72014-2015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58.0 17.7 — 75.72016-2017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58.2 1.5 — 59.7Thereafter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152.9 1.0 — 153.9Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $297.8 $36.8 $46.4 $381.0(1) Gross unrecognized income tax liabilities, including interest and penalties, of $57.8 million for uncertain taxpositions are not included in the table due to uncertainty about the date of their settlement.Operating leases include rent payments for officespace in Chicago and other smaller offices in theUnited States and in various foreign countries. Theoperating lease for our headquarters in Chicagoexpires in November 2022. Annual minimum rentalpayments under this lease range from $11.0 millionto $13.5 million. We also maintain operating leasesfor additional office spaces in Chicago, which expirein November 2023 and April 2027. Annual minimumrental payments under these leases range from $4.8million to $6.2 million and $2.9 million to $4.3million, respectively.Purchase obligations include minimum payments dueunder agreements to purchase software licenses,hardware and maintenance as well astelecommunication services. Other long-termliabilities include funding obligations for other post-retirement benefit plans as well as contingentconsideration.Future capital expenditures for technology areanticipated as we continue to support our growththrough additional investment in our co-locationprogram, increased system capacity and performanceimprovements. Each year, capital expenditures areincurred for improvements to and expansion of ouroffices, remote data centers, telecommunicationsnetwork and other operating equipment. In 2013, weexpect capital expenditures to total between $140.0million and $150.0 million. We continue to monitorour capital needs and may revise our forecastedexpenditures as necessary in the future.We intend to continue to pay a regular quarterlydividend to our shareholders. The decision to pay adividend, however, remains within the discretion ofour board of directors and may be affected by variousfactors, including our earnings, financial condition,capital requirements, levels of indebtedness and otherconsiderations our board of directors deems relevant.CME Group is also required to comply withrestrictions contained in the general corporation lawsof its state of incorporation, which could also limit itsability to declare and pay dividends. The distributiontarget under our annual dividend policy remains atapproximately 50% of the prior year’s cash earnings.On January 30, 2013, the board of directors declareda regular quarterly dividend of $0.45 per share. Thedividend will be payable on March 25, 2013 toshareholders of record on March 8, 2013. Assumingno changes in the number of shares outstanding, the55
  • 66. first quarter dividend payment will totalapproximately $149.3 million. The board of directorsalso declared an additional, annual variable dividendof $1.30 per share on December 5, 2012 paid onDecember 28, 2012 to the shareholders of record onDecember 17, 2012. This annual dividend willtypically be considered in the first quarter of eachyear and will supplement the regular dividend. Theannual variable dividend for 2013 was accelerated tothe fourth quarter of 2012 due to uncertaintysurrounding dividend income tax treatment beginningin 2013. In general, the amount of the annual variabledividend will be determined after the end of eachyear, and the level will increase or decrease fromyear to year based on operating results, potentialmerger and acquisition activity, and other forms ofcapital return including regular dividends and sharebuybacks during the prior year.Sources and Uses of CashThe following is a summary of cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities.Year-over-Year Change(dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 2012-2011 2011-2010Net cash provided by operating activities . . . . . . . . . . $1,216.8 $ 1,346.3 $1,359.6 (10)% (1)%Net cash used in investing activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (206.0) (153.6) (111.6) 35 38Net cash used in financing activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (448.4) (1,005.6) (653.4) (55) 54Operating activitiesIn 2012 when compared with 2011, net cash providedby operating activities decreased as a result of lowercontract volumes.Net cash provided by operating activities decreasedslightly in 2011 when compared with 2010. Increasedprofitability as a result of higher contract volumeswas offset by an increase in other current assets andother assets resulting from a reclassification of cashfrom cash and cash equivalents to other current assetsand other assets because the cash became subject torestrictions in conjunction with the contribution tothe CMECE guaranty fund.Investing activitiesCash used in investing activities in 2012 was higherthan cash used in 2011 due to the increasedinvestment in business ventures, partially offset bythe receipt of proceeds from the sale of the CBOTbuildings.The increase in cash used in investing activities in2011 when compared with 2010 was due to theproceeds from the sales of a long-term investmentand our exercise rights privileges in 2010.Financing activitiesCash used in financing activities was lower in 2012when compared with 2011. The decrease in cash usedwas attributable to the receipt of $747.7 million inproceeds from debt issued in September 2012 incontrast with repayments of $420.5 million of debt inthe first quarter of 2011. In addition, we repurchased$220.4 million of Class A common stock in 2011.The net decrease in cash used was partially offset bya $851.5 million increase in cash dividends paid in2012 when compared with 2011.The increase in cash used in 2011 compared with2010 was attributable to proceeds from our issuanceof shares to BM&FBOVESPA in 2010 and anincrease in cash dividends in 2011 when comparedwith 2010. The increase in cash used was partiallyoffset by a decrease in share repurchases of $354.9million in 2011 when compared with the same periodin 2010.Debt InstrumentsThe following table summarizes our debt outstandingas of December 31, 2012:(in millions) Par ValueFixed rate notes due August 2013, statedrate of 5.40% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750.0Fixed rate notes due February 2014, statedrate of 5.75% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 750.0Fixed rate notes due March 2018, statedrate of 4.40%(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 612.5Fixed rate notes due September 2022,stated rate of 3.00%(2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 750.0(1) In February 2010, we entered into a forward-starting interest rate swap agreement that56
  • 67. modified the interest obligation associated withthese notes so that the interest payable on thenotes effectively became fixed at a rate of 4.46%.(2) In August 2012, we entered into a forward-starting interest rate swap agreement thatmodified the interest obligation associated withthese notes so that the interest payable on thenotes effectively became fixed at a rate of3.32%.In November 2012, the multi-currency revolvingsenior credit facility with various financialinstitutions was increased from $1.0 billion to $1.8billion. The proceeds from the revolving senior creditfacility can be used for general corporate purposes,which includes providing liquidity for our CMEclearing house in certain circumstances and, ifnecessary, for maturities of commercial paper. Aslong as we are not in default under the new seniorcredit facility, we have the option to increase thefacility up to $2.3 billion with the consent of theagent and lenders providing the additional funds. InNovember 2012, the maturity date was extendedfrom January 2014 to January 2016 except for $95.0million of the existing commitments. The $1.8 billionmulti-currency revolving senior credit facilityincludes a provision to issue up to $250.0 million ofstand-by letters of credit. The senior credit facility isvoluntarily prepayable from time to time withoutpremium or penalty. Under our credit facility, we arerequired to remain in compliance with a consolidatednet worth test, which is defined as our consolidatedshareholders’ equity as of September 30, 2012,giving effect to share repurchases made and specialdividends paid during the term of the agreement (andin no event greater than $2.0 billion in aggregate),multiplied by 0.65. We currently do not have anyborrowings under this credit facility.We maintain a 364-day multi-currency line of creditwith a consortium of domestic and internationalbanks to be used in certain situations by our CMEclearing house. We may use the proceeds to providetemporary liquidity in the unlikely event of a clearingfirm default, in the event of a liquidity constraint ordefault by a depositary (custodian for our collateral),or in the event of a temporary disruption with thedomestic payments system that would delay paymentof settlement variation between us and our clearingfirms. CME clearing firm guaranty fundcontributions received in the form of U.S. Treasurysecurities, U.S. government agency securities ormoney market mutual funds as well as theperformance bond assets of a defaulting firm can beused to collateralize the facility. At December 31,2012, guaranty fund collateral available was $4.8billion. The line of credit provides for borrowings ofup to $5.0 billion. We have the option to request anincrease in the line from $5.0 billion to $7.0 billion,subject to the approval of participating banks. Inaddition to the 364-day multi-currency line of credit,we also have the option to use the $1.8 billion multi-currency revolving senior credit facility to provideliquidity for our clearing house in the unlikely eventof default in certain circumstances.In addition, our 364-day multi-currency line of creditcontains a requirement that CME remain incompliance with a consolidated tangible net worthtest, defined as CME consolidated shareholder’sequity less intangible assets (as defined in theagreement) of not less than $625.0 million. In theevent that CME elects to increase the facility, theminimum consolidated tangible net worth test wouldincrease ratably up to $875.0 million.The indentures governing our fixed rate notes, our$1.8 billion multi-currency revolving senior creditfacility and our 364-day multi-currency line of creditfor $5.0 billion do not contain specific covenants thatrestrict the ability to pay dividends. Thesedocuments, however, do contain other customaryfinancial and operating covenants that placerestrictions on the operations of the company thatcould indirectly affect the ability to pay dividends.At December 31, 2012, we have excess borrowingcapacity for general corporate purposes ofapproximately $1.8 billion under our multi-currencyrevolving senior credit facilities.At December 31, 2012, we were in compliance withthe various covenant requirements of all our debtfacilities.CME Group, as a holding company, has nooperations of its own. Instead, it relies on dividendsdeclared and paid to it by its subsidiaries in order toprovide a portion of the funds which it uses to paydividends to its shareholders.To satisfy our performance bond obligation withSingapore Exchange Limited, we may pledge CME-owned U.S. Treasury securities in lieu of, or in57
  • 68. combination with, irrevocable letters of credit. AtDecember 31, 2012, we had pledged letters of credittotaling $181.0 million.The following table summarizes our credit ratings asof December 31, 2012:Rating AgencyShort-TermDebt RatingLong-TermDebt Rating OutlookStandard &Poor’s . . . . . . A1+ AA- NegativeMoody’sInvestorsService . . . . . P1 Aa3 StableGiven our cash flow generation, our ability to paydown debt levels and our ability to refinance existingdebt facilities if necessary, we expect to maintain aninvestment grade rating. If our ratings aredowngraded below investment grade due to a changeof control, we are required to make an offer torepurchase our fixed rate notes at a price equal to101% of the principal amount, plus accrued andunpaid interest.Off-Balance Sheet ArrangementsAs of December 31, 2012, we did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined by theregulations of the Securities and ExchangeCommission.Liquidity and Cash ManagementCash and cash equivalents totaled $1.6 billion atDecember 31, 2012 and $1.0 billion at December 31,2011. The balance retained in cash and cashequivalents is a function of anticipated or possibleshort-term cash needs, prevailing interest rates, ourinvestment policy and alternative investment choices.A majority of our cash and cash equivalents balanceis invested in money market mutual funds that investonly in U.S. Treasury securities or U.S. governmentagency securities. Our exposure to credit andliquidity risk is minimal given the nature of theinvestments. Cash that is not available for generalcorporate purposes because of regulatoryrequirements or other restrictions is classified asrestricted cash and is included in other current assetsor other assets in the consolidated balance sheets.Our practice is to have our pension plan 100%funded at each year end on a projected benefitobligation basis, while also satisfying any minimumrequired contribution and obtaining the maximum taxdeduction. Based on our actuarial projections, weestimate that a $19.9 million contribution in 2013will allow us to meet our funding goal. However, theamount of the actual contribution is contingent on theactual rate of return on our plan assets during 2013and the December 31, 2013 discount rate.Regulatory RequirementsCME and KCBTCC are regulated by the CommodityFutures Trading Commission (CFTC) as U.S.Derivatives Clearing Organizations (DCO).Beginning in May 2012, DCOs are required tomaintain capital as defined by the CFTC in anamount at least equal to one year of projectedoperating expenses as well as cash, liquid securities,or a line of credit at least equal to six months ofprojected operating expenses. CME and KCBTCCare in compliance with the DCO financialrequirements.CME, CBOT, NYMEX, COMEX and KCBT areregulated by the CFTC as Designated ContractMarkets (DCM). Beginning in October 2012, DCMsare also required to maintain capital as defined by theCFTC in an amount at least equal to one year ofprojected operating expenses as well as cash, liquidsecurities, or a line of credit at least equal to sixmonths of projected operating expenses. Our DCMsare in compliance with the DCM financialrequirements.58
  • 69. ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE ANDQUALITATIVE DISCLOSURESABOUT MARKET RISKWe are subject to various market risks, includingthose caused by changes in interest rates, credit,foreign currency exchange rates and equity prices.Interest Rate RiskDebt outstanding at December 31, 2012 consisted offixed rate borrowings of $2.9 billion. Changes ininterest rates impact the fair values of fixed-rate debt,but do not impact earnings or cash flows. We did nothave any variable rate borrowings at December 31,2012.Credit RiskOur clearing houses act as the counterparties to alltrades consummated on our exchanges as well asthrough third-party exchanges and over-the-countermarkets for which we provide clearing services. As aresult, we are exposed to significant credit risk ofthird parties, including clearing firms. We are alsoexposed, indirectly, to the credit risk of customers ofour clearing firms. These parties may default on theirobligations due to bankruptcy, lack of liquidity,operational failure or other reasons.In November 2012, we acquired The Board of Tradeof Kansas City, Missouri, Inc. (KCBT), including theKansas City Board of Trade Clearing Corporation(KCBTCC). We expect to integrate KCBTCCoperations with the operations of CME Clearing, adivision of CME, during 2013. As of December 31,2012, we maintained a separate financial safeguardpackage for KCBTCC clearing firms. In February2013, the KCBTCC financial safeguard package wasincorporated into the CME Clearing financialsafeguard package.In order to ensure performance, we establish andmonitor financial requirements for our clearing firms.We set minimum performance bond requirements forexchange-traded and over-the-counter products,including credit default swaps and interest rateswaps. For CME and KCBTCC clearing firms, weestablish performance bond requirements to cover atleast 99% of expected price changes for a givenproduct within a given historical period with furtherquantitative and qualitative considerations based onmarket risk. For CMECE clearing firms, we establishperformance bond requirements to cover at least 95%to 99% of expected price changes for a given productwithin a given historical period with furtherquantitative and qualitative considerations based onmarket risk. We establish haircuts applied tocollateral deposited to meet performance bondrequirements to cover at least 99% of expected pricechanges and foreign currency changes for a givenasset within a given historical period with furtherquantitative and qualitative considerations. Haircutsvary depending on the type of collateral and maturity.We mark-to-market all open positions of CME,KCBTCC and CMECE clearing firms at least twice aday and require payment from clearing firms whosepositions have lost value and make payments toclearing firms whose positions have gained value.For select cleared-only markets, positions aremarked-to-market daily with the capability to mark-to-market more frequently as market conditionswarrant. These practices allow our clearing houses toquickly identify any clearing firms that may not beable to satisfy the financial obligations resulting fromchanges in the prices of their open positions beforethose financial obligations become exceptionallylarge and jeopardize the ability of our clearing houseto ensure performance of their open positions. Thistransparency makes it difficult for traders to hidelosses or disguise unusual profits.Although we have policies and procedures to helpensure that our clearing firms can satisfy theirobligations, these policies and procedures may notsucceed in detecting problems or preventing defaults.We also have in place various measures intended toenable us to cover any default and maintain liquidity.Despite our safeguards, we cannot assure you thatthese measures will be sufficient to protect us from adefault or that we will not be materially andadversely affected in the event of a significantdefault.CME ClearingWe maintain three separate financial safeguardpackages for CME Clearing member firms:• a financial safeguard package for all futuresand options contracts other than cleared over-the-counter credit default swap and interestrate swap contracts (base package),59
  • 70. • a financial safeguard package for clearedover-the-counter credit default swapcontracts, and• a financial safeguard package for clearedover-the-counter interest rate swap contracts.In the unlikely event of a payment default by aclearing firm, we would first apply assets of thedefaulting clearing firm to satisfy its paymentobligation. These assets include the defaulting firm’sguaranty fund contributions, performance bonds andany other available assets, such as assets required formembership and any associated trading rights. Inaddition, we would make a demand for paymentpursuant to any applicable guarantee provided to usby the parent company of the clearing firm.Thereafter, if the payment default remainsunsatisfied, we would use the corporate contributionsdesignated for the respective financial safeguardpackage. We would then use guaranty fundcontributions of other clearing firms within therespective financial safeguard package and fundscollected through an assessment against solventclearing firms within the respective financialsafeguard package to satisfy the deficit.We maintain a $5.0 billion 364-day multi-currencyline of credit with a consortium of domestic andinternational banks to be used in certain situations byCME Clearing. We have the option to request anincrease in the line from $5.0 billion to $7.0 billion.We may use the proceeds to provide temporaryliquidity in the unlikely event of a clearing firmdefault, in the event of a liquidity constraint ordefault by a depositary (custodian of the collateral),or in the event of a temporary disruption with thepayments systems that would delay payment ofsettlement variation between us and our clearingfirms. The credit agreement requires us to pledgecertain assets to the line of credit custodian prior todrawing on the line of credit. Pledged assets mayinclude clearing firm guaranty fund deposits held byus in the form of U.S. Treasury or agency securities,as well as select money market mutual fundsapproved for our select Interest Earning Facility(IEF) programs. Performance bond collateral of adefaulting clearing firm may also be used to secure adraw on the line. In addition to the 364-day multi-currency line of credit, we also have the option to useour $1.8 billion multi-currency revolving seniorcredit facility to provide liquidity for our clearinghouse in the unlikely event of default.Aggregate performance bond deposits for clearingfirms for all three CME financial safeguard packageswas $86.8 billion, including $5.6 billion of cashperformance bond deposits and $4.2 billion of lettersof credit. A defaulting firm’s performance bonddeposits can be used in the event of default of thatclearing firm.The following shows the available assets atDecember 31, 2012 in the event of a payment defaultby a clearing firm for the base financial safeguardpackage after first utilizing the defaulting firm’savailable assets:(in millions)CME ClearingAvailable AssetsDesignated corporate contributionsfor futures and options(1) . . . . . . . . $ 100.0Guaranty fund contributions(2) . . . . . 2,899.5Assessment powers(3) . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,973.6Minimum Total Assets Available forDefault(4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,973.1(1) CME Clearing designates $100.0 million ofcorporate contributions to satisfy a clearing firmdefault in the event that the defaulting clearingfirm’s guaranty contributions and performancebonds do not satisfy the deficit.(2) Guaranty fund contributions of clearing firmsinclude guaranty fund contributions required ofclearing firms, but do not include any excessdeposits held by us at the direction of clearingfirms.(3) In the event of a clearing firm default, if a losscontinues to exist after the utilization of theassets of the defaulted firm, our designatedworking capital and the non-defaulting clearingfirms’ guaranty fund contributions, we have theright to assess all non-defaulting clearingmembers as defined in the rules governing theguaranty fund.(4) Represents the aggregate minimum resourcesavailable to satisfy any obligations not met by adefaulting firm subsequent to the liquidation ofthe defaulting firm’s performance bondcollateral.60
  • 71. The following shows the available assets for thecredit default swap financial safeguard package atDecember 31, 2012 in the event of a payment defaultby a clearing firm that clears credit default swapcontracts, after first utilizing the defaulting firm’savailable assets:(in millions)CME ClearingAvailable AssetsDesignated corporate contributionsfor credit default swapcontracts(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 50.0Guaranty fund contributions(2) . . . . . 771.4Minimum Total Assets Available forDefault(3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $821.4(1) CME Clearing designates corporatecontributions to satisfy a clearing firm default inthe event that the defaulting clearing firm’sguaranty contributions and performance bondsdo not satisfy the deficit. The working capitalcontributed by us would be equal to the greaterof $50.0 million and 5% of the credit defaultswap guaranty fund, up to a maximum of $100.0million.(2) Guaranty fund contributions of clearing firmsfor credit default swap contracts includeguaranty fund contributions required of thoseclearing firms.(3) Represents the aggregate minimum resourcesavailable to satisfy any obligations not met by adefaulting firm subsequent to the liquidation ofthe defaulting firm’s performance bondcollateral. In the event of a clearing firm default,if a loss continues to exist after the utilization ofthe assets of the defaulted firm, our designatedworking capital and the non-defaulting firms’guaranty fund contributions, we have the right toassess all non-defaulting clearing members asdefined in the rules governing the credit defaultswap guaranty fund.The following shows the available assets for theinterest rate swap financial safeguard package atDecember 31, 2012 in the event of a payment defaultby a clearing firm that clears interest rate swapcontracts, after first utilizing the defaulting firm’savailable assets:(in millions)CME ClearingAvailable AssetsDesignated corporate contributionsfor interest rate swapcontracts(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 100.0Guaranty fund contributions(2) . . . . . 1,125.0Minimum Total Assets Available forDefault(3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,225.0(1) CME Clearing designates $100.0 million ofcorporate contributions to satisfy a clearing firmdefault in the event that the defaulting clearingfirm’s guaranty contributions and performancebonds do not satisfy the deficit.(2) Guaranty fund contributions of clearing firmsfor interest rate swap contracts include guarantyfund contributions required of those clearingfirms.(3) Represents the aggregate minimum resourcesavailable to satisfy any obligations not met by adefaulting firm subsequent to the liquidation ofthe defaulting firm’s performance bondcollateral. In the event of a clearing firm default,if a loss continues to exist after the utilization ofthe assets of the defaulted firm, our designatedworking capital and the non-defaulting firms’guaranty fund contributions, we have the right toassess all non-defaulting clearing members asdefined in the rules governing the interest rateswap guaranty fund.KCBTCCAt December 31, 2012, we maintained a separateguaranty fund for KCBTCC clearing firms.Aggregate performance bond deposits for KCBTCCclearing firms were $441.1 million, including $7.6million in cash performance bonds at December 31,2012. The guaranty fund contributions were $30.6million at December 31, 2012. This collateral wasincorporated into CME Clearing’s base package inFebruary 2013.61
