Safety by Design: Soft Guarding

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How to safeguard your machines (Omron STI) Drive for Technology 2010 presentation

How to safeguard your machines (Omron STI) Drive for Technology 2010 presentation

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  • 1. Safety by Design Presented by Jeff Winter
  • 2. Safety By Design  Who is Omron STI?  Why Safeguard?  Wh t rules, laws, and regulations are there? What l l d l ti th ?  Where and how do I start?  What products can help?
  • 3. About Omron STI  We are Omron’s Global Safety Brand  Safety Market Leader in North America  266 Employees  55 Engineers  Omron added Production Capacity from Japan to Fremont for North American market Headquarters & Manufacturing 95,700 sq. ft.
  • 4. Omron STI Provides both Products and Services  30 + years of experience in providing unbiased safety solutions custom designed for your particular application  Large p g product selection  Safety integration services  Global support network
  • 5. Safety By Design  Who is Omron STI?  Why Safeguard?  Wh t rules, laws, and regulations are there? What l l d l ti th ?  Where and how do I start?  What products can help?
  • 6. Why do we need to be Safe?
  • 7. Why Should you Safeguard? Besides the Obvious…… Obvious  There are MANY hidden costs: Compliance Fines Worker’s Comp Insurance Increases Downtime Lost Productivity
  • 8. Safety Productivity
  • 9. Safety By Design  Who is Omron STI?  Why Safeguard?  Wh t rules, laws, and regulations are there? What l l d l ti th ?  Where and how do I start?  What products can help?
  • 10. What does the Law Say? Do your customers NEED to Safeguard?
  • 11. What does the law say about OEMs?  Do I need to apply safety to the machines I am building?  The correct answers is is....... It Depends….. I D d
  • 12. What does it depend on? 1. Where is the machine going? 2. 2 What are the customer’s requests? customer s
  • 13.  Is an ANSI standard the same thing as an OSHA standard or law?  Are you required to follow it?  What happens if you don’t? don t?
  • 14. What is Product Liability?  The responsibility of a manufacturer or vendor of goods to compensate for injury caused by defective merchandise that it has provided for sale.  When individuals are harmed by an unsafe product they may product, have a Cause of Action against the persons who designed, manufactured, sold, or furnished that product  In most jurisdictions, a plaintiff's cause of action may be jurisdictions plaintiff s based on one or more of four different theories: Negligence, breach of Warranty, Misrepresentation, and strict tort liability. Negligence refers to the absence of, or failure to exercise,  i f f f i i proper or ordinary care. It means that an individual who had a legal obligation either omitted to do what should have been g g done or did something that should not have been done.
  • 15.  A new national policy was established on December 29, 1970, when President Richard Nixon signed into law the OSHAct  For employers, the General Duty clause is used by OSHA when there are NO specific standards applicable to a hazard.
  • 16.  OSHA's purpose is to save lives, prevent workplace injuries and illnesses, and protect the health of all America's workers.  Every year:  over 6,000 Americans die from workplace injuries  an estimated 50,000 people die from illnesses caused by workplace chemical exposures  6 million people suffer non-fatal workplace injuries  Injuries alone cost the economy more than $110 billion a year.
