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Re-Defining Agriculture to Build Consumer Trust

Re-Defining Agriculture to Build Consumer Trust

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  • Consumer choice
  • Some are suggesting we turn back the clock … that we produce food using farming methods from the “good old days.”
  • In 1950 there were 154-million people and 5.6-million farms in the United States. A single farmer produced enough in one year to feed 30 people.  In 2009, there were an estimated 305-million people and 2-million farms in the United States. A single farmer produced enough in one year to feed 140 people.  If the U.S. today relied on the farmers of 1950 to produce their food, 151 million people would go hungry.  151-million is the combined populations of the 9 largest states in the U.S. (California, Texas, New York, Florida, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, and Georgia). Taking into consideration there are only 2 million farms in the U.S. today (compared to 5.6 million in 1950), using 1950s technology would produce enough food for only 54 million people (the combined population of California and Texas). http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0004986.htmlSource: American Farm Bureau, Census Bureau
  • In 1950 there were 154-million people and 5.6-million farms in the United States. A single farmer produced enough in one year to feed 30 people.  In 2009, there were an estimated 305-million people and 2-million farms in the United States. A single farmer produced enough in one year to feed 140 people.  If the U.S. today relied on the farmers of 1950 to produce their food, 151 million people would go hungry.  151-million is the combined populations of the 9 largest states in the U.S. (California, Texas, New York, Florida, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, and Georgia). Taking into consideration there are only 2 million farms in the U.S. today (compared to 5.6 million in 1950), using 1950s technology would produce enough food for only 54 million people (the combined population of California and Texas).Source: American Farm Bureau, US Census Bureau
  • Est. U.S. population in 1950 – 154,000,000Est. U.S. population in 2009 - 305,000,000Source: Census Bureau
  • The public’s increased concern on where their food comes from provides the food system the opportunity to look in the mirror and tell our story.
  • Source: University of Missouri Commercial Ag Swine Team, Ray Massey
  • Compared to 1950 we produce 4.3 times more corn on only 11% more acres. Source: USDA/ERS1950 – 3 billion bushels of corn on 72 million acres2009 – 13 billion bushels of corn on 80 million acres
  • Source: Monterey County Annual Crop Report
  • Lettuce1950 – 59,500 acres, 11,686,387 cartons, 185 cartons/acre2008 – 153,500 acres, 136,481,000 cartons, 889 cartons/acreSource: Monterey County Annual Crop Report, 2007 and 1950Carton = 40 lbs or approx 24 head of iceberg lettuceReasons for increased yields:-Better pest control-Better geneticsTomatoes1950 – 13,500 acres, 202,500 tons, 15 tons per acre2008 – 37,000 acres, 1,529,000 tons, 41.3 tons/acreSource: Yolo County 2008 Agricultural Crop Report, Yolo County 2008 Agricultural Crop ReportTons delivered to the canning plantBetter plant genetics. New varieties have much higher yield potential.Mechanical harvesting more efficient than the hand-harvesting of 1950Better pest control. Irrigation practices drastically better now than 60 years ago.