  • 72. CMECEWe maintain a financial safeguard package forCMECE over-the-counter commodity clearing firms.In the unlikely event of default by a CMECE clearingfirm, we would first apply assets of the defaultingclearing firm to satisfy its payment obligations.These assets include the defaulting firm’sperformance bonds. Aggregate cash performancebond deposits for CMECE clearing firms were $54.5million. There were no non-cash performance bondson deposit at December 31, 2012. Thereafter, if thedefault remains unsatisfied after first applying assetsof the defaulting clearing firm to satisfy its paymentobligation, we would use guaranty fund contributionsof $60.0 million of CMECE funds for commodityclearing firms. As of December 31, 2012, guarantyfund contributions were contributed by CMECEinstead of by the clearing firms. Commodity clearingfirms will begin contributing to the commodityguaranty fund in 2013. Once the CMECE clearingfirms contribute to the commodity guaranty fund, wewould still use at least $20.0 million of CMECEfunds in addition to the clearing firms’ guaranty fundcontributions in the event of a default of acommodity clearing firm.Beginning in 2013, we will maintain a separatefinancial safeguard package for CMECE interest rateswap clearing firms. CMECE will begin offering toclear interest rate swap contracts in the first quarterof 2013. In the unlikely event of default by aCMECE clearing firm, we will first apply assets ofthe defaulting clearing firm to satisfy its paymentobligations. If the default remains unsatisfied, wewill apply guaranty fund contributions of $52.5million for interest rate swap clearing firms that willbe contributed by CMECE instead of by the clearingfirms. In the future, the interest rate swap clearingfirms may be asked to contribute to the interest rateswap guaranty fund. Once the CMECE clearing firmscontribute to the guaranty fund, we would still use atleast $52.5 million of CMECE funds in the event of adefault of a interest rate swap clearing firm.Foreign Currency Exchange Rate RiskForeign Currency Transaction RiskOur exposure to foreign currency transaction riskresulting from our operations is considered minimaland is not expected to be material to our financialcondition or operating results.Foreign Currency Translation RiskWe have foreign currency translation risk related tothe translation of our foreign subsidiaries’ assets andliabilities from their respective functional currenciesto the U.S. dollar at each reporting date. Fluctuationsin exchange rates may impact the amount of assetsand liabilities we report in our consolidated balancesheets. The financial statements of certain of ourforeign subsidiaries are denominated in variouscurrencies and are translated into U.S. dollars using acurrent exchange rate. Gains and losses resultingfrom this translation are recognized as a foreigncurrency translation adjustment within accumulatedother comprehensive income, which is a componentof shareholders’ equity and comprehensive income.Aggregate translation adjustments, net of tax, for2012, 2011 and 2010 were $10.9 million, $83.3million and $(0.5) million, respectively. In 2011, wereversed an unrealized loss of $81.7 million, net oftax, which was attributable to foreign currencytranslation adjustments that were recorded inaccumulated other comprehensive income (loss)upon recognizing impairment on our investment inBM&FBOVESPA.Foreign Currency Risk Related to Equity InvestmentsWe are also exposed to foreign currency exchangerate risk related to certain equity investments asdiscussed in the Equity Price Risk section below.Foreign Currency Exchange Risk Related toCustomer CollateralA portion of performance bond deposits isdenominated in foreign currency. We mark-to-marketall deposits once a day and require payment fromclearing firms whose collateral has lost value due tochanges in foreign currency rates and price.Therefore, our exposure to foreign currency riskrelated to performance bond deposits is consideredminimal and is not expected to be material to ourfinancial condition or operating results.Equity Price RiskWe hold certain investments in equity securities forstrategic purposes. Investments subject to equityprice risks are generally recorded at their fair value.Fair values for publicly-traded equity investments arebased on quoted market prices. Fair values are62
  • 73. subject to fluctuation and, consequently, the amountrealized in the subsequent sale of an investment maydiffer significantly from its current reported value.Fluctuations in the market price of a security mayresult from perceived changes in the underlyingeconomic characteristics of the issuer, the relativeprice of alternative investments and general marketconditions.The table below summarizes equity investments that are subject to equity price fluctuations at December 31,2012. Equity investments are included in other assets in our consolidated balance sheets.(in millions)CostBasisFairValueCarryingValueUnrealizedGain,Net of TaxBM&FBOVESPA S.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $262.9 $690.6 $690.6 $271.4Bolsa Mexicana de Valores, S.A.B. de C.V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.3 29.3 29.3 7.6IMAREX ASA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — 1.8 1.8 1.1We do not currently hedge against equity price risk.Equity investments are assessed for other-than-temporary impairment on a quarterly basis.63
  • 74. ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATACME GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIESCONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS(dollars in millions, except per share data; shares in thousands)December 31,2012 2011AssetsCurrent Assets:Cash and cash equivalents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,604.7 $ 1,042.3Marketable securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56.6 47.6Accounts receivable, net of allowance of $0.8 and $1.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267.5 289.4Other current assets (includes $40.0 in restricted cash) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204.3 232.6Cash performance bonds and guaranty fund contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,584.8 9,333.9Total current assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,717.9 10,945.8Property, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 724.0 821.9Intangible assets—trading products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,175.3 17,040.5Intangible assets—other, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,853.7 3,312.8Goodwill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,566.9 7,984.0Other assets (includes $73.0 and $20.5 in restricted cash) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,825.4 653.7Total Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,863.2 $40,758.7Liabilities and EquityCurrent Liabilities:Accounts payable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 41.7 $ 31.1Short-term debt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 749.7 —Other current liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240.7 250.2Cash performance bonds and guaranty fund contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,584.8 9,333.9Total current liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,616.9 9,615.2Long-term debt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,106.8 2,106.8Deferred income tax liabilities, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,413.3 7,226.8Other liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220.5 187.6Total Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,357.5 19,136.4Redeemable non-controlling interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80.8 70.3CME Group Shareholders’ Equity:Preferred stock, $0.01 par value, 10,000 and 9,860 shares authorized as of December 31, 2012and 2011, respectively; none issued or outstanding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — —Series A junior participating preferred stock, $0.01 par value, 0 and 140 shares authorized atDecember 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively; none issued or outstanding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — —Class A common stock, $0.01 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized, 331,832 and 330,653shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3 3.3Class B common stock, $0.01 par value, 3 shares authorized, issued and outstanding . . . . . . . . . . — —Additional paid-in capital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,213.1 17,112.5Retained earnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,993.4 4,324.6Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209.3 111.6Total CME Group shareholders’ equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21,419.1 21,552.0Non-controlling interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.8 —Total Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21,424.9 21,552.0Total Liabilities and Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,863.2 $40,758.7See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.64
  • 75. CME GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIESCONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME(dollars in millions, except per share data; shares in thousands)Year Ended December 31,2012 2011 2010RevenuesClearing and transaction fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,371.5 $ 2,710.9 $ 2,486.3Market data and information services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387.1 427.7 395.1Access and communication fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88.8 49.2 45.4Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67.2 92.8 76.9Total Revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,914.6 3,280.6 3,003.7ExpensesCompensation and benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496.7 475.7 432.1Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.1 42.3 40.6Technology support services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.7 52.1 50.5Professional fees and outside services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126.8 126.1 117.5Amortization of purchased intangibles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116.2 132.0 128.1Depreciation and amortization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136.9 128.5 129.9Occupancy and building operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77.0 77.5 74.9Licensing and other fee agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82.6 84.9 82.6Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95.6 140.4 116.4Total Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,222.6 1,259.5 1,172.6Operating Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,692.0 2,021.1 1,831.1Non-Operating Income (Expense)Investment income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38.7 36.7 42.3Impairment of long-term investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — — (2.2)Gains (losses) on derivative investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (0.1) (0.1) (2.6)Interest and other borrowing costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (132.2) (116.9) (140.3)Equity in net gains (losses) of unconsolidated subsidiaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.7 (4.3) (6.4)Other non-operating income (expense) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64.3 — —Total Non-Operating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4 (84.6) (109.2)Income before Income Taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,693.4 1,936.5 1,721.9Income tax provision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 786.7 122.1 769.8Net Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 906.7 1,814.4 952.1Less: net income attributable to non-controlling interests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.4 2.1 0.7Net Income Attributable to CME Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 896.3 $ 1,812.3 $ 951.4Earnings per Common Share Attributable to CME Group:Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2.71 $ 5.45 $ 2.87Diluted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.70 5.43 2.86Weighted Average Number of Common Shares:Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331,252 332,737 331,493Diluted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332,319 333,811 332,475See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.65
  • 76. CME GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIESCONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME(in millions)Year Ended December 31,2012 2011 2010Net income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 906.7 $1,814.4 $952.1Other comprehensive income, net of tax:Investment securities:Net unrealized holding gains arising during the period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174.7 166.4 10.1Reclassification adjustment for gains included in net income . . . . . . . . . (1.8) — (1.2)Income tax expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (64.6) (23.7) (3.6)Investment securities, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108.3 142.7 5.3Defined benefit plans:Net change in defined benefit plans arising during the period . . . . . . . . . (13.0) (19.1) 7.5Amortization of net actuarial losses included in pension expense . . . . . . 2.5 1.7 2.1Income tax benefit (expense) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2 6.5 (3.8)Defined benefit plans, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (6.3) (10.9) 5.8Derivative investments:Net unrealized holding gains (losses) arising during the period . . . . . . . (25.3) — (9.7)Ineffectiveness on cash flow hedges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.1 0.1 8.6Amortization of effective portion of loss on cash flow hedges . . . . . . . . 1.1 0.8 20.0Income tax benefit (expense) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.0 (0.3) (7.4)Derivative investments, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (15.1) 0.6 11.5Foreign currency translation:Foreign currency translation adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1.3) 96.6 (0.9)Reclassification adjustment for loss included in net income . . . . . . . . . . 18.4 — —Income tax benefit (expense) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (6.2) (13.3) 0.4Foreign currency translation, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.9 83.3 (0.5)Other comprehensive income, net of tax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97.8 215.7 22.1Comprehensive income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,004.5 2,030.1 974.2Less: comprehensive income attributable to non-controlling interests . . . . . . . . . . 10.5 2.1 0.7Comprehensive income attributable to CME Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 994.0 $2,028.0 $973.5See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.66
  • 77. CME GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIESCONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EQUITY(dollars in millions, except per share data; shares in thousands)Class ACommonStock(Shares)Class BCommonStock(Shares)CommonStock andAdditionalPaid-inCapitalRetainedEarningsAccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncome (Loss)Total CMEGroupShareholders’EquityNon-controllingInterestTotalEquityBalance atDecember 31,2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . 332,567 3 $17,187.3 $2,239.9 $(126.2) $19,301.0 $— $19,301.0Net incomeattributable to CMEGroup and non-controllinginterest . . . . . . . . . . 951.4 951.4 951.4Other comprehensiveincome attributableto CME Group . . . . 22.1 22.1 22.1Dividends oncommon stock of$0.92 per share . . . (305.5) (305.5) (305.5)Class A commonstock issued toBM&FBOVESPAS.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,032 607.1 607.1 607.1Repurchase ofClass A commonstock . . . . . . . . . . . (10,034) (575.3) (575.3) (575.3)Exercise of stockoptions . . . . . . . . . . 448 12.6 12.6 12.6Excess tax benefitsfrom optionexercises andrestricted stockvesting . . . . . . . . . . 5.8 5.8 5.8Vesting of issuedrestricted Class Acommon stock . . . . 173 (3.8) (3.8) (3.8)Shares issued toBoard ofDirectors . . . . . . . . 37 2.4 2.4 2.4Shares issued underEmployee StockPurchase Plan . . . . 22 1.4 1.4 1.4Stock-basedcompensation . . . . 40.9 40.9 40.9Balance atDecember 31,2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . 334,245 3 $17,278.4 $2,885.8 $(104.1) $20,060.1 $— $20,060.1See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.67
  • 78. CME GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIESCONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EQUITY (continued)(dollars in millions, except per share data; shares in thousands)Class ACommonStock(Shares)Class BCommonStock(Shares)CommonStock andAdditionalPaid-inCapitalRetainedEarningsAccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncome (Loss)Total CMEGroupShareholders’EquityNon-controllingInterestTotalEquityBalance atDecember 31,2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334,245 3 $17,278.4 $2,885.8 $(104.1) $20,060.1 $— $20,060.1Net income attributableto CME Group andnon-controllinginterest . . . . . . . . . . . 1,812.3 1,812.3 1,812.3Other comprehensiveincome attributable toCME Group . . . . . . . 215.7 215.7 215.7Dividends on commonstock of $1.12 pershare . . . . . . . . . . . . . (373.5) (373.5) (373.5)Repurchase of Class Acommon stock . . . . . (4,048) (220.4) (220.4) (220.4)Exercise of stockoptions . . . . . . . . . . . 170 5.8 5.8 5.8Excess tax benefitsfrom option exercisesand restricted stockvesting . . . . . . . . . . . 0.6 0.6 0.6Vesting of issuedrestricted Class Acommon stock . . . . . 213 (3.8) (3.8) (3.8)Shares issued to Boardof Directors . . . . . . . . 41 2.3 2.3 2.3Shares issued underEmployee StockPurchase Plan . . . . . . 32 1.6 1.6 1.6Stock-basedcompensation . . . . . . 51.3 51.3 51.3Balance atDecember 31,2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330,653 3 $17,115.8 $4,324.6 $ 111.6 $21,552.0 $— $21,552.0See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.68
  • 79. CME GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIESCONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EQUITY (continued)(dollars in millions, except per share data; shares in thousands)Class ACommonStock(Shares)Class BCommonStock(Shares)CommonStock andAdditionalPaid-inCapitalRetainedEarningsAccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncome (Loss)Total CMEGroupShareholders’EquityNon-controllingInterestTotalEquityBalance atDecember 31,2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330,653 3 $17,115.8 $ 4,324.6 $111.6 $21,552.0 $— $21,552.0Net income attributableto CME Group andnon-controllinginterest . . . . . . . . . . . 896.3 896.3 896.3Other comprehensiveincome attributableto CME Group . . . . . 97.7 97.7 97.7Dividends on commonstock of $3.70 pershare . . . . . . . . . . . . (1,227.5) (1,227.5) (1,227.5)Non-controllinginterest resultingfrom acquisition ofKansas City Boardof Trade . . . . . . . . . . 5.8 5.8Tax benefits fromIndex Servicespartnershipallocation . . . . . . . . . 18.6 18.6 18.6Exercise of stockoptions . . . . . . . . . . . 745 22.1 22.1 22.1Excess tax benefitsfrom optionexercises andrestricted stockvesting . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6 4.6 4.6Vesting of issuedrestricted Class Acommon stock . . . . . 366 (9.8) (9.8) (9.8)Shares issued to Boardof Directors . . . . . . . 40 2.1 2.1 2.1Shares issued underEmployee StockPurchase Plan . . . . . 28 1.6 1.6 1.6Stock-basedcompensation . . . . . 61.4 61.4 61.4Balance atDecember 31,2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331,832 3 $17,216.4 $ 3,993.4 $209.3 $21,419.1 $ 5.8 $21,424.9See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.69
  • 80. CME GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIESCONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS(in millions)Year Ended December 31,2012 2011 2010Cash Flows from Operating ActivitiesNet income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 906.7 $1,814.4 $ 952.1Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operatingactivities:Stock-based compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61.4 51.3 40.9Amortization of purchased intangibles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116.2 132.0 128.1Depreciation and amortization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136.9 128.5 129.9Net loss on derivative investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.1 0.1 8.6Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — — 20.5Impairment of long-term investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — — 2.2MF Global accounts receivable write-off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — 21.7 —Amortization of debt financing costs and discount accretion . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 4.9 4.9Gain on sale of Index Services assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — (9.8) —Gain on contribution of Dow Jones Index asset group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (78.8) — —Loss on sale of Credit Market Analysis Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19.9 — —Equity in net (gains) losses of unconsolidated subsidiaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . (30.7) 4.3 6.4Deferred income taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82.2 (658.7) 22.3Change in:Accounts receivable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (0.3) (13.2) (28.7)Other current assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (18.2) (69.4) (29.9)Other assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (50.7) (27.1) (2.9)Accounts payable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.2 (21.0) 6.1Income taxes payable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71.9 (18.0) 12.4Other current liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (5.6) (6.6) 79.6Other liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (10.3) 13.2 5.3Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (0.4) (0.3) 1.8Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,216.8 1,346.3 1,359.6Cash Flows from Investing ActivitiesProceeds from maturities and sales of available-for-sale marketablesecurities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29.5 11.3 11.9Purchases of available-for-sale marketable securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (32.5) (10.2) (10.2)Purchases of property, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (141.8) (172.2) (160.0)Proceeds from sale of building property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151.5 — —Cash paid in business combinations, net of cash acquired . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (162.9) — (19.6)Investments in business ventures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (67.8) — (17.4)Proceeds from sale of Credit Market Analysis Ltd., net of cash sold withbusiness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42.4 — —Proceeds from sale of Index Services assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — 18.0 —Proceeds from sale of long-term investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — — 47.2Proceeds from Chicago Board Options Exchange exercise right privileges . . . . . — — 39.7Settlement of derivative related to debt issuance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (24.4) — (3.2)Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — (0.5) —Net Cash Used in Investing Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (206.0) (153.6) (111.6)See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.70
  • 81. CME GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIESCONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (continued)(in millions)Year Ended December 31,2012 2011 2010Cash Flows from Financing ActivitiesRepayments of commercial paper, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ — $ — $ (99.9)Proceeds from other borrowings, net of issuance costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 747.7 — 608.0Repayment of other borrowings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — (420.5) (300.0)Cash dividends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1,224.3) (372.8) (305.3)Class A common stock issued to BM&FBOVESPA SA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — — 607.1Repurchase of Class A common stock, including costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — (220.4) (575.3)Proceeds from exercise of stock options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22.1 5.8 12.6Distribution paid to non-controlling interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — — (607.5)Excess tax benefits related to employee option exercises and restricted stockvesting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6 0.6 5.8Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 1.7 1.1Net Cash Used in Financing Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (448.4) (1,005.6) (653.4)Net change in cash and cash equivalents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562.4 187.1 594.6Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,042.3 855.2 260.6Cash and Cash Equivalents, End of Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,604.7 $ 1,042.3 $ 855.2Supplemental Disclosure of Cash Flow InformationIncome taxes paid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 624.4 $ 816.1 $ 765.9Interest paid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110.6 111.9 104.9Non-cash investing activities:Investment in S&P/Dow Jones Indices LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 878.4 — —See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.71