  • 17. THE LAW Part 24: 70: 70A: Part Part 70: 70A: Part 70A: Part 70: 70A: Part 70: PartPart 1903: Part 24: PartPart 24: PartPart 24: Part Part 1910: 70A: Part 70A: Part 1901: Part 1902: Procedures for or State Plans for theProceduresProtection of Protection of for or Production Protection of Inspection, Occupational Production or Production Production or Protection of Protection of Part 1919: Protection of for Procedures forProcedures Part 1900: for Procedures the Handling of of Development andIndividual Individual Disclosure Individual Citations, and Handlingand Handling of of Handling of of Disclosure of the Safety Individual Individual of Disclosure the Individual Gear the Disclosure State of State Reserved Information Enforcement Retaliation or in Privacy Proposed RetaliationPrivacy in Privacy in in Information or in Privacy in Privacy Health Retaliation Privacy Certification Information or Information or Retaliation Agreements Standards Complains Materials Records Penalties Complains Records Records Materials Materials StandardsComplains Records Records Records Materials Complains Part 24: 70: 70A: PartPart 24: 70: 70A: Part 70A: Part 70: 70A: Part 70: Part Part 24: 70: 70A: PartPart 24: 70: Part 24: PartPart 24: Part Part Part Part Part 70A: Part 70A: Part 2400: Procedures for Production Production Production or Production or Production or Production or of Procedures for or of Protection of Protection of for Protection Protection of Procedures forProcedures forProcedures Procedures for or Protection Protection of Protection of Regulations the Handling ofHandling ofHandling ofHandling of of Handling of of Handling of of Disclosure Disclosure Disclosure Disclosure Individual Individual Individual Individual the of the of the of Individual Individual the DisclosureIndividual the Disclosure p Implementing g Retaliation Retaliation Retaliation Retaliation Privacy in Privacy in in InformationInformationInformationInformation or in Privacy in Privacy in Privacy in Privacy Information or Information or or or or Retaliation Privacy Retaliation the Privacy Act Complains Complains Complains Complains Records Records Materials Materials Materials Materials Materials Complains Records Records Records Records Records Materials Complains
  • 18. THE LAW Part 1910: p Occupational Safety and Health Standards Subpart A: General S b tA Subpart H: Hazardous S b tH Subpart O: Machinery S b tO Subpart V: Reserved S b tV Materials and Machine Guarding Subpart B: Adoption Subpart I: Personal Subpart P: Hand and Subpart W: Reserved and Extension of Protective Equipment Portable Powered Tools Subpart C: Adoption Established Federal Subpart J: General Subpart Q: Welding, Subpart X: Reserved Standards i of and E t d Extension f Environmental C t l E i t l Controls Cutting, and B i C tti d Brazing Subpart D: Walking- Established Federal Subpart K: Medical and Subpart R: Special Subpart Y: Reserved Standards Working Surfaces First Aid Industries Subpart C: Means of Subpart L: Fire Subpart S: Electrical Subpart Z: Toxic and Egress Protection Hazardous Substances Subpart F: Powered Subpart M: p Subpart T: Commercial p Compressed Gas and Diving Operations Platforms, Manlifts, and Subpart G: Work Platforms Subpart N:Air Compressed Materials Subpart U: Reserved Occupational Health and Equipment Storage Handling and Environment
  • 19. 1910.211-1910.219 1910.211: Definitions 1910.212: General Requirements for all Machinery Point of Operation is Defined All cracked saws shall be removed from service. 1910.213: Woodworking machinery requirements 1910.214: Cooperage Machinery - Reserved All abrasive wheels shall be mounted between flanges which shall not be less than one-third 1910.215: Abrasive Wheel Machinery Subpart O: Machinery the diameter of the wheel. and Machine Guarding emergency switches shall not be of All trip and 1910.216: Mills and Calenders in the rubber the automatically resetting type, but shall and plastics industries require manual resetting. 1910.217: Mechanical Power Presses A pad with a nonslip contact area shall be firmly attached to the pedal. 1910.216: 1910 216: Forging Machines 1910.216: Mechanical power-transmission apparatus
  • 20. For those hard of seeing: JUST manufacturing $63,359,935
  • 21. General Overview 1910.212 (a)(1): One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine p p p y area from hazards such as those created by point of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips, and sparks. 1910.212(a)(3): The guarding device shall be in conformity with any appropriate standards therefor, or, in the absence of applicable specific standards, shall be so designed and standards, constructed as to prevent the operator from having any part of his body in the danger zone during the operating cycle.”