  • Source: USDA/NASS1950 – 58,954,000,000 eggs from an average of 349,439,000 hens2009 – 90,359,000,000 eggs from an average of 337,376,000 hens
  • Source: USDA/NASS1950 – 300 million bushels on 14 million acres (22 bushels/acre)2009 – 3.3 billion bushels on 76 million acres (44 bushels/acre)
  • Source: USDA/NAS1950 – 1 billion bushels on 62 million acres (17 bushels/acre)2009 – 2.2 billion bushels on 50 million acres (44 bushels/acre)
  • 1950 – 22,000,000 cows produced 116,000 thousand pounds of milk at a rate of 5,300 pounds/cow2009 – 9,200,000 cows produced 189,300 thousand pounds of milk at a rate of 20,500 pounds/cowTo produce that much milk at 1950 rates would take 35,600 cows. Four times as many cows.1950 – 344,500 square miles were devoted to dairy. http://www.dairyfarmingtoday.org/DairyFarmingToday/Learn-More/FAQ/
  • Source: USDA taken from “Food Economics and Consumer Choice,” Jeff Simmons, Elanco
  • USDA/ERShttp://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/FoodSecurity/Food Research and Action CenterDuring the 2008-09 school year, 31.2 million children participated in the National School Lunch Program through more than 101,000 schools and residential child care institutions. On a typical school day, 19.4 million of these 31.2 million total participants were receiving free or reduced price lunches.http://www.frac.org/html/federal_food_programs/programs/nslp.htmlUSA Today, June 2009In New York City, which has the nation's largest school system, 73% of students received free or discount lunches this year, up from 71% in 2007-2008. In Chicago, participation jumped to 84.3% from 82% in 2007-2008 and 75% the year before. Dade County, Fla., schools saw a 3.8% jump, to 66.7%. http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2009-06-10-schoollunchinside_N.htm
  • 1 billion food insecure globally11 million food insecure in the U.S.
  • Source: U.S. Census Bureau, “World Vital Events Per Time Unit: 2010”75.4 million represents births minus deaths.
  • Source: U.S. Census Bureau, “World Vital Events Per Time Unit: 2010”75.4 million represents births minus deaths.6.3 million represents births minus deaths.6.3 million is the approximate combined populations of LA and Chicago.
  • Source: U.S. Census Bureau, “World Vital Events Per Time Unit: 2010”206,500 represents births minus deaths.Philadelphia population = 1.54 million1.54 million X 7 = 1.44 million
  • Doubling agricultural output by 2050, while freezing agriculture’s environmental footprint, will require growing the Total Factor Productivity (TFP - the output per unit of total resources employed in production) to at least 1.75 percent annually from the current 1.4 percent. Not only will we need to raise the average rate of TFP growth by one-fourth above its present rate to close the gap, but also productivity will need to grow even more rapidly during the next two decades, when demand will be increasing faster before leveling off by 2050. The primary lever for raising TFP growth is by increasing investments in science and technology. http://www.globalharvestinitiative.org/documents/GAP%20Report.pdf
  • Source: “How to feed the World in 2050?” by Hartwig de Haen/UN FAO

Stop Playing Not to Lose and Start Playing to Win Stop Playing Not to Lose and Start Playing to Win Presentation Transcript

  • Stop Playing Not to Lose and Start Playing to Win
    Re-defining Agriculture to Build Consumer Trust
    Charlie Arnot
    Charlie.Arnot@Foodintegrity.org
    www.foodintegrity.org
    www.bestfoodfacts.org
  • CFI Mission
    To build consumer trust and confidence in today’s food system by…
    sharing accurate, balanced information
    correcting misinformation
    modeling best practices and
    engaging stakeholders
  • CFI Vision
    To provide leadership in building public understanding and support that producing the food we need using fewer resources through responsible production, processing and distribution is the ethical choice that is right for people, animals and the planet.
  • Three Strategic Platforms
    Building trust through shared values communication
    Redefining today’s food system as the ethical choice for people, animals and the planet
    Supporting choice
  • Building Consumer Trust
  • Freedom to Operate
    Earning and Maintaining the Social License(Sapp/CMA)
    Freedom to Operate
  • Social License
    Earning and Maintaining the Social License(Sapp/CMA)
  • Social License
    Definition: The privilege of operating with minimal formalized restrictions (legislation, regulation, or market requirements) based on maintaining public trust by doing what’s right.
    Public Trust: A belief that activities are consistent with social expectations and the values of the community and other stakeholders.