  • 82. CME GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIESNOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS1. ORGANIZATION AND BUSINESSChicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. (CME), the Boardof Trade of the City of Chicago, Inc. (CBOT), NewYork Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX),Commodity Exchange, Inc. (COMEX), The Board ofTrade of Kansas City, Missouri, Inc. (KCBT),wholly-owned subsidiaries of CME Group Inc. (CMEGroup), are designated contract markets for thetrading of futures and options on futures contracts.CME, CBOT, NYMEX, COMEX, KCBT and theirsubsidiaries are referred to collectively as “theexchange” in the notes to the consolidated financialstatements. CME Group and its subsidiaries arereferred to collectively as “the company” in the notesto the consolidated financial statements.CME Group offers a wide range of productsincluding those based on interest rates, equities,foreign exchange, agricultural commodities, energyand metals. CME Group also offers clearing servicesfor cleared over-the-counter derivatives includingcredit default swaps and interest rate swaps as well asother swaps and forwards. Trades are executedthrough CME Group’s electronic trading platform,open outcry and privately negotiated transactions.Through its U.S. clearing houses, CME Group offersclearing, settlement and guarantees for all productscleared through the exchange. In 2011, CMEClearing Europe (CMECE) began providing clearingservices for various over-the-counter derivatives inEurope.On March 18, 2010, CBOT acquired a 90%ownership interest in CME Group Index ServicesLLC (Index Services), a joint venture with DowJones & Company (Dow Jones). The financialstatements and accompanying notes presented in thisreport include the financial results of Index Servicesbeginning on March 19, 2010. Index Services creates,maintains and licenses the globally-recognized DowJones indexes. The indexes are used as benchmarksand as the basis of investment products. In June2012, the company contributed certain Dow JonesIndex assets and liabilities (DJI asset group) ownedby Index Services to S&P/Dow Jones Indices LLC(S&P/DJI), a new business venture with TheMcGraw-Hill Companies Inc. (McGraw). Dow Jonesretains a 10% non-controlling interest in IndexServices. The company also sold Credit MarketAnalysis Ltd. (CMA) to McGraw in conjunction withthe creation of the business venture. Assets andliabilities contributed or sold as part of thistransaction are excluded from the company’sconsolidated financial statements and accompanyingnotes beginning on June 30, 2012, while the financialresults of the company’s 24.4% interest in the newbusiness venture with McGraw are included in thecompany’s consolidated financial statements andaccompanying notes beginning on June 30, 2012.CBOT acquired KCBT and its subsidiaries, theKansas City Board of Trade Clearing Corporation(KCBTCC) and the Board of Trade InvestmentCompany (BOTIC), on November 30, 2012. KCBTmaintains a 51% controlling interest in BOTIC,resulting in a nonredeemable non-controlling interestincluded in the company’s consolidated statements ofequity. The financial statements and accompanyingnotes presented in this report include the financialresults of KCBT beginning on November 30, 2012.2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANTACCOUNTING POLICIESBasis of Presentation. The accompanyingconsolidated financial statements are prepared inaccordance with accounting principles generallyaccepted in the United States of America and includethe accounts of the company and its majority-ownedsubsidiaries. All intercompany transactions andbalances have been eliminated.Use of Estimates. The preparation of consolidatedfinancial statements requires management to makeestimates and assumptions that affect the reportedamounts and the disclosure of contingent amounts inthe consolidated financial statements andaccompanying notes. Estimates are based onhistorical experience, where applicable, andassumptions management believes are reasonableunder the circumstances. Due to the inherentuncertainty involved with estimates, actual resultsmay differ.Cash and Cash Equivalents. Cash and cashequivalents consist of cash and highly liquidinvestments with a maturity of three months or less atthe time of purchase.72
  • 83. Financial Investments. The company maintainsshort-term and long-term investments, classified asavailable-for-sale or trading securities. Available-for-sale investments are carried at their fair value, withunrealized gains and losses, net of deferred incometaxes, reported as a component of accumulated othercomprehensive income. Trading securities held inconnection with non-qualified deferred compensationplans are recorded at fair value, with net realized andunrealized gains and losses and dividend incomereported as investment income. The company alsomaintains long-term investments accounted for underthe equity method.The company reviews its investments to determinewhether a decline in fair value below the cost basis isother-than-temporary. If events and circumstancesindicate that a decline in the value of the assets hasoccurred and is deemed to be other-than-temporary,the carrying value of the investments is reduced to itsfair value and a corresponding impairment is chargedto earnings.Fair Value of Financial Instruments. The companyuses a three-level classification hierarchy of fairvalue measurements that establishes the quality ofinputs used to measure fair value. The fair value of afinancial instrument is the amount that would bereceived to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liabilityin an orderly transaction between market participantsat the measurement date. The fair value of financialinstruments is determined using various techniquesthat involve some level of estimation and judgment,the degree of which is dependent on the pricetransparency and the complexity of the instruments.Derivative Investments. The company usesderivative instruments, designated as cash flowhedges, to limit exposure to changes in interest rates.Derivatives are recorded at fair value in theconsolidated balance sheets. The effective portion ofthe changes in the fair value of cash flow hedges aredeferred in accumulated other comprehensiveincome. Any realized gains and losses from effectivehedges are classified in the consolidated statementsof income, and any ineffective or excluded portion ofa hedge is recognized in earnings immediately.Accounts Receivable. Accounts receivable arecomposed of trade receivables and unbilled revenueincluding clearing and transaction fees and marketdata and information services revenue. All accountsreceivable are stated at cost. A significant portion ofaccounts receivable and revenues are from clearingfirms that are also required to be shareholders of thecompany. Exposure to losses on receivables forclearing and transaction fees and other amounts owedby clearing firms is dependent on each clearingfirm’s financial condition, the Class A shares as wellas the memberships that collateralize fees owed to theexchange. The exchange retains the right to liquidateshares to satisfy a clearing firm’s receivable. Theallowance for doubtful accounts is calculated basedon historical losses and management’s assessment ofprobable future collections.Performance Bonds and Guaranty FundContributions. Performance bonds and guarantyfund contributions held by CME, CMECE orKCBTCC for clearing firms may be in the form ofcash, securities or other non-cash deposits.Performance bonds and guaranty fund contributionsreceived in the form of cash are held by CME,CMECE or KCBTCC and may be invested overnightin U.S. Government securities acquired through andheld by a broker-dealer subsidiary of a bank, reverserepurchase agreements secured with highly ratedgovernment securities, money market funds orthrough CME’s selected Interest Earning Facility(IEF) program. Any interest earned on theseinvestments accrues to CME, CMECE or KCBTCCand is included in investment income in theconsolidated statements of income. Because thebenefits and risks of ownership accrue to CME,CMECE or KCBTCC, cash performance bonds andguaranty fund contributions are reflected in theconsolidated balance sheets.Securities and other non-cash deposits may includeU.S. Treasury securities, U.S. Government agencysecurities, Eurobonds, corporate bonds, other foreigngovernment securities and gold bullion. Securitiesand other non-cash deposits are held in safekeepingby a custodian bank. Interest and gains or losses onsecurities deposited to satisfy performance bond andguaranty fund requirements accrue to the clearingfirm. Because the benefits and risks of ownershipaccrue to the clearing firm, non-cash performancebonds and guaranty fund contributions are notreflected in the consolidated balance sheets.73
  • 84. Cash contributed by CMECE to CMECE guarantyfunds is classified as restricted cash and is includedin other current assets and other assets in theconsolidated balance sheets.Property, Equipment and LeaseholdImprovements. Property, equipment and leaseholdimprovements are stated at cost, less accumulateddepreciation and amortization. Depreciation andamortization are calculated using the straight-linemethod, generally over two to thirty-nine years.Property and equipment are depreciated over theirestimated useful lives. Leasehold improvements areamortized over the shorter of the remaining term ofthe respective lease to which they relate or theremaining useful life of the leasehold improvement.Land is reported at cost. Internal and external costsincurred in developing or obtaining computersoftware for internal use are capitalized andamortized on a straight-line basis over the estimateduseful life of the software, generally three years.Operating Leases. All leases in which the companyis the tenant are accounted for as operating leases.Landlord allowances are recorded as a reduction torent expense on a straight-line basis over the term ofthe lease.Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets. Thecompany tests goodwill and indefinite-livedintangible assets for impairment annually andwhenever events or circumstances indicate that theircarrying values may not be recoverable. Goodwillrepresents the excess of the purchase price over thefair value of the net assets acquired in a businesscombination. The company may test goodwillquantitatively for impairment by comparing thecarrying value of a reporting unit to its estimated fairvalue. Estimating the fair value of a reporting unitinvolves significant judgments inherent in theanalysis including estimating the amount of andtiming of future cash flows and the selection ofappropriate discount rates and long-term growth rateassumptions. Changes in these estimates andassumptions could materially affect the determinationof fair value of the reporting unit. If the carryingamount exceeds fair value, impairment is recorded.In certain circumstances, goodwill may be reviewedqualitatively for indications of impairment withoututilizing valuation techniques to estimate fair value.The company evaluates the recoverability ofindefinite-lived intangible assets by comparing theestimated fair value of the intangible asset to itscarrying value. If the indefinite-lived intangible assetcarrying value exceeds its fair value, an impairmentloss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess.Estimating the fair value of indefinite-livedintangible assets involves the use of valuationtechniques that rely on significant estimates andassumptions including forecasted revenue growthrates, forecasted allocations of expense and risk-adjusted discount rates. Changes in these estimatesand assumptions could materially affect thedetermination of fair value for indefinite-livedintangible assets. In certain circumstances, indefinite-lived intangible assets may be reviewed qualitativelyfor indications of impairment without utilizingvaluation techniques to estimate fair value. Forfurther information on intangible assets and goodwill,see note 7.Business Combinations. The company accounts forbusiness combinations using the purchase method.The method requires the acquirer to recognize theassets acquired, liabilities assumed, and any non-controlling interest in the acquiree at the acquisitiondate, measured at their fair values as of that date. Thecompany may use independent valuation services toassist in determining the estimated fair values.Employee Benefit Plans. The company recognizesthe funded status of defined benefit postretirementplans in its consolidated balance sheets. Changes inthat funded status are recognized in the year ofchange in other comprehensive income (loss). Planassets and obligations are measured at year end. Thecompany recognizes future changes in actuarial gainsand losses and prior service costs in the year in whichthe changes occur through other comprehensiveincome (loss).Foreign Currency Translation. Foreigndenominated assets and liabilities are re-measuredinto the functional currency using period-endexchange rates. Gains and losses from foreigncurrency transactions are included in other expense inthe accompanying consolidated statements ofincome. When the functional currency differs fromthe reporting currency, revenues and expenses offoreign subsidiaries are translated from theirfunctional currencies into U.S. dollars usingweighted-average exchange rates while their assetsand liabilities are translated into U.S. dollars usingperiod-end exchange rates. Gains and losses resulting74
  • 85. from foreign currency translations are included inaccumulated other comprehensive income (loss)within shareholders’ equity.Revenue Recognition. Revenue recognition policiesfor specific sources of revenue are discussed below.Clearing and Transaction Fees. Clearing andtransaction fees include per contract charges fortrade execution, clearing, trading on thecompany’s electronic trading platform and otherfees. Fees are charged at various rates based onthe product traded, the method of trade, theexchange trading privileges of the customermaking the trade and the type of contractcleared. Clearing and transaction fees arerecognized as revenue when a buy and sell orderare matched and the trade is cleared. Therefore,unfilled or canceled buy and sell orders have noimpact on revenue. On occasion, the customer’sexchange trading privileges may not be properlyentered by the clearing firm and incorrect feesare charged for the transactions. When thisinformation is corrected within the time periodallowed by the exchange, a fee adjustment isprovided to the clearing firm. A reserve isestablished for estimated fee adjustments toreflect corrections to customer exchange tradingprivileges. The reserve is based on the historicalpattern of adjustments processed as well asspecific adjustment requests. The companybelieves the allowances are adequate to coverestimated adjustments.Market Data and Information Services. Marketdata and information services represent revenueearned for the dissemination of marketinformation. Revenues are accrued each monthbased on the number of devices reported byvendors. The exchange conducts periodicexaminations of the number of devices reportedand assesses additional fees as necessary. Onoccasion, customers will pay for services in alump sum payment; however, revenue isrecognized as services are provided.Access and Communication Fees. Access feesare the connectivity charges to customers of thecompany’s electronic trading platform that arealso used by market data vendors and customers.The fees include co-location fees, access fees forthe electronic trading platform, line charges andhardware rental charges and can vary dependingon the type of connection provided. Anadditional installation fee may be chargeddepending on the type of service requested and adisconnection fee may also be charged if certainconditions are met. Revenue is generallyrecognized monthly as the service is provided.Communication fees consist of equipment rentaland usage charges to customers and firms thatutilize the various telecommunications networksand services in the Chicago and New York Cityfacilities. Revenue is billed and recognized on amonthly basis.Other Revenues. Other revenues includerevenues from the rental of commercial spacethat are recognized over the lease term using thestraight-line method. Under this method,revenue is recorded evenly over the entire termof occupancy for leases with scheduled rentincreases or rent abatements. Allowances forconstruction and other tenant costs areconsidered lease incentives and are recorded asa reduction to rental income on a straight-linebasis over the term of the lease. In April 2012,the company sold the north and south towers ofthe CBOT building and subsequently leasedback a portion of the property, which resulted ina decrease in revenue.Also included in revenue are ancillary chargesfor parking, utilities, and miscellaneous servicesprovided to tenants. In addition, processingservices revenue is included in other revenue.Processing services includes revenue generatedfrom various strategic relationships.Concentration of Revenue. Two firms eachrepresented 12% of the company’s clearing andtransaction fees revenue in 2012. In 2011, onefirm represented 12% of the company’s clearingand transaction fees revenue. One firmrepresented 13% and one firm represented 12%of the company’s clearing and transaction feesrevenue in 2010. Should a clearing firmwithdraw from the exchange, managementbelieves that the customer portion of that firm’strading activity would likely transfer to anotherclearing firm. Therefore, management does notbelieve that the company is exposed tosignificant risk from the ongoing loss of revenuereceived from a particular clearing firm.75
  • 86. The two largest resellers of market datarepresented approximately 43% of market dataand information services revenue in 2012, 39%in 2011, and 45% in 2010. Should one of thesevendors no longer subscribe to the company’smarket data, management believes that themajority of that firm’s customers would likelysubscribe to the market data through anotherreseller. Therefore, management does notbelieve that the company is exposed tosignificant risk from a loss of revenue receivedfrom any particular market data reseller.Share-Based Payments. The company accounts forshare-based payments using a fair value method,which is based on the grant date price of the equityawards issued. The company recognizes expenserelating to stock-based compensation on anaccelerated basis. As a result, the expense associatedwith each vesting date within a stock grant isrecognized over the period of time that each portionof that grant vests. The company estimates expectedforfeitures of stock grants.Marketing Costs. Marketing costs are incurred forthe production and communication of advertising aswell as other marketing activities. These costs areexpensed when incurred, except for costs related tothe production of broadcast advertising, which areexpensed when the first broadcast occurs.Income Taxes. Deferred income taxes arise fromtemporary differences between the tax basis and bookbasis of assets and liabilities. A valuation allowanceis recognized if it is anticipated that some or all of adeferred tax asset may not be realized. The companyaccounts for uncertainty in income taxes recognizedin its consolidated financial statements by using amore-likely-than-not recognition threshold based onthe technical merits of the tax position taken orexpected to be taken. The company classifies interestand penalties related to uncertain tax positions inincome tax expense.Segment Reporting. The company reports theresults of its operations as one operating segmentprimarily comprised of CME, CBOT, NYMEX,COMEX and KCBT exchanges. The remainingoperations do not meet the thresholds for reportingseparate segment information.3. BUSINESS TRANSACTIONSFormation of S&P/DJI Indices LLCOn June 29, 2012, CME Group, Index Services andMcGraw completed the formation of a new indexbusiness venture, S&P/DJI. The company contributedthe DJI asset group owned by Index Services to S&P/DJI. On a consolidated basis, CME Group has a totalinterest of 27.0% in S&P/DJI. Excluding theownership interest attributable to Dow Jones throughits non-controlling interest in Index Services, CMEGroup has a 24.4% interest in S&P/DJI. As a resultof its contribution, Index Services derecognized theDJI asset group and recorded a $78.8 million gainincluded in other non-operating income in theconsolidated statements of income.Sale of Credit Market Analysis Ltd.On June 29, 2012, the company sold CMA toMcGraw for $45.9 million in conjunction with theformation of S&P/DJI. As a result, the companyrecognized a $19.9 million loss, which was includedin other non-operating expense in the consolidatedstatements of income. The loss includes a previouslyunrecognized foreign currency translation adjustmentof $18.4 million.Acquisition of The Board of Trade of Kansas City,Missouri, Inc.On November 30, 2012, CME Group purchasedKCBT, the leading derivatives market for hard redwinter wheat, for $126.0 million in cash. Thisacquisition provides a growth opportunity for thecompany by complementing existing products and byproviding new opportunities for customers to managetheir global wheat price risk.Under the accounting guidance for businesscombinations, the purchase price of $126.0 millionwas allocated to KCBT’s net tangible and identifiableintangible assets based on their estimated fair valuesas of the acquisition date. The excess of the purchaseprice over the net tangible assets and identifiableintangible assets was recorded as goodwill. Based onthe purchase price allocation, CME Group recorded$134.8 million of identifiable intangible assets, $28.6million of goodwill and $46.5 million of deferred taxliabilities.76
  • 87. 4. MARKETABLE SECURITIESAvailable-for-Sale Securities. Certain marketablesecurities have been classified as available-for-sale.The amortized cost and fair value of these securitiesat December 31 were as follows:2012 2011(in millions)AmortizedCostFairValueAmortizedCostFairValueU.S. Treasury . . . . . . $17.5 $17.5 $ 5.1 $ 5.1Asset-backsecurities . . . . . . . 0.8 0.4 1.1 0.9U.S. Governmentagency . . . . . . . . . — — 4.9 5.3Municipal bonds . . . — — 4.1 4.5Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18.3 $17.9 $15.2 $15.8Net unrealized gains (losses) on marketable securitiesclassified as available-for-sale are reported as acomponent of other comprehensive income (loss) andincluded in the accompanying consolidatedstatements of comprehensive income andconsolidated statements of equity.The fair value and gross unrealized losses of asset-backed securities were $0.4 million and $0.4 million,respectively, at December 31, 2012. The asset-backed securities were in an unrealized loss positionfor more than 12 months at December 31, 2012 andwere deemed not to be other-than-temporarilyimpaired. The company has the ability and intent tohold these asset-backed securities until a recovery offair value, which may be at maturity, and does notconsider these asset-backed securities to be other-than-temporarily impaired at December 31, 2012.The amortized cost and fair value of marketablesecurities at December 31, 2012, by contractualmaturity, were as follows:(in millions)AmortizedCostFairValueMaturity of one year or less . . . . . $17.5 $17.5Maturity between one and fiveyears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — —Maturity between five and tenyears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — —Maturity greater than ten years . . 0.8 0.4Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18.3 $17.9Trading Securities. CME maintains additionalinvestments in a diverse portfolio of mutual fundsrelated to its non-qualified deferred compensationplans (note 12). The fair value of these securities was$38.7 million and $31.8 million at December 31,2012 and 2011, respectively.5. PERFORMANCE BONDS AND GUARANTYFUND CONTRIBUTIONSThe company maintains three clearing houses: CMEClearing (a division of CME), KCBTCC andCMECE. The clearing houses clear and guarantee thesettlement of contracts traded in their respectivemarkets. At December 31, 2012, the operations ofKCBTCC were separate from CME, but KCBTCCwill be fully integrated with CME Clearing during2013. In their guarantor roles, the clearing houseshave precisely equal and offsetting claims to andfrom clearing firms on opposite sides of eachcontract, standing as an intermediary on everycontract cleared. Clearing firm positions in theUnited States are held according to Commodity andFutures Trading Commission (CFTC) regulatoryaccount segregation standards. To the extent thatfunds are not otherwise available to satisfy anobligation under the applicable contract, the clearinghouses bear counterparty credit risk in the event thatfuture market movements create conditions that couldlead to clearing firms failing to meet their obligationsto the clearing houses. The clearing houses reducethe exposure through risk management programs thatinclude initial and ongoing financial standards fordesignation as a clearing firm, performance bondrequirements and mandatory guaranty fundcontributions. Each CME and KCBTCC clearing firmis required to deposit and maintain balances in theform of cash, U.S. Government securities, certainforeign government securities, bank letters of creditor other approved investments to satisfy performancebond and guaranty fund requirements. Clearing firmsthat clear through CMECE are required to depositand maintain collateral in the form of cash, certainU.S. and foreign government securities or otherapproved investments to satisfy performance bondand guaranty fund requirements. All non-cashdeposits are marked to market and haircut on a dailybasis.In addition, the rules and regulations of CBOTrequire that collateral be provided for delivery ofphysical commodities, maintenance of capital77