  • 22. What happens if I don’t don t follow?  Serious  up to $7000 per violation  Other than Serious  discretionary but not more than $7000  Repeat  up to $70,000 per violation  Willful  up to $70,000 per violation  Violations resulting in death- further penalties g p  Failure to abate  $7000/day
  • 23. The problem with OSHA…. Open for interpretation…. Find X. X 3cm 4cm
  • 24. How do you PROVE you are Safe? ANSI NFPA RIA UL Follow a recognized standard to demonstrate your compliance
  • 25. ANSI Standards  American National Standards Institute (ANSI) are voluntary standards developed by experts in the industry. ind str  ANSI standards are detailed, technical , documents that provide rules, guidelines or characteristics for a product or process.  ANSI standards explain the hazards involved in operating machinery
  • 26. Voluntary Standards & The General voluntary standard Clause establish the Dutystandards typical If OSHA determines that compliance with the OSHA would have prevented or lessened the severity of an injury,employers must general standards OSHA may cite g p y A An the th temployer’s failure to l ll but standard OSHA l d’ meet without specifying how.d as a ANSI standard is d i f not t law, b t can become il t a follow the t d b f th violation of the general duty clause. to decide gives the employer discretion mandatory! how best to achieve the standard’s  This happens through aBut OSHA called “incorporation goals process ( and the courts ) do goals. incorporation through reference”say how they EXPECT employers to a when an OSHA standard cites specific ANSI standard. discretion provided by the use the standard  You can be cited for not following voluntary standards!  OSHA may cite you for not following a standard like NFPA 70E even though it is not incorporated into OSHA.
  • 27. ANSI B11 Safety Standards y ANSI B11.22 - Turning Machines AMT EHS - Environmental Health and Safety ANSI B11.23 - Milling, Drilling and Boring Machines ANSI B11 ASC - Accredited Standards Committee ANSI B11.24 - Safety Requirements for Transfer Machines ANSI B11.1 - Mechanical Power Presses ANSI B11.TR1-2004 - Ergonomic Guidelines B11.TR1 2004 ANSI B11 2 - H dra lic Po er Presses B11.2 Hydraulic Power ANSI B11.TR2-1997 - Mist Control Considerations ANSI B11.3 - Mechanical Power Press Brakes ANSI B11.TR3-2000 - Risk Assessment and Risk Reduction ANSI B11.4 - Shears ANSI B11.TR4-2004 - Selection of PES/PLC) for Machine Tools ANSI B11.5 - Ironworkers ANSI B11.TR5-2006 - Sound Level Measurement Guideline ANSI B11.6 - Lathes ANSI B11.TR6-200X - Control Reliable Circuits ANSI B11.7 - Cold Headers and Cold Formers ANSI B11.TR7-2007 - Lean Manufacturing ANSI B11.8 - Drilling, Milling, and Boring Machines ANSI B15.1-2000 - Mechanical Power Transmission Apparatus ANSI B11.9 - Grinding Machines ANSI B65.1-2005 - Printing Press Systems ANSI B11.10 - Sawing Machines ANSI B65.2-2005 - Binding and Finishing Systems ANSI B11.11 - Gear and Spline Cutting Machines ANSI B65.3-2001 - Guillotine Paper Cutters, Mill Trimmers ANSI B11.12 - Roll-Forming and Roll-Bending Machines ANSI B65.4-2002 - Three Knife Trimmers B65 4 2002 Three-Knife ANSI B11.13 - Chucking Machines ANSI B65.5-2006 - Stand-Alone Platen Presses ANSI B11.14 - Coil Slitting Machines ANSI B151.27 - Plastics Machinery Robots ANSI B11.15 - Pipe, Tube, and Shape Bending Machines ANSI B155.1-2006 - Packaging Machinery ANSI B11.16 - Powder/Metal Compacting Presses ANSI B56.5 - Industrial Vehicles ANSI B11.17 - Horizontal Hydraulic Extrusion Presses ANSI/ASSE Z244.1 - Control of Hazardous Energy gy ANSI B11.18 - Plate From Coiled Configuration B11 18 ANSI/RIA R15.06 - Industrial Robots and Robot Systems ANSI B11.19 - Performance Criteria for Safeguarding ANSI/RIA TR R15.106 - Teaching Multiple Robots ANSI B11.20 - Integrated Manufacturing Systems ANSI/RIA TR R15.206 -Guidelines for Implementing ANSI B11.21 - Lasers for Processing Materials
  • 28. Safety By Design  Who is Omron STI?  Why Safeguard?  Wh t rules, laws, and regulations are there? What l l d l ti th ?  Where and how do I start?  What products can help?