  • 88. requirements and deposits on pending arbitrationmatters. To satisfy these requirements, clearing firmsthat have accounts that trade certain CBOT productshave deposited cash, U.S. Treasury securities andletters of credit.The clearing houses mark-to-market open positions atleast twice a day, and require payment from clearingfirms whose positions have lost value and makepayments to clearing firms whose positions havegained value. For select cleared-only markets,positions are marked-to-market once daily, with thecapability to mark-to-market more frequently asmarket conditions warrant.Under the extremely unlikely scenario ofsimultaneous default by every clearing firm who hasopen positions with unrealized losses, the maximumexposure related to positions other than over-the-counter credit default and interest rate swap contractswould be one half day of changes in fair value of allopen positions, before considering the clearinghouses’ ability to access defaulting clearing firms’collateral deposits. For CME’s cleared over-the-counter credit default swap and interest rate swapcontracts, the maximum exposure related to CME’sguarantee would be one full day of changes in fairvalue of all open positions, before consideringCME’s ability to access defaulting clearing firms’collateral. During 2012, the clearing housestransferred an average of approximately $2.4 billion aday through their clearing systems for settlementfrom clearing firms whose positions had lost value toclearing firms whose positions had gained value. Theclearing houses reduce the guarantee exposurethrough initial and maintenance performance bondrequirements and mandatory guaranty fundcontributions. The company believes that theguarantee liability is immaterial and therefore has notrecorded any liability at December 31, 2012.Cash performance bonds and guaranty fundcontributions are included in the consolidated balancesheets, and these balances may fluctuate significantlyover time due to investment choices available toclearing firms and changes in the amount ofcontributions required. Securities are not reflected inthe consolidated financial statements and the clearinghouses do not earn any interest on these deposits.CME ClearingClearing firms, at their option, may instruct CME todeposit the cash held by CME into one of the IEFprograms. The total principal in the IEF programswas $13.3 billion at December 31, 2012 and $15.4billion at December 31, 2011. The guaranty fundcontributions held in one of the IEF programs may beused as collateral for CME’s $5.0 billion multi-currency line of credit. The consolidated statementsof income reflect management fees earned under theIEF programs of $10.6 million, $11.2 million and$10.0 million during 2012, 2011 and 2010,respectively. These fees are included in otherrevenues.CME and The Options Clearing Corporation (OCC)have a cross-margin arrangement, whereby a clearingfirm may maintain a cross-margin account in which aCME clearing firm’s positions in certain equity indexfutures and options are combined with certainpositions cleared by OCC for purposes of calculatingperformance bond requirements. The performancebond deposits are held jointly by CME and OCC(note 15). Cross-margin cash, securities and letters ofcredit jointly held with OCC under the cross-marginagreement are reflected at 50% of the total, or CME’sproportionate share per that agreement. In addition,CME has cross-margin agreements with FixedIncome Clearing Corporation (FICC) whereby theclearing firms’ offsetting positions with CME andFICC are subject to reduced performance bondrequirements. Clearing firms maintain separateperformance bond deposits with each clearing house,but depending on the net offsetting positions betweenCME and FICC, each clearing house may reduce thatfirm’s performance bond requirements.Each CME clearing firm for futures and options isrequired to deposit and maintain specified guarantyfund contributions in the form of cash or approvedsecurities. In the event that performance bonds,guaranty fund contributions, and other assets requiredto support clearing membership of a defaulting CMEclearing firm are inadequate to fulfill that clearingfirm’s outstanding financial obligation, the baseguaranty fund for contracts other than over-the-counter credit default and interest rate swaps isavailable to cover potential losses after first utilizing$100.0 million of corporate contributions designatedby CME to be used in the event of a default of aclearing firm for the base guaranty fund.78
  • 89. CME maintains a separate guaranty fund to supportthe clearing firms that clear over-the-counter creditdefault swap products. Additionally, CME maintainsa separate guaranty fund to support the clearing firmsthat clear over-the-counter interest rate swapproducts. The funds for over-the-counter creditdefault and interest rate swaps are independent of thebase guaranty fund and are isolated to clearing firmsfor products in the respective asset class. Eachclearing firm for cleared over-the-counter creditdefault swaps and cleared over-the-counter interestrate swaps is required to deposit and maintainspecified guaranty fund contributions in the form ofcash or approved securities. In the event thatperformance bonds, guaranty fund contributions andother assets required to support clearing membershipof a defaulting clearing firm for cleared over-the-counter credit default swap contracts are inadequateto fulfill that clearing firm’s outstanding financialobligation, the credit default swaps contractsguaranty fund is available to cover potential lossesafter first utilizing corporate contributions designatedby CME to be used in the event of default of acleared over-the-counter credit default swap clearingfirm, which is equal to the greater of $50.0 millionand 5% of the credit default swap guaranty fund, upto a maximum of $100.0 million. In the event thatperformance bonds, guaranty fund contributions andother assets required to support clearing membershipof a defaulting clearing firm for cleared over-the-counter interest rate swap contracts are inadequate tofulfill that clearing firm’s outstanding financialobligation, the interest rate swaps contracts guarantyfund is available to cover potential losses after firstutilizing $100.0 million of corporate contributionsdesignated by CME to be used in the event of adefault of a cleared over-the-counter interest rateswap clearing firm.CME maintains a 364-day multi-currency line ofcredit with a consortium of domestic andinternational banks to be used in certain situations byCME Clearing. CME may use the proceeds toprovide temporary liquidity in the unlikely event of aclearing firm default, in the event of a liquidityconstraint or default by a depositary (custodian of thecollateral), or in the event of a temporary disruptionwith the domestic payments system that would delaypayment of settlement variation between CME andits clearing firms. Clearing firm guaranty fundcontributions received in the form of U.S. Treasurysecurities, U.S. government agency securities ormoney market mutual funds as well as theperformance bond assets of a defaulting firm can beused to collateralize the facility. The line of creditprovides for borrowings of up to $5.0 billion. AtDecember 31, 2012, guaranty fund contributionsavailable for CME clearing firms was $4.8 billion.CME has the option to request an increase in the linefrom $5.0 billion to $7.0 billion, subject to theapproval of participating banks. In addition to the364-day fully secured, committed multi-currency lineof credit, the company also has the option to use the$1.8 billion multi-currency revolving senior creditfacility to provide liquidity for the clearing house inthe unlikely event of default.KCBTCCAt December 31, 2012, the company maintained aseparate guaranty fund for KCBTCC clearing firms.This guaranty fund was incorporated into CME’sguaranty fund in February 2013.CMECEThe company maintains a guaranty fund for CMECEover-the-counter commodity clearing firms. In theevent that a defaulting CMECE clearing firm’sperformance bonds are inadequate to fulfill itsoutstanding financial obligation, the company woulduse guaranty fund contributions of $60.0 million ofCMECE funds for commodity clearing firms. As ofDecember 31, 2012, guaranty fund contributionswere contributed by CMECE and not by the clearingfirms. Commodity clearing firms will begincontributing to the commodity guaranty fund in 2013.Once the CMECE clearing firms contribute to theguaranty funds, CMECE will still use at least $20.0million of CMECE funds in addition to thecommodity clearing firms’ guaranty fundcontributions in the event of a default.Beginning in 2013, the company will also maintain aguaranty fund for CMECE over-the-counter interestrate swap clearing firms. CMECE will begin offeringto clear interest rate swap contracts in the first quarterof 2013. In the unlikely event of default by aCMECE clearing firm, the company will first applyassets of the defaulting clearing firm to satisfy itspayment obligations. If the default remainsunsatisfied, the company will apply guaranty fundcontributions of $52.5 million for interest rate swapclearing firms that will be contributed by CMECE79
  • 90. instead of by the clearing firms. In the future, theinterest rate swap clearing firms may be asked tocontribute to the interest rate swap guaranty fund.Once the CMECE clearing firms contribute to theguaranty fund, the company would still use at least$52.5 million of CMECE funds in the event of adefault of an interest rate swap clearing firm.CME and KCBTCC are required under theCommodity Exchange Act in the United States tosegregate cash and securities deposited by clearingfirms on behalf of their customers. In addition, CMEand KCBTCC require segregation of all fundsdeposited by its clearing firms from operating funds.CMECE holds cash and securities deposited byclearing firms in segregated accounts, and maintainsdistinct accounts for its own operating funds.Cash and non-cash deposits held as performance bonds and guaranty fund contributions at fair value atDecember 31 were as follows:2012 2011(in millions) CashNon-CashDepositsandIEF Funds CashNon-CashDepositsandIEF FundsPerformance bonds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,647.1 $77,414.1 $8,103.4 $80,250.7Guaranty fund contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 925.4 4,419.0 1,156.3 3,869.8Cross-margin arrangements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — 83.1 60.0 202.9Performance collateral for delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.3 0.5 14.2 12.0Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,584.8 $81,916.7 $9,333.9 $84,335.4Performance bonds and guaranty fund contributionsinclude collateral for clearing firms for all threeclearing houses. Cross-margin arrangements includecollateral for the cross-margin accounts with OCCand FICC. The performance bond collateral fordelivery includes deposits to meet CBOT deliveryrequirements.Cash performance bonds may include intradaysettlement, if any, that is owed to the clearing firmsand paid the following business day. The balance ofintraday settlements was $175.9 million atDecember 31, 2012 and $120.9 million atDecember 31, 2011. Intraday settlements may beinvested on an overnight basis and are offset by anequal liability owed to clearing firms.In addition to cash, securities and other non-cashdeposits, irrevocable letters of credit may be used asperformance bond deposits for clearing firms. AtDecember 31, these letters of credit, which are notincluded in the accompanying consolidated balancesheets, were as follows:(in millions) 2012 2011Performance bonds . . . . . . . . . $4,208.3 $4,214.8Performance collateral fordelivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,019.7 1,449.3Total Letters of Credit . . . . . . . $5,228.0 $5,664.1All cash, securities and letters of credit posted asperformance bonds are only available to meet thefinancial obligations of that clearing firm to theclearing houses.80
  • 91. 6. PROPERTYA summary of the property accounts at December 31 is presented below:(in millions) 2012 2011Estimated UsefulLifeLand and land improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 20.1 $ 65.6 10 - 20 years (1)Building and building improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512.6 531.7 3 - 39 yearsLeasehold improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219.4 214.6 3 - 24 yearsFurniture, fixtures and equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342.8 328.3 2 - 7 yearsSoftware and software development costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269.5 258.0 2 - 4 yearsTotal property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,364.4 1,398.2Less accumulated depreciation and amortization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (640.4) (576.3)Property, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 724.0 $ 821.9(1) Estimated useful life applies only to land improvements.In April 2012, CME Group sold two buildings inChicago for $151.5 million resulting in a gain of$20.3 million. At the time of the sale, the companyleased back a portion of the property. As a result ofthe leaseback, the company is required to recognizethe gain as a reduction to operating expenses over the15 year term of the lease.7. INTANGIBLE ASSETS AND GOODWILLIntangible assets consisted of the following at December 31:2012 2011(in millions)AssignedValueAccumulatedAmortizationNet BookValueAssignedValueAccumulatedAmortizationNet BookValueAmortizable Intangible Assets:Clearing firm, market data and othercustomer relationships . . . . . . . . . . $2,838.8 $(467.4) $ 2,371.4 $3,071.9 $(400.4) $ 2,671.5Lease-related intangibles . . . . . . . . . . 25.4 (8.2) 17.2 83.2 (45.4) 37.8Technology-related intellectualproperty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29.4 (14.4) 15.0 56.2 (28.4) 27.8Other(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.2 (0.1) 0.1 11.6 (10.6) 1.02,893.8 (490.1) 2,403.7 3,222.9 (484.8) 2,738.1Foreign currency translationadjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — — — (8.8) 5.9 (2.9)Total amortizable intangible assets . . . $2,893.8 $(490.1) 2,403.7 $3,214.1 $(478.9) 2,735.2Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets:Trade names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450.0 578.0Foreign currency translationadjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — (0.4)Total intangible assets—other, net . . . $ 2,853.7 $ 3,312.8Trading products (2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,175.3 $17,040.5(1) At December 31, 2012, other amortizable intangible assets consisted of a definite-lived trade name. AtDecember 31, 2011, other amortizable intangible assets consisted of service and market maker agreementsand a definite-lived trade name.81
  • 92. (2) Trading products represent futures and options products acquired in our business combinations with CBOTHoldings, Inc. (CBOT Holdings), KCBT and NYMEX Holdings, Inc. (NYMEX Holdings). Clearing andtransaction fees revenues are generated through the trading of these products. These trading products, mostof which have traded for decades, require authorization from the CFTC. Product authorizations from theCFTC have no term limits.As part of its sale of the two buildings in Chicago inApril 2012, the company sold the rights to leaseagreements with tenants occupying space within thebuildings. The lease agreements, which are includedin lease-related intangibles, had a net book value of$14.4 million on the date of sale. In June 2012, thecompany contributed the DJI asset group to S&P/DJI.Contributed intangible assets with an aggregate netbook value of $336.3 million included rights tocustomer agreements, technology-related intellectualproperty and trade names. In addition, the companysold CMA-related intangible assets with a net bookvalue of $9.4 million.In July 2012, the company recognized $17.0 millionof intangible assets related to the acquisition of Pivot,Inc., including customer relationships andtechnology-related intellectual property. Inconnection with the acquisition of KCBT inNovember 2012, the company acquired tradingproducts, which are classified as indefinite-livedintangible assets, in the amount of $134.8 million.In the second quarter of 2011, the company sold itsrights in certain Index Services customerrelationships for $18.0 million. The net book value ofthese assets at the time of the sale was $8.2 million.The estimated useful lives for the amortizableintangible assets as of December 31, 2012 are asfollows:Clearing firm, market data andother customerrelationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 30 yearsLease-related intangibleassets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 - 24.5 yearsTechnology-related intellectualproperty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 yearsOther . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 yearsTotal amortization expense for intangible assets was$116.2 million, $132.0 million and $128.1 million forthe years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010,respectively. As of December 31, 2012, the futureestimated amortization expense related toamortizable intangible assets is expected to be asfollows:(in millions)2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 102.82014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101.52015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101.32016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97.92017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97.3Thereafter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,902.9Goodwill activity consisted of the following for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011:(in millions)Balance atDecember 31, 2011BusinessCombinations Divestitures Other ActivityBalance atDecember 31, 2012CBOT Holdings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,035.7 $ — $ — $— $5,035.7NYMEX Holdings . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,462.2 — — — 2,462.2Index Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434.5 — (434.5) — —Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51.6 46.3 (28.9) — 69.0Total Goodwill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,984.0 $46.3 $(463.4) $— $7,566.982
  • 93. (in millions)Balance atDecember 31, 2010BusinessCombinations Divestitures Other Activity(3)Balance atDecember 31, 2011CBOT Holdings . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,035.7 $— $— $— $5,035.7NYMEX Holdings . . . . . . . . . . . 2,462.3 — — (0.1) 2,462.2Index Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435.6 — — (1.1) 434.5Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.0 — — 1.6 51.6Total Goodwill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,983.6 $— $— $ 0.4 $7,984.0(3) Other activity includes adjustments to restructuring costs and tax contingencies, the recognition of excesstax benefits upon exercise of stock options and foreign currency translation adjustments.The company recognized goodwill in connectionwith the acquisitions of KCBT and Pivot, Inc. Inconjunction with the formation of S&P/DJI, thecompany divested the goodwill allocated to the IndexServices and CMA reporting units.8. LONG-TERM INVESTMENTSThe company maintains various long-terminvestments as described below. The investments arerecorded in other assets in the consolidated balancesheets.BM&FBOVESPA S.A. The company owns anapproximate 5% interest in BM&FBOVESPA S. A.(BM&FBOVESPA). BM&FBOVESPA is a stockand derivatives exchange in Brazil. The companycould not sell its shares in BM&FBOVESPA untilFebruary 2012. As a result, BM&FBOVESPA stockwas carried at cost until within twelve months of therestriction lapsing, after which time the companybegan accounting for the stock as an available-for-sale security. The fair value and cost basis of theinvestment was $690.6 million and $262.9 million,respectively, at December 31, 2012. The companyand BM&FBOVESPA have entered into severalagreements including co-location, licensing, orderrouting and technology development arrangements.Bolsa Mexicana de Valores, S.A.B de C.V. InMarch 2010, the company acquired an approximate2% interest in Bolsa Mexicana de Valores, S.A.B. deC.V. (Bolsa Mexicana), a financial exchangeoperator in Mexico. The company accounts for itsinvestment in Bolsa Mexicana stock as an available-for-sale security. The fair value and cost basis of thecompany’s investment in Bolsa Mexicana atDecember 31, 2012 was $29.3 million and $17.3million, respectively. The company and BolsaMexicana maintain a strategic partnership thatincludes an order routing agreement for derivativeproducts.Bursa Malaysia Derivatives Berhad. The companyowns a 25% interest in Bursa Malaysia DerivativesBerhad (Bursa Derivatives), and accounts for itsinvestment in Bursa Derivatives using the equitymethod of accounting. The company may not sell itsshares in Bursa Derivatives until November 2013.The company’s investment in Bursa Derivatives was$28.1 million at December 31, 2012. The companyand Bursa Derivatives have entered into severalagreements including agreements to providelicensing, order routing and trade matching services.DME Holdings Limited. The company owns anapproximate 50% interest in DME Holdings Limited(DME Holdings), and accounts for its investment inDME Holdings using the equity method ofaccounting. The company’s investment in DMEHoldings was $20.2 million at December 31, 2012. Inaddition, in December 2011, the company provided a$3.0 million loan to Dubai Mercantile ExchangeLimited, payable on demand. The company and DMEHoldings maintain an agreement for DubaiMercantile Exchange (DME) futures contracts to beexclusively traded on the CME Globex platform.S&P/DJI Indices LLC. The company owns anapproximate 24% interest in S&P/DJI and accountsfor its investment in S&P/DJI using the equitymethod of accounting. The company’s investment inS&P/DJI was $942.4 million at December 31, 2012.The company has long-term exclusive licensingagreements with S&P/DJI to list products based onthe Standard & Poor’s Indices and on Dow JonesIndices.83
  • 94. 9. DEBTShort-term debt consisted of the following atDecember 31:(in millions) 2012 2011$750.0 million fixed rate notes dueAugust 2013, stated rate of5.40% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $749.7 $—Total short-term debt . . . . . . . . . . . . $749.7 $—Long-term debt consisted of the following atDecember 31:(in millions) 2012 2011$750.0 million fixed rate notesdue August 2013, stated rateof 5.40% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ — $ 749.2$750.0 million fixed rate notesdue February 2014, statedrate of 5.75% . . . . . . . . . . . . 749.0 748.0$612.5 million fixed rate notesdue March 2018, stated rateof 4.40%(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610.1 609.6$750.0 million fixed rate notesdue September 2022, statedrate of 3.00% (2) . . . . . . . . . . $ 747.7 —Total long-term debt . . . . . . . . $2,106.8 $2,106.8(1) In February 2010, the company entered into aforward-starting interest rate swap agreementthat modified the interest obligation associatedwith these notes so that the interest payable onthe notes effectively became fixed at a rate of4.46%.(2) In August 2012, the company entered into aforward-starting interest rate swap agreementthat modified the interest obligation associatedwith these notes so that the interest payable onthe notes effectively became fixed at a rate of3.32%.The company maintains a commercial paper programunder its senior credit facility. There was nocommercial paper outstanding at December 31, 2012or 2011. As of December 31, 2012, the most recentcommercial paper issuance was in March 2011.Commercial paper notes with an aggregate par valueof $1.0 billion and maturities ranging from 1 to 33days were issued during 2011. During 2011, theweighted average balance, at par value, ofcommercial paper outstanding was $30.7 million. In2011, the maximum month-end balance forcommercial paper was $200.0 million in January.Long-term debt maturities, at par value, were asfollows as of December 31, 2012:(in millions)2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ —2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 750.02015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . —2016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . —2017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . —Thereafter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,362.5The fair values of the fixed rate notes due 2013, 2014and 2022 were estimated using quoted market pricesand are considered level 2 liabilities under theclassification hierarchy for fair value measurements.The fair value of the fixed rate notes due 2018, whichis considered a level 3 liability, was derived using astandard valuation model with market-basedobservable inputs including U.S. Treasury yields andinterest rate spreads. For further information on thethree-level classification hierarchy of fair valuemeasurements, see note 19. At December 31, 2012,the fair values of the fixed rate notes by maturity datewere as follows:(in millions) Fair Value$750.0 million fixed rate notes dueAugust 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $771.3$750.0 million fixed rate notes dueFebruary 2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 792.1$612.5 million fixed rate notes due March2018 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 684.0$750.0 million fixed rate notes dueSeptember 2022 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 767.110. DERIVATIVE INVESTMENTSThe company mitigates certain financial exposures tointerest rate risk through the use of derivativefinancial instruments as part of its risk managementprogram. The company does not use derivativeinstruments for trading purposes. All derivatives havebeen designated as cash flow hedges.In August 2012, the company entered into twoforward-starting interest rate swap contracts, with an84
  • 95. aggregate notional value of $1.5 billion, to hedge therisk of changes in underlying benchmark interestrates associated with the expected issuances of fixed-rate debt. One of these swap contracts was settled inconjunction with the issuance of fixed-rate debt inSeptember 2012. The hedge was considered highlyeffective. The effective portion is included inaccumulated other comprehensive income and will beamortized over the term of the debt.The fair value and location of outstanding derivativeinstruments in the consolidated balance sheet as ofDecember 31, 2012 were as follows.(in millions) Balance Sheet Location Fair ValueInterest ratecontract . . . . . . . Other liabilities $1.0There were no derivative instruments outstanding atDecember 31, 2011.The effects of derivative instruments on the consolidated statements of income as well as accumulated othercomprehensive income (OCI) within the consolidated statements of comprehensive income and consolidatedstatements of equity for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 were as follows. The effects are shownbefore the tax impact.Gains (Losses)Recognized in OCI(Effective Portion)Gains (Losses) Reclassified fromAccumulated OCI(Effective Portion)Gains (Losses)Recognized in Income(Ineffective Portion)(in millions) 2012 2011 Location 2012 2011 Location 2012 2011Interest ratecontracts . . . . . . . . . . $(25.3) $—Interest and otherborrowing costs $(1.1) $(0.8)Gains (losses) onderivative investments $(0.1) $(0.1)At December 31, 2012, the company expects toreclassify $2.8 million of net gains (losses) onderivative instruments from accumulated othercomprehensive income to net income as additionalinterest expense during the next twelve months.11. INCOME TAXESIncome before income taxes and the income taxprovision consisted of the following for the yearsended December 31. The company is subject toregulation under a wide variety of U.S., federal, stateand foreign tax laws and regulations.(in millions) 2012 2011 2010Income beforeincome taxes:Domestic . . . . . . $1,703.5 $1,952.6 $1,733.0Foreign . . . . . . . (10.1) (16.1) (11.1)Total . . . . . . . . . $1,693.4 $1,936.5 $1,721.9Income taxprovision:Current:Federal . . . . . . . . $ 585.2 $ 644.0 $ 601.6State . . . . . . . . . . 117.6 135.4 148.9Foreign . . . . . . . 1.7 1.4 (3.0)Total . . . . . . . . . 704.5 780.8 747.5(in millions) 2012 2011 2010Deferred:Federal . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.3 300.2 (53.9)State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37.0 (954.1) 76.1Foreign . . . . . . . . . . . (5.1) (4.8) 0.1Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82.2 (658.7) 22.3Total Income TaxProvision . . . . . . . . . . $786.7 $ 122.1 $769.8Reconciliation of the statutory U.S. federal incometax rate to the effective tax rate is as follows:2012 2011 2010Statutory U.S. federal taxrate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35.0% 35.0% 35.0%State taxes, net of federalbenefit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.8 6.3 5.8Increase (decrease) indomestic valuationallowance . . . . . . . . . . . . . — (2.5) (0.1)Impact of revised state andlocal apportionmentestimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 (33.4) 3.0Deferred taxes associatedwith McGraw venture andCMA sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3 — —Other, net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (0.6) 0.9 1.0Effective Tax Rate . . . . . . . . 46.5% 6.3% 44.7%85
  • 96. In 2012, the effective tax rate was higher than thestatutory tax rate because of a $106.8 millionincrease to the income tax provision due to theestablishment of deferred income tax liabilitiesassociated with the McGraw venture. In 2011, theeffective tax rate was lower than the statutory tax ratebecause of a change in state tax apportionment whichresulted in a reduction in the company’s income taxprovision of $646.0 million largely due to arevaluation of its existing deferred income taxliabilities. Also in 2011, the company began markingto market its investment in BM&FBOVESPA whichresulted in a $48.8 million reduction in valuationallowances on other unrealized capital lossespreviously reserved. In 2010, the effective tax ratewas higher than the statutory tax rate due to a $51.2million charge to record the impact of the company’snew combined state and local tax rate on its existingdeferred income tax liabilities.At December 31, deferred income tax assets(liabilities) consisted of the following:(in millions) 2012 2011Net Current Deferred Income TaxAssets:Unrealized loss on securities . . . $ 3.4 $ 3.5Stock-based compensation . . . . 12.9 12.9Accrued expenses and other . . . 17.8 15.6Net Current Deferred Income TaxAssets $ 34.1 $ 32.0Net Non-Current Deferred IncomeTax Assets:Domestic unrealized loss oninvestment inBM&FBOVESPA . . . . . . . . . $ — $ 37.8Foreign losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22.7 44.6Domestic losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.2 —Stock-based compensation . . . . 47.9 40.0Deferred compensation . . . . . . . 27.5 20.3Unrealized losses onsecurities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29.7 46.4Accrued expenses and other . . . 49.2 46.4Subtotal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187.2 235.5Valuation allowance . . . . . . . . . (24.8) (43.2)Total non-current deferredincome tax assets . . . . . . . . . . 162.4 192.3(in millions) 2012 2011Non-Current DeferredIncome Tax Liabilities:Domestic unrealized gainon investment inBM&FBOVESPA . . . . (21.6) —Purchased intangibleassets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (7,523.6) (7,342.0)Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (30.5) (77.1)Total non-current deferredincome tax liabilities . . . (7,575.7) (7,419.1)Net Non-Current DeferredIncome Tax Liabilities . . . . . $(7,413.3) $(7,226.8)A valuation allowance is recorded when it is more-likely-than-not that some portion or all of thedeferred income tax assets may not be realized. Theultimate realization of the deferred income tax assetsdepends on the ability to generate sufficient taxableincome of the appropriate character in the future andin the appropriate taxing jurisdictions.At December 31, 2012 and 2011, the company haddomestic and foreign income tax loss carry forwardsof $127.5 million and $110.8 million, respectively.These amounts primarily related to losses from theacquisition of Swapstream Limited and its affiliates,the acquisition of Pivot, Inc., and losses incurred inthe operation of various foreign entities. AtDecember 31, 2012 and 2011, the companydetermined that it was not more-likely-than-not thatdeferred income tax assets related to the acquisitionof Swapstream Limited and its affiliates and otherdeferred income tax assets created from the start-upof various foreign operations will be fully realized.As a result, valuation allowances of $24.8 millionand $27.6 million were recorded at December 31,2012 and 2011. The reduction of the valuationallowance from 2011 to 2012 was primarily related toa reduced deferred income tax rate resulting from achange in United Kingdom corporate income taxrates.At December 31, 2011, the company had a long-termdeferred income tax asset from foreign losses of$15.6 million related to Brazilian taxes primarily as aresult of unrealized capital losses incurred in Brazilrelated to the company’s investment inBM&FBOVESPA. At December 31, 2011, valuationallowances of $15.6 million related to this deferred86
  • 97. tax asset. At December 31, 2011, the companydetermined that it was more-likely-than-not that itwill not be able to realize this deferred income taxasset. As a result of changes in the stock price andfavorable foreign currency fluctuations, the companyno longer had a deferred tax asset related to itsinvestment in BM&FBOVESPA at December 31,2012.The following is a summary of the company’sunrecognized tax benefits:(in millions) 2012 2011 2010Gross unrecognized taxbenefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37.7 $36.8 $56.4Unrecognized tax benefits,net of tax impacts in otherjurisdictions . . . . . . . . . . . 24.5 24.9 43.0Unrecognized interest andpenalties related touncertain tax positions . . . 20.1 17.1 15.5Interest and penaltiesrecognized in theconsolidated statements ofincome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 1.6 5.4The company believes it is reasonably possible thatwithin the next twelve months, unrecognizeddomestic tax benefits will not change by a significantamount.A reconciliation of the beginning and ending amountof unrecognized tax benefits is as follows:(in millions) 2012 2011 2010Balance at January 1 . . . . . . $36.8 $ 56.4 $42.6Additions based on taxpositions related tothe current year . . . . 5.3 6.0 10.4Additions for taxpositions of prioryears . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2 0.6 4.1Reductions for taxpositions of prioryears . . . . . . . . . . . . (2.0) (22.9) (0.5)Reductions resultingfrom the lapse ofstatutes oflimitations . . . . . . . . (2.2) — (0.2)Settlements with taxingauthorities . . . . . . . . (3.4) (3.3) —Balance at December 31 . . . $37.7 $ 36.8 $56.4The company is subject to U.S. federal income tax aswell as income taxes in Illinois and multiple otherstate, local and foreign jurisdictions. As ofDecember 31, 2012, substantially all federal and stateincome tax matters had been concluded through 2007and 2004, respectively.12. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLANSPension Plans. CME maintains a non-contributorydefined benefit cash balance pension plan for eligibleemployees. CME’s plan provides for a contributionto the cash balance account based on age andearnings and includes salary and cash bonuses in thedefinition of earnings. Employees who havecompleted a continuous 12-month period ofemployment and have reached the age of 21 areeligible to participate. Participant cash balanceaccounts receive an interest credit equal to the greaterof the one-year constant maturity yield for U.S.Treasury notes or 4.0%. Participants become vestedin their accounts after three years of service. Themeasurement date used for the plan is December 31.The following is a summary of the change inprojected benefit obligation:(in millions) 2012 2011Balance at January 1 . . . . . . . . . . . $148.8 $118.2Service cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16.0 13.5Interest cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.9 7.4Actuarial (gain) loss . . . . . . . 18.5 14.4Benefits paid . . . . . . . . . . . . . (9.6) (4.7)Balance at December 31 . . . . . . . . $181.6 $148.8The aggregate accumulated benefit obligation was$158.8 million and $130.3 million at December 31,2012 and 2011, respectively.The following is a summary of the change in fairvalue of plan assets:(in millions) 2012 2011 2010Balance at January 1 . . . . $149.1 $121.3 $107.7Actual return onplan assets . . . . . . 16.4 4.5 12.8Employercontributions . . . . 28.0 28.0 5.2Benefits paid . . . . . . (9.6) (4.7) (4.4)Balance atDecember 31 . . . . . . . $183.9 $149.1 $121.387
  • 98. The plan assets are classified into a fair valuehierarchy in their entirety based on the lowest levelof input that is significant to each asset or liability’sfair value measurement. Valuation techniques forlevel 2 assets use significant observable inputs suchas quoted prices for similar assets, quoted marketprices in inactive markets and other inputs that areobservable or can be supported by observable marketdata. The fair value of each major category of planassets as of December 31 is indicated below.(in millions) 2012 2011Level 2:Money market funds . . . . . . . $ 29.4 $ 29.3Mutual funds: . . . . . . . . . . . .U.S. equity . . . . . . . . . . . 47.4 35.3Foreign equity . . . . . . . . 49.1 33.3Fixed income . . . . . . . . . 50.8 45.3Commodity . . . . . . . . . . 7.2 5.9Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $183.9 $149.1At December 31, 2012 and 2011, the fair value ofpension plan assets exceeded the projected benefitobligation by $2.3 million and $0.3 million,respectively. This excess was recorded as a non-current pension asset.CME’s funding goal is to have its pension plan 100%funded at each year-end on a projected benefitobligation basis, while also satisfying any minimumrequired contribution and obtaining the maximum taxdeduction. Year-end 2012 assumptions have beenused to project the assets and liabilities fromDecember 31, 2012 to December 31, 2013. The resultof this projection is that estimated liabilities wouldexceed the fair value of the plan assets atDecember 31, 2013 by approximately $19.9 million.Accordingly, it is estimated that a $19.9 millioncontribution in 2013 will allow the company to meetits funding goal.The components of net pension expense and the assumptions used to determine the end-of-year projected benefitobligation and net pension expense in aggregate are indicated below:(in millions) 2012 2011 2010Components of Net Pension Expense:Service cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 16.0 $13.5 $11.6Interest cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.9 7.4 6.5Expected return on plan assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (11.0) (9.0) (8.3)Recognized net actuarial loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 1.5 2.2Net Pension Expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 15.4 $13.4 $12.0Assumptions Used to Determine End-of-Year Benefit Obligation:Discount rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.10% 5.00% 5.70%Rate of compensation increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.00 5.00 5.00Cash balance interest crediting rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.00 4.00 4.00Assumptions Used to Determine Net Pension Expense:Discount rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.00% 5.70% 5.70%Rate of compensation increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.00 5.00 5.00Expected return on plan assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.75 7.75 8.00Interest crediting rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.00 4.00 4.00The discount rate for the plan was determined basedon the market value of a theoretical settlement bondportfolio. This portfolio consisted of U.S. dollardenominated Aa-rated corporate bonds across the fullmaturity spectrum. A single equivalent discount ratewas determined to align the present value of therequired cash flow with that settlement value. Theresulting discount rate was reflective of both thecurrent interest rate environment and the plan’sdistinct liability characteristics.The basis for determining the expected rate of returnon plan assets for the plan is comprised of threecomponents: historical returns, industry peers andforecasted return. The plan’s total return is expectedto equal the composite performance of the securitymarkets over the long term. The security markets arerepresented by the returns on various domestic andinternational stock, bond and commodity indexes.These returns are weighted according to theallocation of plan assets to each market and measuredindividually.88
  • 99. The overall objective of the plan is to achieverequired long-term rates of return in order to meetfuture benefit payments. The component of theinvestment policy for the plan that has the mostsignificant impact on returns is the asset mix. Theasset mix has a minimum and maximum rangedepending on asset class. The plan assets arediversified to minimize the risk of large losses by anyone or more individual assets. Such diversification isaccomplished, in part, through the selection of assetmix and investment management. The assetallocation for the plan, by asset category, atDecember 31 was as follows:2012 2011Fixed income . . . . . . . . . . 27.6% 30.4%U.S. equity . . . . . . . . . . . 25.8 23.6Foreign equity . . . . . . . . . 26.7 22.3Money market funds . . . . 16.0 19.7Commodity . . . . . . . . . . . 3.9 4.0The range of target allocation percentages for 2013 isas follows:Minimum MaximumFixed income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33.0% 45.0%U.S. equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.5 35.0Foreign equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.5 35.0Commodity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 8.0At times, the company may determine that it isnecessary to place some assets in cash equivalentinvestments in order to pay expected plan liabilities.Given this, the actual asset allocation for the planmay not fall within the target allocation ranges fromtime to time.According to the plan’s investment policy, the plan isnot allowed to invest in securities that compromiseindependence, short sales of securities directly ownedby the plan, securities purchased on margin or otheruses of borrowed funds, derivatives not used forhedging purposes, restricted stock or illiquidsecurities or any other transaction prohibited byemployment laws. If the plan directly invests inshort-term and long-term debt obligations, theinvestments are limited to obligations rated at thehighest rating category by Standard & Poor’s (S&P)or Moody’s.The balance and activity of the prior service costsand actuarial losses, which are included in othercomprehensive income (loss), for 2012 are asfollows:(in millions)PriorService CostsActuarialLossBalance at January 1 . . . . . . $ 0.2 $46.3Unrecognized loss . . . . — 13.0Recognized as acomponent of netpension expense . . . — (2.5)Balance at December 31 . . . $ 0.2 $56.8The company expects to amortize $4.0 million ofactuarial loss from accumulated other comprehensiveincome (loss) into net periodic benefit costs in 2013.At December 31, 2012, anticipated benefit paymentsfrom the plan in future years are as follows:(in millions)2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11.52014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.72015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.32016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.72017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.62018-2022 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96.3Savings Plans. CME maintains a definedcontribution savings plan pursuant to Section 401(k)of the Internal Revenue Code, whereby all U.S.employees are participants and have the option tocontribute to this plan. CME matches employeecontributions up to 3% of the employee’s base salaryand may make additional discretionary contributions.In addition to the plan for U.S. employees, thecompany maintains defined contribution savingsplans for employees in international locations.Aggregate expense for all of the defined contributionsavings plans amounted to $8.9 million, $8.6 millionand $6.3 million in 2012, 2011 and 2010,respectively.CME Non-Qualified Plans. CME maintains non-qualified plans, under which participants may makeassumed investment choices with respect to amountscontributed on their behalf. Although not required to89
  • 100. do so, CME invests such contributions in assets thatmirror the assumed investment choices. The balancesin these plans are subject to the claims of generalcreditors of the exchange and totaled $38.7 millionand $31.8 million at December 31, 2012 and 2011respectively. Although the value of the plans isrecorded as an asset in marketable securities in theconsolidated balance sheets, there is an equal andoffsetting liability. The investment results of theseplans have no impact on net income as theinvestment results are recorded in equal amounts toboth investment income and compensation andbenefits expense.Supplemental Savings Plan. CME maintains asupplemental plan to provide benefits foremployees who have been impacted by statutorylimits under the provisions of the qualifiedpension and savings plan. Employees in thisplan are subject to the vesting requirements ofthe underlying qualified plans.Deferred Compensation Plan. A deferredcompensation plan is maintained by CME,under which eligible officers and members ofthe board of directors may contribute apercentage of their compensation and deferincome taxes thereon until the time ofdistribution.COMEX Members’ Retirement Plan and Benefits.COMEX maintains a retirement and benefit planunder the COMEX Members’ Recognition andRetention Plan (MRRP). This plan provides benefitsto certain members of the COMEX division based onlong-term membership, and participation is limited toindividuals who were COMEX division membersprior to NYMEX’s acquisition of COMEX in 1994.No new participants were permitted into the planafter the date of this acquisition. Under the terms ofthe MRRP, the company is required to fund the planwith a minimum annual contribution of $0.8 millionuntil it is fully funded. All benefits to be paid underthe MRRP are based on reasonable actuarialassumptions which are based upon the amounts thatare available and are expected to be available to paybenefits. Total contributions to the plan were $0.8million for each of 2010 through 2012. AtDecember 31, 2012 and 2011, the obligation for theMRRP totaled $22.7 million and $21.6 million,respectively. Assets with a fair value of $18.4 millionand $17.7 million have been allocated to this plan atDecember 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively, and areincluded in marketable securities and cash and cashequivalents in the consolidated balance sheets. Thebalances in these plans are subject to the claims ofgeneral creditors of COMEX.13. COMMITMENTSOperating Leases. CME Group has entered intovarious non-cancellable operating lease agreements,with the most significant being as follows:• In April 2012, the company sold twobuildings in Chicago at 141 W. Jackson andleased back a portion of the property. Theoperating lease, which has an initial leaseterm ending on April 30, 2027, contains fourconsecutive renewal options for five years.• In January 2011, the company entered into anoperating lease for office space in London.The initial lease term, which became effectiveon January 20, 2011, terminates on March 24,2026, with an option to terminate withoutpenalty in January 2021.• In July 2008, the company renegotiated theoperating lease for its headquarters at 20South Wacker Drive in Chicago. The lease,which has an initial term ending onNovember 30, 2022, contains two consecutiverenewal options for seven and ten years and acontraction option which allows the companyto reduce its occupied space afterNovember 30, 2018. In addition, the companymay exercise a lease expansion option inDecember 2017.• In August 2006, the company entered into anoperating lease for additional office space inChicago. The initial lease term, which becameeffective on August 10, 2006, terminates onNovember 30, 2023. The lease contains two5-year renewal options beginning in 2023.At December 31, 2012, future minimum paymentsunder non-cancellable operating leases were payableas follows (in millions):Year2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 28.72014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29.12015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28.92016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28.92017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29.3Thereafter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152.9Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $297.890
  • 101. Total rental expense, including equipment rental, was$46.1 million in 2012, $41.0 million in 2011 and$35.5 million in 2010.Other Commitments. Commitments includematerial contractual purchase obligations that arenon-cancellable. Purchase obligations relate toadvertising, licensing, hardware and maintenance aswell as telecommunication services. At December 31,2012, future minimum payments due under purchaseobligations were payable as follows (in millions):Year2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.62014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.92015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.82016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.02017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5Thereafter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36.814. CONTINGENCIESLegal and Regulatory Matters. In 2008, Fifth Market,Inc. (Fifth Market) filed a complaint against CMEGroup and CME seeking a permanent injunctionagainst CME’s Globex system and unquantifiedenhanced damages for what the plaintiff alleges iswillful infringement of two U.S. patents, in additionto costs, expenses and attorneys’ fees. Beginning inMarch 2012, the case was stayed pending theoutcome of reexamination by the U.S. Patent andTrademark Office (USPTO) to determine the validityof the patents at issue. Based on its investigation todate and advice from legal counsel, the companybelieves this suit is without merit and intends todefend itself vigorously against these charges.In 2009, CME and CBOT filed a complaint againstHoward Garber seeking a declaratory judgment thatneither CME nor CBOT infringed the Garber patentand that the patent is invalid and unenforceable.Beginning in June 2011, the case was stayed pendingthe outcome of the reexamination by the USPTO todetermine the validity of the patent at issue. Based onits investigation to date and advice from legalcounsel, the company believes this suit is withoutmerit and intends to defend itself vigorously againstthese charges.In 2009, Realtime Data LLC (Realtime) filed acomplaint against CME Group and other exchangesalleging willful infringement of four patents whichwas later amended to add CBOT and NYMEX asdefendants. Subsequently, two additional lawsuitshave been filed each adding a claim for theinfringement of an additional patent. Both of theselawsuits have been consolidated with the originalaction. Realtime is seeking a permanent injunction,enhanced damages, attorneys’ fees and costs. Thecourt entered judgment in CME’s favor in September2012 based on invalidity and non-infringement.Realtime Data is expected to file its appeal brief inMarch 2013. The USPTO is conducting a parallelreview of the patents at issue. Based on itsinvestigation to date and advice from legal counsel,the company believes this suit is without merit andintends to defend itself vigorously against thesecharges.The foregoing legal matters involve allegedinfringements of intellectual property, which due totheir nature involve potential liability that isuncertain, difficult to quantify and involve a widerange of potential outcomes. The company believesthat the matters are without merit and intends todefend itself vigorously against the claims. TheUSPTO’s determination of validity of the patents inthe Fifth Market, Garber and Realtime matters mayhave an impact on the merits of the cases. The timingof the USPTO’s decisions are uncertain and will besubject to further appeal.A number of lawsuits were filed in federal court inNew York on behalf of all commodity accountholders or customers of MF Global who had notreceived a return of 100% of their funds. Thesematters have been consolidated into a single action infederal court in New York, and a consolidatedamended class action complaint was filed onNovember 5, 2012. The class action complaintalleges that CME violated the Commodity ExchangeAct (CEA), aided and abetted violations of the CEAby other defendants, and aided and abetted a breachof fiduciary duty by certain officers and directors ofMF Global. The class complaint also alleges thatCME Group aided and abetted CME’s violation ofthe CEA. The complaint does not allege the amountof damages sought, but rather seeks compensatoryand exemplary damages to be determined at trial.Based on the initial analysis of the class complaint,the company believes that it has strong legal andfactual defenses to the claims. In addition to the classcomplaint, the company is aware of two plaintiffs91