  • 29. S So………What should I do to safeguard my Wh h ld d f d machine?
  • 30. ANSWER: Review Applicable Standards and Conduct an Assessment
  • 31. What is it?  Risk Assessment The process by which the intended use of the machine, the tasks and hazards, and the level of risk are determined  Risk Reduction The application of protective measures to reduce the risk to a tolerable level
  • 32. Why do a risk assessment?  To create a safer working environment for employees (as required by OSHA)  To reduce costs  To comply with national and international consensus standards, including: ANSI B11.TR3-2000 – Risk Assessment and Risk Reduction – A Guide to Estimate, Evaluate and Reduce Risks Associated with Machine Tools ANSI/RIA R15.06-1999 – For Industrial Robots and Robot Systems – Safety Requirements ANSI/NFPA 79-2007 – Electrical Standard for Industrial Machinery ANSI/ASSE Z244.1-2003 – Control of Hazardous Energy – Lockout/Tagout and Alternative Methods ANSI/PMMI B155.1-2006 – Standard for Packaging Machinery and Packaging-Related Converting Machinery – Safety Requirements for Construction, Care, and Use CSA Z432-04 – Safeguarding of Machinery – Occupational Health and Safety CSA Z434-03 – Industrial Robots and Robot Systems – General Safety Requirements CSA Z460-05 – Control of Hazardous Energy – Lockout and Other Methods EN 1050:1996 / ISO 14121:1999 – Safety of machinery – Principles of risk assessment EN 954-1:2000 / ISO 13849-1:1999 – Safety of machinery – Safety-related parts of control systems – Part 1: General principles of design ISO 12100-1:2003 – Safety of machinery – Basic Concepts, general principles for design – Part 1: Basic terminology, methodology ISO 12100-2:2003 – Safety of machinery – Basic Concepts, general principles for design – Part 2: Technical principles
  • 33. How do I do it?  Pick a standard to follow follo ANSI, CSA, ISO  Y can create your own process, as l You t long as it’s based on industry best practices  You can conduct the process in house, house request it from your OEM, or contract an outside service provider
  • 34. Risk Assessment Matrix from ANSI/RIA R15.06-1999 Table 2 Severity of Exposure Exposure Avoidance Risk Reduction Category E2 Frequent A2 Not Likely R1 S2 S i I j Serious Injury Exposure A1 Likely R2A More than E1 Infrequent A2 Not Likely R2B First-aid Exposure A1 Likely R2B E2 Frequent A2 Not Likely R2C S1 Slight Injury Exposure A1 Likely R3A First-aid E1 Infrequent A2 Not Likely R3B Exposure A1 Likely R4 Table 2 - Risk reduction decision matrix prior to safeguard selection p g
  • 35. Risk Reduction Measures from ANSI/RIA R15.06-1999 Table 3 Category SafeGuard Performance Circuit Performance Hazard Elimination or hazard substitution Control Reliable (4.5.4) R1 (9.5.1) Engineering controls preventing acess to Control Reliable (4.5.4) R2A the hazard, or stopping the hazard (9.5.2), e.g. interlocked barrier guards, light Single Channel with monitoring (4.5.3) R2B curtains, curtains safety mats or other presence mats, sensing devices (10.4) Single Channel (4.5.2) R2C Single Channel (4.5.2) R3A Non interlocked barriers, clearance, , , procedures and equipment (9.5.3) Simple (4.5.1) R3B Awareness means (9.5.4) Simple (4.5.1) R4 Table 3 - Safeguard Selection Matrix
  • 36. If there are Hazards, there MUST be Risk Reduction PROTECTIVE MEASURE EXAMPLES This can only be Most Effective Eliminate human interaction in the process Elimination or Substitution done by the OEM Eliminate pinch points (increase clearance) Automated material handling (robots, conveyors, etc.) Barriers Engineering Controls Interlocks (Safeguarding Technology / Presence sensing devices (light curtains, safety mats, area scanners, etc.) Protective Devices) Two hand control and two hand trip devices So what is the Awareness Means Lights, beacons, and strobes Computer warnings difference between These 3 rely y Signs and labels Beepers, horns, and sirens these 3 sections? Training and Procedures on human Safe work procedures Safety equipment inspections (Administrative Controls) Training Lockout / Tagout / Tryout behavior! Safety glasses and face shields Personal Protective Equipment Ear plugs (PPE) Gloves Protective footwear Least Effective Respirators Hierarchy of Control