  • 102. who intend to pursue their claims individually. Giventhat these matters are in the very early stage, at thistime the company is unable to estimate thereasonably possible loss or range of reasonablypossible loss in the unlikely event it was found to beliable in these matters.In February 2013, the CFTC filed suit againstNYMEX and two former employees allegingdisclosure of confidential customer information inviolation of the CEA. Based on the initial review ofthe complaint, the company believes that it has strongfactual and legal defenses to the claim.In the normal course of business, the companydiscusses matters with its regulators raised duringregulatory examinations or otherwise subject to theirinquiry and oversight. These matters could result incensures, fines, penalties or other sanctions.Management believes the outcome of any resultingactions will not have a material impact on itsconsolidated financial position or results ofoperations. However, the company is unable topredict the outcome or the timing of the ultimateresolution of these matters, or the potential fines,penalties or injunctive or other equitable relief, ifany, that may result from these matters.In addition, the company is a defendant in, and haspotential for, various other legal proceedings arisingfrom its regular business activities. While theultimate results of such proceedings against thecompany cannot be predicted with certainty, thecompany believes that the resolution of any of thesematters on an individual basis will not have amaterial impact on its consolidated financial positionor results of operations. At December 31, 2012 and2011, the company had accrued $13.2 million and$12.8 million, respectively, for legal and regulatorymatters that were probable and estimable.Intellectual Property Indemnifications. Certainagreements with customers and other third partiesrelated to accessing the CME Globex platform, theCME ClearPort platform, and/or the Clearing 21platform; utilizing market data services; licensingCME SPAN software; and calculating indexes as aservice provider and licensing indexes as the basis offinancial products may contain indemnifications fromintellectual property claims that may be made againstthem as a result of their use of the applicableproducts and/or services. The potential future claimsrelating to these indemnifications cannot beestimated and, therefore, no liability has beenrecorded.15. GUARANTEESMutual Offset Agreement. CME and SingaporeExchange Limited (SGX) have a mutual offsetagreement with a current term through October 2013.The term of the agreement will automatically renewfor a one-year period unless either party providesadvance notice of their intent to terminate. CME canmaintain collateral in the form of U.S. Treasurysecurities or irrevocable letters of credit. AtDecember 31, 2012, CME was contingently liable toSGX on irrevocable letters of credit totaling $181.0million. Regardless of the collateral, CME guaranteesall cleared transactions submitted through SGX andwould initiate procedures designed to satisfy thesefinancial obligations in the event of a default, such asthe use of performance bonds and guaranty fundcontributions of the defaulting clearing firm.Cross-Margin Agreements. CME and OCC have across-margin arrangement, whereby a clearing firmof both CME and OCC may maintain a cross-marginaccount in which the clearing firm’s positions incertain CME futures and options on futures contractsare combined with certain positions cleared by OCCfor purposes of calculating performance bondrequirements. The performance bond deposits areheld jointly by CME and OCC. If a participating firmdefaults, the gain or loss on the liquidation of thefirm’s open position and the proceeds from theliquidation of the cross-margin account would beallocated 50% each to CME and OCC.A cross-margin agreement exists with CME andFixed Income Clearing Corp (FICC) whereby theclearing firms’ offsetting positions with CME aresubject to reduced margin requirements. Clearingfirms maintain separate performance bond depositswith each clearing house, but depending on the netoffsetting positions between CME and FICC, eachclearing house may reduce the firm’s performancebond requirement. In the event of a firm default, thetotal liquidation net gain or loss on the firm’soffsetting open positions and the proceeds from theliquidation of the performance bond collateral heldby each clearing house’s supporting offsettingpositions would be divided evenly between CME andFICC. Additionally, if, after liquidation of all the92
  • 103. positions and collateral of the defaulting firm at eachrespective clearing organization, and taking intoaccount any cross-margining loss sharing payments,any of the participating clearing organizations has aremaining liquidating surplus, and any otherparticipating clearing organization has a remainingliquidating deficit, any additional surplus from theliquidation would be shared with the other clearinghouse to the extent that it has a remaining liquidatingdeficit. Any remaining surplus funds would be passedto the bankruptcy trustee.MF Global Bankruptcy Trust. The company provideda $550.0 million financial guarantee to thebankruptcy trustee of MF Global to accelerate thedistribution of funds to MF Global customers. In theevent that the trustee distributed more property in thesecond or third interim distributions than waspermitted by the Bankruptcy Code and CFTCregulations, the company will make a cash paymentto the trustee for the amount of the erroneousdistribution or distributions up to $550.0 million inthe aggregate. A payment will only be made after thetrustee makes reasonable efforts to collect theproperty erroneously distributed to the customer(s). Ifa payment is made by the company, the companymay have the right to seek reimbursement of theerroneously distributed property from the applicablecustomer(s). The guarantee does not coverdistributions made by the trustee to customers on thebasis of their claims filed in the bankruptcy. Becausethe trustee has now made payments to nearly allcustomers on the basis of their claims, the companybelieves that the likelihood of payment to the trusteeis very remote. As a result, the guarantee liability isestimated to be immaterial at December 31, 2012.Family Farmer and Rancher Protection Fund. InApril 2012, the company established the FamilyFarmer and Rancher Protection Fund (the Fund). TheFund is designed to provide payments, up to certainmaximum levels, to family farmers, ranchers andother agricultural industry participants who use CMEGroup agricultural products and who suffer losses totheir segregated account balances due to their CMEclearing member becoming insolvent. Under theterms of the Fund, farmers and ranchers are eligiblefor up to $25,000 per participant. Farming andranching cooperatives are eligible for up to $100,000per cooperative. The Fund has an aggregatemaximum payment amount of $100.0 million. Ifpayments to participants were to exceed this amount,payments would be pro-rated. Clearing members andcustomers must register in advance with the companyand provide certain documentation in order tosubstantiate their eligibility.Peregrine Financial Group, Inc. (PFG) filed forbankruptcy protection on July 10, 2012. PFG was notone of CME’s clearing members and its customershad not registered for the Fund. Accordingly, theywere not technically eligible for payments from theFund. However, because the Fund was newlyimplemented and because PFG’s customers includedmany agricultural industry participants for whom theprogram was designed, the company decided towaive certain terms and conditions of the Fund,solely in connection with the PFG bankruptcy, so thatotherwise eligible family farmers, ranchers andagricultural cooperatives could apply for and receivebenefits from CME. Based on the number of suchPFG customers who applied and the estimated size oftheir claims, the company has recorded a liability inthe amount of $2.1 million at December 31, 2012.16. REDEEMABLE NON-CONTROLLINGINTERESTThe following summarizes the changes in redeemablenon-controlling interest for the years presented. Non-controlling interests that do not contain redemptionfeatures are presented in the statements of equity.(in millions) 2012 2011 2010Balance at January 1 . . . . . $70.3 $68.1 $ —Contribution by DowJones . . . . . . . . . . . — — 675.0Distribution to DowJones . . . . . . . . . . . — — (607.5)Allocation of stock-basedcompensation . . . . — 0.1 —Total comprehensiveincome attributableto redeemable non-controllinginterest . . . . . . . . . . 10.5 2.1 0.6Balance atDecember 31 . . . . . . . . . $80.8 $70.3 $ 68.193
  • 104. 17. CAPITAL STOCKShares Outstanding. The following table presentsinformation regarding capital stock:December 31,(in thousands) 2012 2011Class A common stockauthorized . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000,000 1,000,000Class A common stockissued and outstanding . . . 331,832 330,653Class B-1 common stockauthorized, issued andoutstanding . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.6 0.6Class B-2 common stockauthorized, issued andoutstanding . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.8 0.8Class B-3 common stockauthorized, issued andoutstanding . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 1.3Class B-4 common stockauthorized, issued andoutstanding . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.4 0.4In May 2012, the company’s board of directorsdeclared a five-for-one split of its Class A commonstock by way of a stock dividend to its Class A andClass B shareholders. The stock split was effectiveJuly 20, 2012 for all shareholders of record onJuly 10, 2012. As a result of the stock split, allamounts related to shares and earnings per share havebeen retroactively restated. Since the par value of theclass A common stock remained at $0.01 per share,the recorded value for class A common stock wasretroactively adjusted to reflect the par value of totaloutstanding shares.CME Group has no shares of preferred stock issuedand outstanding.Associated Trading Rights. Members of CME,CBOT, NYMEX, COMEX and permit holders ofKCBT own or lease trading rights which entitle themto access the trading floors, discounts on trading feesand the right to vote on certain exchange matters asprovided for by the rules of the particular exchangeand CME Group’s or the subsidiaries’ organizationaldocuments. Each class of CME Group Class Bcommon stock is associated with a membership in aspecific division for trading at CME. A CME tradingright is a separate asset that is not part of orevidenced by the associated share of Class Bcommon stock of CME Group. The Class B commonstock of CME Group is intended only to ensure thatthe Class B shareholders of CME Group retain rightswith respect to representation on the board ofdirectors and approval rights with respect to the corerights described below.Trading rights at CBOT are evidenced by Class Bmemberships in CBOT, at NYMEX by Class Amemberships in NYMEX, at COMEX by COMEXDivision Memberships and at KCBT by tradingpermits. Members of CBOT, NYMEX and COMEXand permit holders at KCBT do not have any rights toelect members of the board of directors and are notentitled to receive dividends or other distributions ontheir memberships or trading permits.Core Rights. Holders of CME Group Class Bcommon shares have the right to approve changes inspecified rights relating to the trading privileges atCME associated with those shares. These core rightsrelate primarily to trading right protections, certaintrading fee protections and certain membershipbenefit protections. Votes on changes to these corerights are weighted by class. Each class of Class Bcommon stock has the following number of votes onmatters relating to core rights: Class B-1, six votesper share; Class B-2, two votes per share; Class B-3,one vote per share; and Class B-4, 1/6th of one voteper share. The approval of a majority of the votescast by the holders of shares of Class B commonstock is required in order to approve any changes tocore rights. Holders of shares of Class A commonstock do not have the right to vote on changes to corerights.Voting Rights. With the exception of the mattersreserved to holders of CME Group Class B commonstock, holders of CME Group common stock votetogether on all matters for which a vote of commonshareholders is required. In these votes, each holderof shares of Class A or Class B common stock ofCME Group has one vote per share.Transfer Restrictions. Each class of CME GroupClass B common stock is subject to transferrestrictions contained in the Certificate ofIncorporation of CME Group. These transferrestrictions prohibit the sale or transfer of any sharesof Class B common stock separate from the sale ofthe associated trading rights.94
  • 105. Election of Directors. The CME Group Board ofDirectors is currently comprised of 30 members.Holders of Class B-1, Class B-2 and Class B-3common stock have the right to elect six directors, ofwhich three are elected by Class B-1 shareholders,two are elected by Class B-2 shareholders and one iselected by Class B-3 shareholders. The remainingdirectors are elected by the Class A and Class Bshareholders voting as a single class.Dividends. Holders of Class A and Class B commonstock of CME Group are entitled to receiveproportionately such dividends, if any, as may bedeclared by the CME Group board of directors.CME Group Omnibus Stock Plan. CME Group hasadopted an Omnibus Stock Plan under which stock-based awards may be made to employees. A total of40.2 million Class A common stock shares have beenreserved for awards under the plan. Awards totaling22.4 million shares have been granted and areoutstanding or have been exercised under this plan atDecember 31, 2012 (note 18). Shares reserved underthe CME Group Omnibus Stock Plan have beenadjusted to reflect the stock split.CBOT Holdings Long-Term Equity IncentivePlan. In connection with the merger with CBOTHoldings, CME Group assumed CBOT Holdings’2005 Long-Term Equity Incentive Plan. Under theplan, stock-based awards may be made to certaindirectors, officers and other key employees orindividuals. A total of 2.3 million shares have beenreserved for awards under the plan. In connectionwith receiving shareholder approval to increase theamount of authorized shares under the OmnibusStock Plan in May 2009, the company undertook tofreeze future awards under this plan. As a result,1.6 million shares that remained authorized for futureawards under this plan were frozen. Shares reservedunder the this plan have been adjusted to reflect thestock split.NYMEX Holdings Omnibus Long-Term IncentivePlan. In connection with the merger with NYMEXHoldings, CME Group assumed NYMEX Holdings’2006 Omnibus Long-Term Incentive Plan. Under theplan, stock-based awards may be made to anydirector, officer or employee of the company andother key individuals providing services to thecompany. A total of 5.0 million shares have beenreserved for awards under the plan. In connectionwith receiving shareholder approval to increase theamount of authorized shares under the OmnibusStock Plan in May 2009, the company undertook tofreeze future awards under this plan. As a result,3.5 million shares that remained authorized for futureawards under this plan were frozen. Shares reservedunder the this plan have been adjusted to reflect thestock split.Director Stock Plan. CME Group has adopted aDirector Stock Plan under which awards are made tonon-executive directors as part of their annualcompensation. A total of 625,000 Class A shareshave been reserved under this plan, andapproximately 234,000 shares have been awardedthrough December 31, 2012. Shares reserved underthe this plan have been adjusted to reflect the stocksplit.Employee Stock Purchase Plan. CME Group hasadopted an Employee Stock Purchase Plan (ESPP)under which employees may purchase Class A sharesat 90% of the market value of the shares using after-tax payroll deductions. A total of 500,000 Class Ashares have been reserved under this plan, of whichapproximately 158,000 shares have been purchasedthrough December 31, 2012 (note 18). Sharesreserved under the Employee Stock Purchase Planhave been adjusted to reflect the stock split.Share Repurchases. In February 2010, CME Groupwas authorized by its board of directors to purchaseup to 11.8 million shares of Class A common stock.The authorization of the repurchase was approved inconnection with the company’s agreement to issueadditional Class A common shares toBM&FBOVESPA to increase its aggregate shareownership in the company to 5%. During 2010,10.0 million shares were purchased at an averageprice of $57 per share for a total cost of $575.3million. This plan’s authorization has expired.In May 2011, the board of directors authorized ashare buyback program of up to $750.0 million ofCME Group Class A common stock over a 12 monthperiod. During 2011, 4.0 million shares werepurchased at an average price of $54 per share for atotal cost of $220.4 million. This plan’s authorizationhas expired.95
  • 106. 18. STOCK-BASED PAYMENTSCME Group adopted an Omnibus Stock Plan underwhich stock-based awards may be made toemployees. A total of 40.2 million Class A shareshave been reserved for awards under the plan.Awards totaling 22.4 million shares have beengranted and are outstanding or have been exercisedunder the plan as of December 31, 2012. Awardsgranted before 2009 generally vest over a five-yearperiod, with 20% vesting one year after the grant dateand on that same date in each of the following fouryears. Beginning in 2009, awards granted generallyvest over a four-year period, with 25% vesting oneyear after the grant date and on that same date in eachof the following three years.Total compensation expense for stock-basedpayments and total income tax benefit recognized inthe consolidated statements of income for stock-based awards were as follows:(in millions) 2012 2011 2010Compensation expense . . . . . $61.4 $51.3 $40.9Income tax benefitrecognized . . . . . . . . . . . . 22.5 18.8 16.4Excluding estimates of future forfeitures, atDecember 31, 2012, there was $89.0 million of totalunrecognized compensation expense related toemployee stock-based compensation arrangementsthat had not yet vested. This expense is expected tobe recognized over a weighted average period of 2.1years.In 2012, the company granted employees stockoptions totaling 81,040 shares under the OmnibusStock Plan. The options have a ten-year term withexercise prices ranging from $53 to $57, the closingmarket prices on the grant dates. The fair value ofthese options, which was measured at the grant datesusing the Black-Scholes valuation model, totaled$1.0 million. The fair value is recognized ascompensation expense on an accelerated basis overthe vesting period.The Black-Scholes fair value of each option grantwas calculated using the following assumptions:Grant Year2012 2011 2010Dividendyield . . . . 4.2%-4.5% 1.2%-2.4% 1.4%-1.7%Expectedvolatility 40%-41% 41%-42% 42%-44%Risk-freeinterestrate . . . . . 0.8%-1.5% 2.0%-2.3% 1.9%-2.9%Expectedlife . . . . .5.0 to6.2 years5.6 to6.2 years 6.2 yearsThe dividend yield was calculated by dividing thatyear’s expected dividends by the market price of thestock at the dates of grant. A weighting of impliedand historical volatility was used to estimateexpected future volatility. The risk-free interest ratewas based on the U.S. Treasury yield in effect at thetime of each grant. The expected life of optionsgranted has been determined using the simplifiedmethod as outlined in guidance from the Securitiesand Exchange Commission.The following table summarizes stock option activity for 2012. Aggregate intrinsic value is in millions.Number of SharesWeightedAverageExercisePriceWeighted AverageRemainingContractual LifeAggregateIntrinsic ValueOutstanding at December 31, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,086,080 $60 6.4 years $29.1Granted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81,040 54Exercised . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (744,509) 30Cancelled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (527,340) 78Outstanding at December 31, 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,895,271 63 5.7 years 15.2Exercisable at December 31, 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,066,056 65 4.7 years 14.996
  • 107. The weighted average grant date fair value of optionsgranted during 2012, 2011, and 2010 was $13, $19and $20 per share, respectively. The total intrinsicvalue of options exercised during the years endedDecember 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, was $19.0million, $4.2 million and $15.6 million, respectively.In 2012, the company granted 931,340 shares ofrestricted Class A common stock and 4,048 shares ofrestricted stock units. Restricted common stock andrestricted stock units generally have a vesting periodof 2 to 4 years. The fair value related to these grantswas $54.5 million, which is recognized ascompensation expense on an accelerated basis overthe vesting period. Beginning with restricted stockgrants in September 2010, dividends are accrued onrestricted Class A common stock and restricted stockunits and are paid once the restricted stock vests. In2012, the company also granted 138,410 performanceshares. The fair value related to these grants was $7.7million, which is recognized as compensationexpense on an accelerated and straight-lined basisover the vesting period. The vesting of these shares iscontingent on meeting stated performance or marketconditions.The following table summarizes restricted stock,restricted stock units, and performance shares activityfor 2012:Number ofSharesWeightedAverageGrant DateFair ValueOutstanding at December31, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,432,610 $57Granted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,073,798 54Vested . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (366,388) 55Cancelled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (226,493) 63Outstanding at December31, 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,913,527 54The total fair value of restricted stock, restrictedstock units, and performance shares that vestedduring the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and2010, was $20.9 million, $11.6 million and $10.3million, respectively.Eligible employees may acquire shares of Class Acommon stock using after-tax payroll deductionsmade during consecutive offering periods ofapproximately six months in duration. Shares arepurchased at the end of each offering period at a priceof 90% of the closing price of the Class A commonstock as reported on the NASDAQ Global SelectMarket. Compensation expense is recognized on thedates of purchase for the discount from the closingprice. In 2012, 2011 and 2010, a total of 27,768,32,085 and 21,855 shares, respectively, of Class Acommon stock were issued to participatingemployees. These shares are subject to a six-monthholding period. Annual expense of $0.1 million, $0.2million and $0.1 million for the purchase discountwas recognized in 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.Non-executive directors receive an annual award ofClass A common stock with a value equal to$75,000. Non-executive directors may also elect toreceive some or all of the cash portion of their annualstipend, up to $25,000, in shares of stock based onthe closing price at the date of distribution. As aresult, 40,260, 40,585 and 37,350 shares of Class Acommon stock were issued to non-executive directorsduring 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Theseshares are not subject to any vesting restrictions.Expense of $2.2 million, $2.1 million and $2.4million related to these stock-based payments wasrecognized for the years ended December 31, 2012,2011 and 2010, respectively.19. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTSIn general, the company uses quoted prices in activemarkets for identical assets to determine the fairvalue of marketable securities and equityinvestments. Level 1 assets generally include U.S.Treasury securities, equity securities listed in activemarkets, and investments in publicly traded mutualfunds with quoted market prices. If quoted prices arenot available to determine fair value, the companyuses other inputs that are directly observable.Assets included in level 2 generally consist of asset-backed securities, municipal bonds, U.S. governmentagency securities and interest rate swap contracts.Asset-backed securities, municipal bonds and U.S.government agency securities were measured at fairvalue based on matrix pricing using prices of similarsecurities with similar inputs such as maturity dates,interest rates and credit ratings. The companydetermined the fair value of its interest rate swapcontracts using standard valuation models withmarket-based observable inputs including forwardand spot exchange rates and interest rate curves.97
  • 108. The company determined the fair value of itscontingent consideration liabilities, considered level3 liabilities, using a discounted cash flow model tocalculate the present value of future payouts. Theliabilities were included in level 3 becausemanagement used significant unobservable inputs,including a discount rate of 20% and payoutprobabilities ranging from 89% to 100%. Significantincreases or decreases in any of those inputs inisolation would result in a significantly different fairvalue.Financial assets and liabilities recorded in theconsolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2012and 2011 were classified in their entirety based onthe lowest level of input that was significant to eachasset or liability’s fair value measurement.Financial Instruments Measured at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis:December 31, 2012(in millions) Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 TotalAssets at Fair Value:Marketable securities:U.S. Treasury securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 17.5 $ — $ — $ 17.5Mutual funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38.7 — — 38.7Asset-backed securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — 0.4 — 0.4Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56.2 0.4 — 56.6Equity investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 721.7 — — 721.7Total Assets at Fair Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $777.9 $ 0.4 $ — $778.3Liabilities at Fair Value:Interest rate swap contract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ — $ 1.0 $ — $ 1.0Contingent consideration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — — 12.6 12.6Total Liabilities at Fair Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ — $ 1.0 $12.6 $ 13.6December 31, 2011(in millions) Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 TotalAssets at Fair Value:Marketable securities:U.S. Treasury securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 5.1 $ — $ — $ 5.1Mutual funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31.8 — — 31.8Municipal bonds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — 4.5 — 4.5Asset-backed securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — 0.9 — 0.9U.S. Government agency securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — 5.3 — 5.3Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36.9 10.7 — 47.6Equity investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552.8 — — 552.8Total Assets at Fair Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $589.7 $10.7 $ — $600.4Liabilities at Fair Value:Contingent consideration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ — $ — $10.3 $ 10.3Total Liabilities at Fair Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ — $ — $10.3 $ 10.398