  • 37. If there are Hazards, there MUST be Risk Reduction PROTECTIVE MEASURE EXAMPLES Most Effective Eliminate human interaction in the process Elimination or Substitution Eliminate pinch points (increase clearance) Automated material handling (robots, conveyors, etc.) Barriers Engineering Controls Interlocks (Safeguarding Technology / Presence sensing devices (light curtains, safety mats, area scanners, etc.) Protective Devices) Two hand control and two hand trip devices Lights, beacons, and strobes Awareness Means Computer warnings Signs and labels Beepers, horns, and sirens Safe work procedures Training and Procedures Safety equipment inspections (Administrative Controls) Training Lockout / Tagout / Tryout Safety glasses and face shields Personal Protective Equipment Ear plugs (PPE) Gloves Protective footwear Least Effective Respirators Hierarchy of Control
  • 38. What do you think the number of machines we conducted 10 000 10,000 Risk Assessments on were guarded correctly? 7% Their current guards proved to be a waste of time and money when done incorrectly!
  • 39. If You don’t………..
  • 40. What are Hazards on a Machine or Process? • Physical • Electrical • Falling / Moving Objects • Fl h Flashover and B d Burns • Collisions • Electrocution • Collapsing Structures • Wrong Connection / Loose Connection • Chemical • Mechanical / Process • Explosion • Pinch Points or Entanglement • Fire • Abrasion, Grinding, Abrasion Grinding Cutting • Toxic Material Release • Thermal • Wrong mix of chemicals • Pressure Releasing Effects (Bursting Vessels, • Radiation Jets of Gas or Liquids) • Welding Torches, Gases etc. Hazards are physical objects or chemical substances that have the potential f causing h t ti l for i harm t people, property or the environment to l t th i t
  • 41. What methods for machine safety are there?  Guards  Location/distance  fixed  interlocked  Feeding and ejection methods  adjustable  automatic and/or semi- semi  self-adjusting automatic feed and ejection  Devices  robots  presence sensing  pullback  Miscellaneous aids  restraint  awareness barriers  safety controls (tripwire cable,  protective shields two-hand control, etc.)  hand-feeding tools  gates
  • 42. What methods for machine safety are there?  Guards  Location/distance  fixed  interlocked  Feeding and ejection methods  adjustable  automatic and/or semi- semi  self-adjusting automatic feed and ejection  Devices  robots  presence sensing  pullback  Miscellaneous aids  restraint  awareness barriers  safety controls (tripwire cable,  protective shields two-hand control, etc.)  hand-feeding tools  gates
  • 43. What methods for machine safety are there?  Guards  Location/distance  fixed  interlocked  Feeding and ejection methods  adjustable  automatic and/or semi- semi  self-adjusting automatic feed and ejection  Devices  robots  presence sensing  pullback  Miscellaneous aids  restraint  awareness barriers  safety controls (tripwire cable,  protective shields two-hand control, etc.)  hand-feeding tools  gates
  • 44. Safety Distance Formula From ANSI/RIA R15.06-1999 Annex B
  • 45. Otherwise……
  • 46. Safe Mounting Distance Formula Total Stopping Time Ds = K(Ts) + Dpf Hand Safe Speed Depth Mounting M ti Constant Penetration P t ti Distance 63 inc/sec Factor
  • 47. Safety By Design  Who is Omron STI?  Why Safeguard?  Wh t rules, laws, and regulations are there? What l l d l ti th ?  Where and how do I start?  What products can help?
  • 48. Products used to safeguard
  • 49. MS4800 – T Two B Box  All models can be cascaded  Cascade up to 4 p segments (256 beams max)  Key features: IBI’s – easy to align, diagnostics
  • 50. F3SJ – Two Box  You pick the resolution  You pick the height  Cascadable  Key features: Sophisticated muting – single beam bi beam, bi- directional, outputs can be modified via offline editor
  • 51. Light Curtain Accessories  EP Enclosures available for protected heights of 10” to 48 48”  IP67 enclosures - 10” to 82”
  • 52. Interlock Switches: Three Basic Categories  Traditional mechanical switch  Non Contact  Solenoid-locking  D I need a monitoring relay? Do d it i l ?
  • 53. D4NS Compact Plastic Door Switch  O ti Optional metal l t l operation head  9 different conduit entrances / M12 connector  6 different internal switch configurations Up to 3 contacts p  Key feature: 20% - 30% lower price than non-OSTI brands OSTI b d
  • 54. D4GL Keyed Solenoid Door Switch  Si il to new D4NL, Similar t D4NL features “in-line” construction  up t 3 sets of safety to t f f t contacts and 2 solenoid monitoring contacts  k h ldi key holding fforce of 1000N f  metal operation head  Key feature: 20% - 30% lower price than non-OSTI brands
  • 55. AA-43 D4GL-SK10-LK  Solenoid locking switch and integral slide bolt  LEDs for open/close/locked  Integral lock-out key  Up to 5 contacts  Power to lock or power to unlock  24 Vdc only  No rear release
  • 56. D40A/G9SX-NS Compact Non-Contact Door Switch/ Flexible Safety Unit
  • 57. Advantage over Magnetic Switches Competitor’s 6 units max (w/LED) D40A-(Up D40A (Up to 30 units w/LED )
  • 58. Advantage over Magnetic Switches On machines with a lot of doors, it is difficult to know which d hi h door i opened. is d Solution Even half-opened door is indicated by Auxiliary output + - Yellow line is Auxiliary output Signal Signal
  • 59. Safety Mats  UMQ Quick Disconnect now available  Send us your drawings to ensure proper dimensions di i  Key features – durable, easy to configure
  • 60. You give us this
  • 61. We give you this
  • 62. OS3101: New and Improved  Key features:  Very easy to p g y y program  LED sector indicators  Diagnostic display g p y  Now has multiple zones
  • 63. OptoShield Operating Principle D = (c x T)/2 Distance to object determined by the “time of flight” of the light pulse.
  • 64. OptoShield Operating Principle Pulses sent out in 180o
  • 65. Screen Layout Menu Bar Tool Bar Info Bar Warning Zone Safety Zone
  • 66. NE1A Programmable Safety Modern network safety technology Controller easily segment an makes it possible to instantly safety- stop a machine, application Safetysafety zones or  Intelligent into Network Controller quickly1.diagnose a safety device  Safety Logic functionality  2. DeviceNet Safety Master Functionality  3. DeviceNet Slave Functionality  4. Local safety I/O  Easy Programming  Safety based function Block  Program Size: Max 128 Function Blocks  Logic Editor contained within Configuration Software  Local Safety and Slave I/O  Password Security  USB Port for Programming  Global Safety Standards
  • 67. 2) Through the Logic Program ) g g g FAULT!
  • 68. Questions?