  • 109. There were no transfers of assets between level 1 andlevel 2 during 2012 and 2011. The following is areconciliation of liabilities valued at fair value on arecurring basis using significant unobservable inputs(level 3) during 2011 and 2012. There were no assetsvalued at fair value on a recurring basis usingsignificant unobservable inputs (level 3) during 2012and 2011.(in millions)ContingentConsiderationFair value of liability at December 31,2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 9.5Realized and unrealized gains (losses):Included in operating expense . . . 0.8Fair value of liability at December 31,2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.3Contingent obligation arising fromacquisition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2Realized and unrealized gains (losses):Included in operating expense . . . 1.1Fair value of liability at December 31,2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12.6There were no assets or liabilities valued at fair valueon a nonrecurring basis using significantunobservable inputs (Level 3) during 2012.20. EARNINGS PER SHAREBasic earnings per share is computed by dividing netincome attributable to CME Group by the weightedaverage number of shares of all classes of commonstock outstanding for each reporting period. Dilutedearnings per share reflects the increase in sharesusing the treasury stock method to reflect the impactof an equivalent number of shares of common stockif stock options were exercised and restricted stockawards were converted into common stock. Anti-dilutive stock options and restricted stock awardswere as follows for the years presented:(in thousands) 2012 2011 2010Stock options . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,851 4,689 4,239Restricted stock awards . . . . — — 16Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,851 4,689 4,255The following table presents the earnings per share calculation for the years presented:2012 2011 2010Net Income Attributable to CME Group (in millions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 896.3 $ 1,812.3 $ 951.4Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding (in thousands):Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331,252 332,737 331,493Effect of stock options and restricted stock awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,067 1,074 982Diluted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332,319 333,811 332,475Earnings per Common Share Attributable to CME Group:Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2.71 $ 5.45 $ 2.87Diluted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.70 5.43 2.8699
  • 110. 21. QUARTERLY INFORMATION (UNAUDITED)(in millions, except per share data)FirstQuarterSecondQuarterThirdQuarterFourthQuarterYear toDateYear Ended December 31, 2012Total revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $774.6 $795.9 $683.2 $660.9 $2,914.6Operating income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451.2 469.2 396.0 375.6 1,692.0Non-operating income (expense) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (17.8) 41.5 (0.2) (22.1) 1.4Income before income taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433.4 510.7 395.8 353.5 1,693.4Net income attributable to CME Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266.6 244.9 218.0 166.8 896.3Earnings per common share attributable to CME Group:Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 0.81 $ 0.74 $ 0.66 $ 0.50 $ 2.71Diluted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.80 0.74 0.66 0.50 2.70Year Ended December 31, 2011Total revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $831.6 $838.3 $874.2 $736.5 $3,280.6Operating income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 524.1 534.5 572.1 390.4 2,021.1Non-operating income (expense) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (12.5) (25.2) (26.2) (20.7) (84.6)Income before income taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511.6 509.3 545.9 369.7 1,936.5Net income attributable to CME Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456.6 293.7 316.1 745.9 1,812.3Earnings per common share attributable to CME Group:Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1.37 $ 0.88 $ 0.95 $ 2.26 $ 5.45Diluted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.36 0.88 0.95 2.25 5.4322. SUBSEQUENT EVENTSThe company has evaluated subsequent eventsthrough the date the financial statements were issued.The company has determined that there were nosubsequent events that require disclosure.ITEM 9. CHANGES IN ANDDISAGREEMENTS WITHACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTINGAND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURENot applicable.ITEM 9A.CONTROLS AND PROCEDURESEvaluation of Disclosure Controls and ProceduresOur management, with the participation of our ChiefExecutive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, hasevaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controlsand procedures (as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities ExchangeAct of 1934, as amended (Exchange Act)) as of theend of the period covered by this Annual Report onForm 10-K. Based on such evaluation, our ChiefExecutive Officer and Chief Financial Officer haveconcluded that, as of the end of such period, ourdisclosure controls and procedures are effective.Management’s Annual Report on Internal Controlover Financial ReportingManagement is responsible for establishing andmaintaining adequate internal control over financialreporting. Our internal control system has beendesigned to provide reasonable assurance tomanagement and the board of directors regarding thepreparation and fair presentation of publishedfinancial statements.Management assessed the effectiveness of theCompany’s internal control over financial reporting asof December 31, 2012. Management based itsassessment on criteria for effective internal controlover financial reporting described in Internal Control-Integrated Framework Issued by the Committee ofSponsoring Organizations of the TreadwayCommission. Management’s assessment includedevaluating the design of our internal control overfinancial reporting and testing the operationaleffectiveness of our internal control over financialreporting. The results of its assessment were reviewedwith the audit committee of the board of directors.Based on this assessment, management believes that,as of December 31, 2012, our internal control overfinancial reporting is effective. The effectiveness ofour internal control over financial reporting as ofDecember 31, 2012 has been audited by Ernst &Young LLP, an independent registered publicaccounting firm, as stated in the following report.100
  • 111. REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRMThe Board of Directors and Shareholders of CMEGroup Inc.We have audited the accompanying consolidatedbalance sheets of CME Group Inc. and subsidiariesas of December 31, 2012 and 2011, and the relatedconsolidated statements of income, comprehensiveincome, shareholders’ equity and cash flows for eachof the three years in the period ended December 31,2012. Our audit also included the financial statementschedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a). Thesefinancial statements are the responsibility of theCompany’s management. Our responsibility is toexpress an opinion on these financial statementsbased on our audits.We conducted our audits in accordance with thestandards of the Public Company AccountingOversight Board (United States). Those standardsrequire that we plan and perform the audit to obtainreasonable assurance about whether the financialstatements are free of material misstatement. Anaudit also includes examining, on a test basis,evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures inthe financial statements. An audit also includesassessing the accounting principles used andsignificant estimates made by management, as wellas evaluating the overall financial statementpresentation. We believe that our audits provide areasonable basis for our opinion.In our opinion, the financial statements referred toabove present fairly, in all material respects, theconsolidated financial position of CME Group Inc.and subsidiaries at December 31, 2012 and 2011, andthe consolidated results of their operations and theircash flows for each of the three years in the periodended December 31, 2012, in conformity with U.S.generally accepted accounting principles.We also have audited, in accordance with thestandards of the Public Company AccountingOversight Board (United States), CME Group Inc.’sinternal control over financial reporting as ofDecember 31, 2012, based on criteria established inInternal Control-Integrated Framework issued by theCommittee of Sponsoring Organizations of theTreadway Commission and our report datedFebruary 28, 2013 expressed an unqualified opinionthereon.Ernst & Young, LLPChicago, IllinoisFebruary 28, 2013101
  • 112. REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRMThe Board of Directors and Shareholders of CMEGroup Inc.We have audited CME Group Inc.’s internal controlover financial reporting as of December 31, 2012,based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee ofSponsoring Organizations of the TreadwayCommission (the COSO criteria). CME Group Inc.’smanagement is responsible for maintaining effectiveinternal control over financial reporting, and for itsassessment of the effectiveness of internal controlover financial reporting included in theaccompanying Management’s Annual Report onInternal Control over Financial Reporting. Ourresponsibility is to express an opinion on thecompany’s internal control over financial reportingbased on our audit.We conducted our audit in accordance with thestandards of the Public Company AccountingOversight Board (United States). Those standardsrequire that we plan and perform the audit to obtainreasonable assurance about whether effective internalcontrol over financial reporting was maintained in allmaterial respects. Our audit included obtaining anunderstanding of internal control over financialreporting, assessing the risk that a material weaknessexists, testing and evaluating the design andoperating effectiveness of internal control based onthe assessed risk, and performing such otherprocedures as we considered necessary in thecircumstances. We believe that our audit provides areasonable basis for our opinion.A company’s internal control over financial reportingis a process designed to provide reasonable assuranceregarding the reliability of financial reporting and thepreparation of financial statements for externalpurposes in accordance with generally acceptedaccounting principles. A company’s internal controlover financial reporting includes those policies andprocedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance ofrecords that, in reasonable detail, accurately andfairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of theassets of the company; (2) provide reasonableassurance that transactions are recorded as necessaryto permit preparation of financial statements inaccordance with generally accepted accountingprinciples, and that receipts and expenditures of thecompany are being made only in accordance withauthorizations of management and directors of thecompany; and (3) provide reasonable assuranceregarding prevention or timely detection ofunauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of thecompany’s assets that could have a material effect onthe financial statements.Because of its inherent limitations, internal controlover financial reporting may not prevent or detectmisstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation ofeffectiveness to future periods are subject to the riskthat controls may become inadequate because ofchanges in conditions, or that the degree ofcompliance with the policies or procedures maydeteriorate.In our opinion, CME Group Inc. maintained, in allmaterial respects, effective internal control overfinancial reporting as of December 31, 2012, basedon the COSO criteria.We also have audited, in accordance with thestandards of the Public Company AccountingOversight Board (United States), the consolidatedbalance sheets as of December 31, 2012 and 2011and the related consolidated statements of income,comprehensive income, shareholders’ equity, andcash flows for each of the three years in the periodended December 31, 2012 of CME Group Inc. andour report dated February 28, 2013 expressed anunqualified opinion thereon.Ernst & Young LLPChicago, IllinoisFebruary 28, 2013102
  • 113. Changes in Internal Control over FinancialReportingAs required by Rule 13a-15(d) under the ExchangeAct, the company’s management, including thecompany’s Chief Executive Officer and ChiefFinancial Officer, have evaluated the company’sinternal control over financial reporting (as such termis defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under theExchange Act) to determine whether any changesoccurred during the fourth quarter of 2012 that havematerially affected, or are reasonably likely tomaterially affect, the company’s internal control overfinancial reporting. There were no changes in thecompany’s internal control over financial reportingduring the period covered by this report that havematerially affected, or are reasonably likely tomaterially affect, internal control over financialreporting.ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATIONNot applicable.PART IIIITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVEOFFICERS AND CORPORATEGOVERNANCEWe have adopted a written code of conductapplicable to all of our employees, including ourExecutive Chairman & President, Chief ExecutiveOfficer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief AccountingOfficer and other senior financial officers. Inaccordance with SEC rules and regulations, our Codeof Conduct is available on our Web site atwww.cmegroup.com under the “Investor Relations-Corporate Governance” link. We intend to disclosepromptly on our Web site any substantiveamendments to our Code of Conduct and, inaccordance with the listing requirements of theNASDAQ, any waivers granted to our executiveofficers or Board members will be promptlydisclosed on a Current Report on Form 8-K. Inaddition, we have adopted Corporate GovernancePrinciples which govern the practices of our board ofdirectors. You may also obtain a copy of our Code ofConduct and our Corporate Governance Principles byfollowing the instructions in the section of thisAnnual Report on Form 10-K entitled “Item 1.Business-Available Information.”Certain of the information called for by this item ishereby incorporated herein by reference to therelevant portions of CME Group’s definitive proxystatement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders tobe held on May 22, 2013, to be filed by CME Groupwith the Securities and Exchange Commissionpursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days afterDecember 31, 2012 (Proxy Statement). Additionalinformation called for by this item is contained inItem 1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K under thecaption “Employees-Executive Officers.”ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATIONCertain of the information called for by this item ishereby incorporated herein by reference to therelevant portions of the Proxy Statement.ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OFCERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERSAND MANAGEMENT ANDRELATED SHAREHOLDERMATTERSCertain of the information called for by this itemrelating to the security ownership of certainbeneficial owners and management is herebyincorporated herein by reference to the relevantportions of the Proxy Statement.Equity Compensation Plan InformationWe currently have the following equity compensationplans: CME Group Inc. Amended and RestatedOmnibus Stock Plan, the CME Group Inc. 2005Director Stock Plan, CME Group Inc. Amended andRestated Employee Stock Purchase Plan, Amendedand Restated CBOT Holdings, Inc. 2005 Long-TermEquity Plan and the Amended and Restated NYMEXHoldings, Inc. 2006 Omnibus Stock Plan. Adescription of each of these plans and the number ofshares authorized and available for future awards isincluded in note 17 of the notes to consolidatedfinancial statements of CME Group Inc. andsubsidiaries. In connection with our receipt ofshareholder approval to increase the authorizedshares under our Omnibus Stock Plan and ourDirector Stock Plan, we agreed not to issue futureawards under the CBOT Holdings and NYMEXplans.103
  • 114. Prior to our holding company reorganization in 2001,CME issued options under the Chicago MercantileExchange Omnibus Stock Plan, which was notapproved by CME shareholders. In connection withour holding company reorganization, CME, as thesole shareholder of CME Holdings, approved theassumption by CME Holdings of the Omnibus StockPlan. After the reorganization, the plan was amendedand restated as the Chicago Mercantile ExchangeHoldings Inc. Amended and Restated Omnibus StockPlan. Options issued prior to the sole shareholderapproval are listed in the table below as being madeunder an equity compensation plan not approved bysecurity holders, and options issued after such timeare listed below as being made under an equitycompensation plan approved by security holders. TheEmployee Stock Purchase Plan and the 2005 DirectorStock Plan were approved by shareholders at our2005 annual meeting of shareholders. In connectionwith our mergers with CBOT Holdings and NYMEXHoldings, we assumed their existing equity plans.The shares relating to the CBOT Holdings andNYMEX Holdings plans are listed in the table belowas being made under an equity compensation planapproved by security holders based upon the fact thatshareholders of the Company approved the relatedmerger transactions.Plan categoryNumber of Securities to beIssued Upon Exercise ofOutstanding Options (a)Weighted-Average ExercisePrice of OutstandingOptions (b)Number of SecuritiesRemaining Available forFuture Issuance UnderEquity Compensation Plans(excluding securitiesreflected in column (a))(c)Equity compensation plansapproved by security holders . . . 5,895,271 $62.51 23,725,139Equity compensation plans notapproved by security holders . . . —Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,895,271 23,725,139ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS,RELATED TRANSACTIONS ANDDIRECTOR INDEPENDENCECertain of the information called for by this item ishereby incorporated herein by reference to therelevant portions of the Proxy Statement.ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEESAND SERVICESCertain of the information called for by this item ishereby incorporated herein by reference to therelevant portions of the Proxy Statement.104
  • 115. PART IVITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIALSTATEMENT SCHEDULES(a) Financial Statements, Financial StatementSchedules and Exhibits(1) Financial StatementsThe following Consolidated Financial Statements andrelated Notes included within Item 8, together withthe Reports of Independent Registered PublicAccounting Firm with respect thereto and includedwithin Item 9A, are hereby incorporated byreference:Reports of Independent Registered PublicAccounting FirmConsolidated Balance Sheets at December 31,2012 and 2011Consolidated Statements of Income for the YearsEnded December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010Consolidated Statements of ComprehensiveIncome for the Years Ended December 31, 2012,2011 and 2010Consolidated Statements of Equity for the YearsEnded December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for theYears Ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements(2) Financial Statement SchedulesThe following Financial Statement Schedule is filed as part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K:CME Group Inc. and SubsidiariesSchedule II—Valuation and Qualifying AccountsFor the Years Ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010(dollars in millions)Balance atbeginningof yearChargedagainstgoodwillCharged(credited) tocosts andexpenses Other(1)Balanceat endof yearYear Ended December 31, 2012Allowance for doubtful accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1.3 $— $ 1.0 $ (1.5) $ 0.8Allowance for deferred tax assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43.2 0.5 (3.0) (15.9) 24.8Year Ended December 31, 2011Allowance for doubtful accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1.6 $— $ 22.4 $ (22.7) $ 1.3Allowance for deferred tax assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258.4 — (46.4) (168.8) 43.2Year Ended December 31, 2010Allowance for doubtful accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1.9 $— $ 0.2 $ (0.5) $ 1.6Allowance for deferred tax assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264.4 — (6.1) 0.1 258.4(1) Includes write-offs of doubtful accounts and reversals of deferred tax asset valuation allowances againstaccumulated other comprehensive income.All other schedules have been omitted because theinformation required to be set forth in thoseschedules is not applicable or is shown in theconsolidated financial statements or notes thereto.(3) ExhibitsSee (b) Exhibits below105
  • 116. (b) ExhibitsExhibitNumber Description of Exhibit2. Plan of Acquisition, Reorganization, Arrangement, Liquidation or Succession2.1 Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of March 17, 2008, among CME Group Inc., CMEG NYInc., NYMEX Holdings, Inc. and New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (incorporated by referenceto Exhibit 2.1 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on March 21, 2008, File No.000-33379); Amendment, dated June 30, 2008 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to CMEGroup Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on August 7, 2008, File No. 001-31553);Amendment, dated as of July 18, 2008 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to CME Group’sCurrent Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 23, 2008, File No. 001-31553);Amendment, dated as of August 7, 2008 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.2 to CMEGroup’s Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on November 10, 2008, File No. 001-31553).3. Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws3.1 Fourth Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of CME Group Inc. (incorporated byreference to Exhibit 3.1 to CME Group Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC onMay 29, 2012, File No. 001-31553).3.2 Ninth Amended and Restated Bylaws of CME Group Inc. (incorporated by reference toExhibit 3.1 to CME Group Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on November14, 2012, File No. 001-31553).4. Instruments Defining the Rights of Security Holders4.1 Commercial Paper Dealer Agreement, dated as of August 16, 2007, among CME Group Inc., asIssuer, and Lehman Brothers Inc., as Dealer (subsequently assigned to Barclays Capital Inc. inconnection with the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.) (incorporated by reference toExhibit 4.2 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on November 8, 2007,File No. 000-33379).4.2 Issuing and Paying Agency Agreement, dated as of August 16, 2007, between CME Group Inc.and JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as Issuing and Paying Agent (incorporated byreference to Exhibit 4.3 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on November 8,2007, File No. 000-33379).4.3 Commercial Paper Dealer Agreement, dated as of August 20, 2008, between CME Group Inc., asIssuer, and Banc of America Securities LLC, as Dealer (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1to CME Group Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on August 26, 2008,File No. 001-31553).4.4 Commercial Paper Dealer Agreement, dated as of August 22, 2008, between CME Group Inc., asIssuer, and Goldman, Sachs & Co., as Dealer (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to CMEGroup Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on August 26, 2008,File No. 001-31553).4.5 Indenture, dated August 12, 2008, between CME Group Inc. and U.S. Bank National Association(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to CME Group Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filedwith the SEC on August 13, 2008, File No. 001-31553).4.6 Third Supplemental Indenture, dated August 12, 2008 (including the form of 5.4% note due2013), between CME Group Inc. and U.S. Bank National Association (incorporated by referenceto Exhibit 4.4 to CME Group Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC onAugust 13, 2008, File No. 001-31553).106
  • 117. ExhibitNumber Description of Exhibit4.7 Fourth Supplemental Indenture (including the form of 5.75% note due 2014), dated February9, 2009, between CME Group Inc. and U.S. Bank National Association (incorporated byreference to Exhibit 4.2 to CME Group Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SECon February 9, 2009, File No. 001-31553).4.8 Fifth Supplemental Indenture (including the form of 3.00% note due 2022), dated September10, 2012, between CME Group Inc. and U.S. Bank National Association (incorporated byreference to Exhibit 4.2 to CME Group Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SECon September 10, 2012, File No. 001-31553).4.9 Indenture (including the form of 4.40% note due 2018), dated March 18, 2010, between CMEGroup Index Services LLC, CME Group Inc. and U.S. Bank National Association(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to CME Group Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K,filed with the SEC on March 23, 2010, File No. 001-31553).10. Material Contracts10.1(1)* CME Group Inc. Amended and Restated Omnibus Stock Plan, amended and restated effectiveas of May 23, 2012 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 8-K,filed with the SEC on May 29, 2012, File No. 001-31553); First Amendment to the Amendedand Restated Omnibus Stock Plan, effective as of December 5, 2012.*10.2(1)* Form of Equity Grant Letter for Executive Officers.10.3(1) Form of equity grant letter for performance based shares based on specific Companyinitiatives (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.7 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filedwith the SEC on August 5, 2011, File No. 001-31553).10.4(1)* Form of equity grant letter for annual grant of performance shares.10.5(1) CME Group Inc. 2005 Director Stock Plan, amended and restated effective as of May 13, 2009(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to CME Group Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K,filed with the SEC on May 18, 2009, File No. 001-31553).10.6(1) Form of Equity Stipend Grant Letter for Non-Executive Directors (incorporated by referenceto Exhibit 10.4 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on February 26, 2010,File No. 001-31553).10.7(1)* CME Group Inc.’s Amended and Restated Employee Stock Purchase Plan, amended andrestated as of May 23, 2012 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to CME Group Inc.’sForm 8-K, filed with the SEC on May 29, 2012, File No. 001-31553; First Amendment to theAmended and Restated Employee Stock Purchase Plan, effective as of December 5, 2012.*10.8(1) Amended and Restated CBOT Holdings, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Equity Plan, amended andrestated as of December 31, 2008 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 to CME GroupInc.’s Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on March 2, 2009, File No. 001-31553).10.9(1) Amended and Restated NYMEX Holdings, Inc. 2006 Omnibus Long-Term Incentive Plan,amended and restated as of December 31, 2008 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.7 toCME Group Inc.’s Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on March 2, 2009, File No. 001-31553).10.10(1) Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. Senior Management Supplemental Deferred Savings Plan(SMSDSP) consisting of the Grandfathered SMSDSP, amended and restated as of January 1,2008, and the Amended and Restated 409A SMSDSP, amended and restated as of January 1,2008 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.7 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-K, filed withthe SEC on February 28, 2008, File No. 000-33379).107
  • 118. ExhibitNumber Description of Exhibit10.11(1) Amended and Restated Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. Directors’ Deferred CompensationPlan, amended and restated as of January 1, 2009 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.9to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on March 2, 2009, File No. 001-31553).10.12(1) New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. Executive Deferred Compensation Plan for KeyEmployees (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to NYMEX Holdings, Inc.’sForm 10-K, filed with the SEC on March 29, 2001, File No. 333-30332).10.13(1) Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan consisting of theGrandfathered Supplemental Retirement Plan, amended and restated as of January 1, 2008,and the Amended and Restated 409A Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan, amended andrestated as of January 1, 2008 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.9 to CME GroupInc.’s Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on February 28, 2008, File No. 000-33379).10.14(1) Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. Supplemental Executive Retirement Trust; FirstAmendment thereto, dated September 7, 1993 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 toChicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.’s Form S-4, filed with the SEC on February 24, 2000,File No. 333-95561); Second Amendment to Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. SeniorManagement Supplemental Deferred Savings Plan, executed as of April 25, 2011(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with theSEC on August 5, 2011, File No. 001-31553)10.15(1) COMEX Members’ Recognition and Retention Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit10.11 to NYMEX Holdings, Inc.’s Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on March 29, 2001,File No. 333-30332).10.16(1) Amended and Restated CME Group Inc. Incentive Plan for Named Executive Officers(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to CME Group Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K,filed with the SEC on May 18, 2009, File No. 001-31553); Amendment, effective as ofFebruary 2, 2010 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.14 to CME Group Inc.’sForm 10-K, filed with the SEC on February 26, 2010, File No. 001-31553); SecondAmendment to the Amended and Restated CME Group Inc. Annual Incentive Plan forNamed Executive Officers, executed as of April 25, 2011 (incorporated by reference toExhibit 10.5 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on August 5, 2011,File No. 001-31553).10.17(1)* CME Group Inc. Severance Plan for Eligible Executives, amended and restated effectiveJanuary 1, 2013.10.18(1)* CME Group Inc. Severance Plan, amended and restate effective January 1, 2013.10.19(1) Amended Agreement, effective as of April 18, 2012, between CME Group Inc. and TerrenceA. Duffy (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filedwith the SEC on May 8, 2012, File No. 001-31553).10.20(1) Amended Agreement, effective as of April 18, 2012, between CME Group Inc. andPhupinder S. Gill (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to CME Group Inc.’sForm 10-Q, filed with the SEC on May 8, 2012, File No. 001-31553).10.21(1) Consulting Agreement between Leo Melamed and CME Group Inc., dated June 26, 2009(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with theSEC on August 6, 2009, File No. 001-31553).108
  • 119. ExhibitNumber Description of Exhibit10.22(1) Consulting Agreement between Leo Melamed and Chicago Mercantile Exchange Holdings Inc.,dated November 14, 2005 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.28 to Chicago MercantileExchange Holdings Inc.’s Form 10-K filed with the SEC on March 6, 2006,File No. 000-33379); Amendment, dated as of June 21, 2012 (incorporated by reference toExhibit 10.4 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on August 8, 2012,File No. 001-31553).10.23(1)* Consulting Agreement between John F. Sandner and Chicago Mercantile Exchange HoldingsInc., dated October 10, 2005 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to Chicago MercantileExchange Holdings Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on November 4, 2005,File No. 000-33379); Amendment, dated November 30, 2012.*10.24(1) Craig S. Donohue Retirement Agreement, dated as of May 1, 2012 (incorporated by reference toExhibit 10.1 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on May 2, 2012,File No. 001-31553).10.25(2) License Agreement, dated June 29, 2012, between Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLCand Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 to CMEGroup Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on August 8, 2012, File No. 001-31553).10.26(2) Amended and Restated Index License Agreement, between CME Group Index Services LLCand the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, Inc., effective as of July 1, 2011 (incorporated byreference to Exhibit 10.5 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on August 8,2012, File No. 001-31553).10.27(2) License Agreement, effective as of October 9, 2003, between The Nasdaq Stock Market, Inc., asubsidiary of National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc., and Chicago Mercantile ExchangeInc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.9 to Chicago Mercantile Exchange Holdings Inc.’sForm 10-K, filed with the SEC on March 11, 2004, File No. 001-31553), Amendment, datedApril 26, 2005 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Chicago Mercantile ExchangeHoldings Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on August 4, 2005, File No. 001-31553);Amendment, dated June 22, 2005 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to ChicagoMercantile Exchange Holdings Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on August 4, 2005,File No. 001-31553); Amendment, dated as of June 26, 2008 (incorporated by reference toExhibit 10.1 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on August 7, 2008,File No. 001-31553).10.28 Credit Agreement, dated as of November 30, 2012, among CME Group, certain financialinstitutions and other persons party thereto as lenders, and Bank of America, N.A., asadministrative agent, Barclays Bank PLC, Citibank, N.A., UBS Securities LLC, and WellsFargo Bank, National Association as co-syndication agents, and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner &Smith Incorporated, Barclays Bank PLC, UBS Securities LLC, and Wells Fargo Securities, LLCas joint lead arrangers and joint book managers (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 toCME Group Inc.’s Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on December 5, 2012, File No. 001-31553);Amendment No. 1 to Credit Agreement and Joinder Agreement, dated as of November 30, 2012,including the Consolidated Form Credit Agreement as Annex A, among CME Group Inc.,certain financial institutions and other persons party thereto as lenders, and Bank of America,N.A., as administrative agent (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to CME Group Inc.’sForm 8-K, filed with the SEC on December 5, 2012, File No. 001-31553).109
  • 120. ExhibitNumber Description of Exhibit10.29 Chicago Mercantile Exchange Credit Agreement, dated as of November 8, 2012, with eachof the banks from time to time party thereto; Bank of America, N.A., as administrativeagent; Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, as collateral agent; Barclays Bank PLCand Bank of China, New York Branch, as syndication agents; The Bank of Nova Scotia,BMO Harris Bank N.A., Citibank, N.A., Lloyds TSB Bank PLC, The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, LTD., UBS Securities LLC, and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association,as documentation agents; and Merrill Lynch, Piece, Fenner & Smith Incorporated,Barclays Bank PLC and Bank of China, New York Branch, as joint lead arrangers(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to CME Group Inc.’s Form 8-K, filed with theSEC on November 14, 2012, File No. 001-31553).10.30 Commercial Paper Dealer Agreement, dated as of August 16, 2007, among CME GroupInc., as Issuer, and Lehman Brothers Inc., as Dealer (subsequently assigned to BarclaysCapital Inc. in connection with the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.)(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 above).10.31 Issuing and Paying Agency Agreement, dated as of August 16, 2007, between CME GroupInc. and JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as Issuing and Paying Agent(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 above).10.32 Commercial Paper Dealer Agreement, dated as of August 20, 2008, between CME GroupInc., as Issuer, and Banc of America Securities LLC, as Dealer (incorporated by referenceto Exhibit 4.3 above).10.33 Commercial Paper Dealer Agreement, dated as of August 22, 2008, between CME GroupInc., as Issuer, and Goldman, Sachs & Co., as Dealer (incorporated by reference to Exhibit4.4 above).10.34 Ground Lease between Battery Park City Authority and New York Mercantile Exchangedated May 18, 1995 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to NYMEX Holdings,Inc.’s Registration Statement on Form S-4, filed with the SEC on April 14, 2000, File No.333-30332).10.35 Funding Agreement among New York State Urban Development Corporation, New YorkCity Economic Development Corporation, Battery Park City Authority and New YorkMercantile Exchange dated May 18, 1995 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 toNYMEX Holdings, Inc.’s Registration Statement on Form S-4, filed with the SEC on April14, 2000, File No. 333-30332).12.1* Ratio of Fixed Charges.21.1* List of Subsidiaries of CME Group Inc.23.1* Consent of Ernst & Young LLP.31.1* Section 302—Certification of Phupinder S. Gill.31.2* Section 302—Certification of James E. Parisi.32.1* Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 ofthe Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.110
  • 121. ExhibitNumber Description of Exhibit101.INS* XBRL Instance Document101.SCH* XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document101.CAL* XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document101.DEF* XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase101.LAB* XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document101.PRE* XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document* Filed herewith.(1) Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.(2) Confidential treatment pursuant to Rule 406 of the Securities Act has been previously granted by the SEC forportions of this exhibit.111
  • 122. SIGNATURESPursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registranthas duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized, in theCity of Chicago and State of Illinois on the 28th day of February, 2013.CME Group Inc.By: /s/ JAMES E. PARISIJames E. ParisiManaging Director and Chief Financial OfficerSignature Title/s/ TERRENCE A. DUFFYTerrence A. DuffyExecutive Chairman of the Board and Director &President/s/ PHUPINDER S. GILLPhupinder S. GillChief Executive Officer and Director/s/ JAMES E. PARISIJames E. ParisiSenior Managing Director and Chief Financial Officer/s/ JAMES V. PIEPERJames V. PieperManaging Director and Chief Accounting Officer/s/ LEO MELAMEDLeo MelamedChairman Emeritus and Director/s/ JEFFREY M. BERNACCHIJeffrey M. BernacchiDirector/s/ TIMOTHY S. BITSBERGERTimothy S. BitsbergerDirector/s/ CHARLES P. CAREYCharles P. CareyDirector/s/ MARK E. CERMAKMark E. CermakDirector/s/ DENNIS H. CHOOKASZIANDennis H. ChookaszianDirector/s/ JACKIE CLEGGJackie CleggDirector/s/ JAMES A. DONALDSONJames A. DonaldsonDirector112
  • 123. /s/ MARTIN J. GEPSMANMartin J. GepsmanDirector/s/ LARRY G. GERDESLarry G. GerdesDirector/s/ DANIEL R. GLICKMANDaniel R. GlickmanDirector/s/ J. DENNIS HASTERTJ. Dennis HastertDirector/s/ BRUCE F. JOHNSONBruce F. JohnsonDirector/s/ GARY M. KATLERGary M. KatlerDirector/s/ WILLIAM P. MILLER IIWilliam P. Miller IIDirector/s/ JOSEPH NICIFOROJoseph NiciforoDirector/s/ C.C. ODOM IIC.C. Odom IIDirector/s/ JAMES E. OLIFFJames E. OliffDirector/s/ RONALD A. PANKAURonald A. PankauDirector/s/ EDEMIR PINTOEdemir PintoDirector/s/ ALEX J. POLLOCKAlex J. PollockDirector/s/ JOHN F. SANDNERJohn F. SandnerDirector/s/ TERRY L. SAVAGETerry L. SavageDirector/s/ WILLIAM R. SHEPARDWilliam R. ShepardDirector113
  • 124. /s/ HOWARD J. SIEGELHoward J. SiegelDirector/s/ CHRISTOPHER STEWARTChristopher StewartDirector/s/ DENNIS A. SUSKINDDennis A. SuskindDirector/s/ DAVID J. WESCOTTDavid J. WescottDirector114
  • 125. During 2012, our members and employees providedmore than 2,400 hours of volunteer service to localnon-profit organizations in Chicago, New York andLondon through Amicus, our community outreachprogram. Partner agencies included ChristopherHouse, KaBOOM!, Hephzibah House, House of theGood Shepherd, Inspiration Café, Salvation ArmyEmergency Lodge, Special Spectators, New YorkHenry Street Settlement and London Winter NightShelter. Fundraising drives were organized to benefitorganizations such as GreaterChicagoFoodDeposi-tory and United Way.CME Group also entered its eighth year of part-nershipwithWashingtonIrvingElementarySchoolaspartoftheChicagoPublicSchools’FuturesExchangeProgram. CME Group volunteers participated ina number of service projects in 2012 designed toenrich the educational experiences of the Irving stu-dents,thushelpingassurethesuccessoftomorrow’sleaders. CME Group also continued its partnershipfor a third year with New York City Public ElementarySchool 277 (PS277) in the South Bronx, supportingtheschool’sprogrammingthroughin-kinddonationsand educational field trips.The CME Group Community Foundation (www.cmegroup.com/company/corporate-citizenship)provides charitable grants focused on meetingthe needs of the global communities in which welive and do business, as well as disaster relief. Thefoundation provides support to three primary areasof concern: children in need, education and healthand human services. Through a matching giftprogram, the foundation also funds many worth-while charitable organizations that are important tothe CME Group community.Thecompanyalsoprovidesnon-financialsupportto two independent foundations: CME Group Foun-dation and CBOT Foundation.The CME Group Foundation (www.cmegroup-foundation.org)enhanceseconomicopportunitybysupporting academic initiatives and activities, pri-marily in the Chicago region, that promote research,teaching and learning in financial markets, futuresand derivatives; the education of disadvantagedchildren and youth; and the health and education ofyoung children.The CBOT Foundation (www.cmegroup.com/company/corporate-citizenship) continues to providea number of non-profit agencies in the Chicagolandareawiththefundsneededtoeffectpositivechangein the lives of those in need. The CBOT Foundationsupportsprojectsbyprovidingdirectgrantstoorga-nizations that help strengthen educational opportu-nities,promoteandprotectchildrenandseniorsandsupport animal wildlife and cultural opportunities.For more information on CME Group’s corpo-rate citizenship, please refer to the 2012 CorporateCitizenship Report.As the world’s leading and most diverse derivatives marketplace, CME Group believes thatit is both a responsibility and a privilege to give back to the global communities where welive and work. In 2012, CME Group contributed nearly $5.4 million through our charitableprograms, corporate foundation and independent foundations that we support.Corporate Citizenship
  • 126. Terrence A. DuffyExecutive Chairmanand Presidentphupinder S. gillChief Executive OfficerLeo MelamedChairman EmeritusChairman and Chief ExecutiveOfficer, Melamed andAssociates, Inc., Chicago, Ill.John F. SandnerRetired Chairman of the BoardChairman, E*Trade Futures, LLC, Chicago, Ill.Board of Directors
  • 127. James A. DonaldsonIndependent Trader, Naples, Fla.Martin J. GepsmanIndependent Broker and Trader,Chicago, Ill.Larry G. GerdesGeneral Partner, Gerdes HuffInvestments, Atlanta, Ga.Daniel R. GlickmanVice President, Aspen InstituteCongressional ProgramSenior Fellow, Bipartisan PolicyCenter, Washington, D.C.U.S. Secretary of Agriculture(1995–2001)Member of Congress, Kansas(1977–1995)Bruce F. JohnsonIndependent Trader,Chicago, Ill.Gary M. KatlerVice President, ABN AMROClearing Chicago, LLC,Chicago, Ill.J. Dennis HastertRetired Speaker of the Houseof RepresentativesMember of Congress, Illinois(1987–2007)William P. Miller IISenior Managing Directorand Chief Financial Officer,Financial Markets International,Inc., Bethesda, Md.Mark E. CermakDirector, Execution Services,ABN AMRO Clearing Chicago,LLC, Chicago, Ill.Dennis H. ChookaszianFormer Chairman, FinancialAccounting StandardsAdvisory Council,Norwalk, Conn.Former Chairman andChief Executive Officer,CNA Insurance Companies,Chicago, Ill.Timothy S. BitsbergerManaging Director, OfficialInstitutions FIG CoverageGroup, BNP PNA,Washington, D.C.Former Senior Vice Presidentand Treasurer, Freddie Mac,McLean, Va.Former Assistant Secretary,U.S.Treasury,Washington,D.C.jackie M. CleggManaging Partner, CleggInternational Consultants, LLC,Washington, D.C.Former Vice Chair, Board ofDirectors of the Export-ImportBank of the United States,Washington, D.C.Jeffery M. BernacchiPresident, JMB Trading Corp.,Barrington, Ill.Managing Member, CeleritasCapital, LLC, Chicago, Ill.Class C Member, Trade Lifts,LLC, Chicago, Ill.Charles P. CareyFormer Vice ChairmanPartner, Henning and CareyTrading, Chicago, Ill.Joseph NiciforoPrincipal, Henningand CareyTrading,Chicago, Ill.
  • 128. Board of DirectorsEdemir PintoChief Executive Officer,BM&FBOVESPA,São Paulo, BrazilDennis A. SuskindRetired Partner, Goldman,Sachs & Co.,Southampton, N.Y.David J. WescottPresident, The Wescott GroupLtd., Chicago, Ill.William R. Shepard (not pictured)President and Founder,Shepard International, Inc.,Chicago, Ill.Alex J. PollockResident Fellow, AmericanEnterprise Institute,Washington, D.C.Howard J. SiegelIndependent Trader,Chicago, Ill.Christopher StewartFormer Chief Executive Officer,Gelber Group, LLC,Chicago, Ill.Terry L. SavageFinancial Journalist and AuthorPresident, Terry SavageProductions, Ltd., Chicago, Ill.C.C. Odom IIIndependent Member/Trader,San Antonio, TexasSole Proprietor, Odom Invest-ments and Argent VentureCapital, San Antonio, TexasJames E. OliffPresident, FILO Corp.,Chicago, Ill.ronald A. pankauIndependent Trader,Chicago, Ill.Owner, J. H. Best and SonsSteel Fabricating Co.,Chicago, Ill.
  • 129. Management Teamterrence A. DuffyExecutive Chairmanand PresidentPhupinder S. GillChief Executive OfficerKathleen M. CroninSenior Managing Director,General Counsel andCorporate SecretaryBryan T. DurkinChief Operating OfficerJulie HolzrichterSenior Managing Director,Global OperationsHilda Harris PiellSenior Managing Directorand Chief HumanResources OfficerJames E. ParisiChief Financial OfficerLaurent PaulhacSenior Managing Director,Financial and OTCProducts and ServicesJohn W. PietrowiczSenior Managing Director,Corporate Developmentand FinanceKevin KometerSenior Managing Director andChief Information OfficerKimberly S. TaylorPresident, CME ClearingKendal l. VromanSenior Managing Director,Commodity andInformation Productsand ServicesScot E. WarrenSenior Managing Director,Equity Index Productsand ServicesDerek L. SammannSenior Managing Director,Financial Productsand ServicesLinda D. RichSenior Managing Director,Government Relationsand Legislative AffairsRobert ZagottaSeniorManagingDirector,Products and Services
  • 130. HeadquartersCME Group Inc.20 South Wacker DriveChicago, Illinois 60606312.930.1000 tel312.466.4410 faxwww.cmegroup.cominfo@cmegroup.comInvestor RelationsCME Group Inc.20 South Wacker DriveChicago, Illinois 60606312.930.8491Shareholder RelationsCME Group Inc.20 South Wacker DriveChicago, Illinois 60606312.930.3484Financial ReportsCopies of this report and CME Group’s Annual Reports on Form 10-K, QuarterlyReportsonForm10-QandCurrentReportsonForm8-KarefiledwiththeSecuritiesand Exchange Commission and are available online at www.cmegroup.com, or toshareholders upon written request to Shareholder Relations at the above address.The company is required to file as an exhibit to its 2012 Annual Report on Form10-K a certification under Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 signedby the chief executive officer and the chief financial officer. Copies of thesecertifications are available to shareholders upon written request to ShareholderRelations at the above address.Stock ListingCME Group Class A common stock is listed on The NASDAQ Global SelectMarket under the ticker symbol “CME.” CME Group Class B common stockis not listed on a national securities exchange or traded in an organized over-the-counter market. Each class of Class B common stock is associated withmembership in a specific division of the CME exchange.Transfer AgentComputershare Trust Company, N.A.P.O Box 43078Providence, R.I. 02940312.360.5104(Automated interactive voice response systems are available 24 hours a day.Press zero for live customer support 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Central Time, onany day the U.S. equity markets are open.)www.computershare.com/investorAnnual MeetingThe 2013 Annual Meeting of Shareholders will be held at 3:30 p.m., CentralTime, on Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in the Auditorium at CME Group, located at20 South Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois. All shareholders of record are cordiallyinvited to attend. A formal notice of meeting, proxy statement and proxy havebeen mailed or made available electronically to shareholders of record.Independent Registered Public Accounting FirmErnst & Young LLP155 North Wacker DriveChicago, Illinois 60606corporate CommunicationsCME Group Inc.20 South Wacker DriveChicago, Illinois 60606312.930.3434Customer ServiceFor customer service assistance, call 800.331.3332. Outside the United States,please call 312.930.2316. To provide feedback on customer service at CMEGroup, please call 866.652.1132 or email customerfeedback@cmegroup.com.Corporate GovernanceAt www.cmegroup.com, shareholders can view the company’s corporategovernance principles, charters of all board level committees, the categoricalindependence standards, board of directors code of ethics, employee code ofconduct and the director conflict of interest policy. Copies of these documentsare available to shareholders without charge upon written request to Share-holder Relations at the address listed above.Additional InformationThe Globe logo, CME, CME Group, Chicago Mercantile Exchange, CME Clearing,CME Clearing Europe, CME Europe and Globex are trademarks of ChicagoMercantile Exchange Inc. CBOT and Chicago Board of Trade are trademarksof the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, Inc. NYMEX, New York MercantileExchange, and ClearPort are trademarks of New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc.COMEX is a trademark of Commodity Exchange, Inc. KCBOT, KCBT and KansasCityBoardofTradearetrademarksofTheBoardofTradeofKansasCity,Missouri,Inc. “Dow Jones,” “Dow Jones Industrial Average,” “S&P 500,” and “S&P” areservice marks and/or trademarks of Dow Jones Trademark Holdings LLC, Stan-dard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC, and S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC, as thecase may be, and have been licensed for use by Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.Ibovespa is a registered trademark of BM&FBOVESPA. All other trademarks arethe property of their respective owners. Further information about CME Groupand its products can be found at www.cmegroup.com. Information made avail-able on our website does not constitute a part of this report.Copyright © 2013 CME Group Inc.This report is printed on recycled paper.Company Information
  • 131. LocationsHeadquartersCME Group Inc.20 South Wacker DriveChicago, Illinois 60606312.930.1000 tel312.466.4410 Faxwww.cmegroup.cominfo@cmegroup.comNew YorkNYMEX World HeadquartersWorld Financial CenterOne North End AvenueNew York, New York 10282212.299.2000 tel212.301.4711 FaxBelfastMillennium House 5th Floor17-25 Great Victoria StreetBelfast BT2 7BNUnited Kingdom44.28.9089.6600 tel44.28.9089.6601 FaxHouston1000 Louisiana StreetSuite 3650Houston, Texas 77002713.658.9292 tel713.658.9393 FaxTOKyoLevel 27 Tokyo Sankei Building1-7-2 Otemachi Chiyoda-kuTokyo 100-0004 Japan81.3.3242.6333 tel81.3.3242.6336 Faxasiateam@cmegroup.comLondonFourth FloorOne New ChangeLondon EC4M 9AFUnited Kingdom44.20.3379.3700 tel44.20.7796.7110 Faxeurope@cmegroup.comCalgary#1000, 888 - 3rd St. SWBankers Hall, West TowerCalgary, Alberta,T2P 5C5, Canada403.444.6876 tel403.444.6699 FaxSÃo PauloPraca Antonio Prado, 483rd FloorSão Paulo SP 01010-901Brazil55.11.2565.5999 telcmelateam@cmegroup.comWashington, D.C.Liberty Place325 7th Street, NWSuite 525Washington, D.C. 20004202.638.3838 tel202.638.5799 FaxSingapore50 Raffles Place, #47-01Singapore Land TowerSingapore 04862365.6593.5555 tel65.6593.5575 Faxasiateam@cmegroup.comHong KongLevel 19 Two InternationalFinance Center8 Finance StreetCentral Hong Kong852.2251.1688 tel852.2251.1618 Faxasiateam@cmegroup.comSeoulKyobo Securities Building – Youido10th Floor Kyobo Securities Building26-4 Youido-Dong, Yongdungpo-GuSeoul82.2.6336.6700 tel82.2.6336.6710 Faxasiateam@cmegroup.com