  • The Social License To Operate
    Flexible Responsive Lower Cost
    Rigid Bureaucratic Higher Cost
    Tipping
    Point
    Social License
    • Ethics
    • Values
    • Expectations
    • Self regulation
    Social Control
    • Regulation
    • Legislation
    • Litigation
    • Compliance
    Single triggering event Cumulative impact
  • Earning and Maintaining the Social License(Sapp/CMA)
    Social License
    Freedom to Operate
  • Trust
    Earning and Maintaining the Social License(Sapp/CMA)
    Trust
    Social License
    Freedom to Operate
  • Earning and Maintaining the Social License(Sapp/CMA)
    Confidence
    Trust
    Value Similarity
    Social License
    Competence
    Freedom to Operate
    Influential Others
    Trust research was published in December, 2009 – Journal of Rural Sociology
  • Skills
    Shared Values
    What drives Consumer Trust?
    Shared values are 3-5X more important in building trust than demonstrating competence
    Trust research was published in December, 2009 – Journal of Rural Sociology
  • What Does It Mean?
    “They don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care!”
    - Theodore Roosevelt
  • Questions of Values and Ethics Kohlberg’s Moral Hierarchy
    Three Levels – Six Stages
    Pre- Conventional
    • Direct impact on me
    Conventional
    • Societal expectations
    Post-Conventional
    • Principle driven
    Lawrence Kohlberg, 1927 - 1987
  • Questions of Values and Ethics Kohlberg’s Moral Hierarchy
    Universal ethical principle orientation
    We have an ethical obligation to our employees, our animals, the environment, our customers and our communities
    Post Conventional Principle driven
    Social contract orientation
    The “law & order” orientation
    We comply with all environmental and employment laws and regulations
    Conventional Societal expectations
    The “good boy / nice girl” orientation
    Personal rewards orientation
    We take care of our land and animals because that’s when we get the best ROI
    Pre-Conventional Direct impact on me
    Punishment-Obedience
  • Questions of Values and Ethics Kohlberg’s Moral Hierarchy
    Universal ethical principle orientation
    NGO’s
    Post Conventional Principle driven
    Social contract orientation
    The “law & order” orientation
    Conventional Societal expectations
    The “good boy / nice girl” orientation
    Business
    Personal rewards orientation
    Pre-Conventional Direct impact on me
    Punishment-Obedience
  • Sustainable Balance
    Economically Viable
    • ROI
    • Demand
    • Cost Control
    • Productivity
    • Efficiency
    Profitability
    Scientifically Verified
    • Data Driven
    • Repeatable
    • Measurable
    • Specific
    Objectivity
    Scientifically Verified
    Economically Viable
    Sustainable Systems
    Knowledge
    Knowledge
    Ethically Grounded
    Ethically Grounded
    • Compassion
    • Responsibility
    • Respect
    • Fairness
    • Truth
    Value Similarity
    Feelings
    Belief
  • Consumer Perception
    The public senses change in the way food is produced but does not understand
    Lack of understanding creates opportunity for activists and detractors
    The food system must engage in value based communication that is ethically grounded, scientifically verified and economically viable to build trust in today’s systems
  • Animal Welfare
    • Values: The proper care of animals is very important to me. My family and I have an ethical obligation to make sure the animals on our farm are well cared for.
    • Science: That’s why we use the latest technology on the farm to keep our animals comfortable, protected from disease, predators and the elements, and fed a well-balanced diet for optimal health.
    • Economics: Treating my animals with the best care allows my family and me to help provide consumers with abundant, safe and affordable food, and allows me to make a living so I can provide for my family.
  • 2009 Consumer Trust Qualitative Research
    Summary Slides
    This information is wholly owned by CMA and licensed to CFI; Study was conducted by Gestalt Inc.
  • Thank You to the 2009 Consumer Trust Research Sponsors
  • CFI Annual Consumer Trust Survey
    Qualitative research in 2009 study
    “What will cause consumers to grant more social license?”
    Eight consumer focus groups
    April 2: Des Moines, IA
    April 7: Syracuse, NY
    April 8: Nashville, TN
    April 13: Fresno, CA
  • Two Observations
    Uninterested and uninformed.
    "Give me safe food, and I will trust you to give me safe food. I will trust you (farmers) until you do something to break that trust.“ – Connie, Nashville focus group
    “They could let us know more about what they do… I’ve never been on a farm, I don’t know what they do.” – Judy, Des Moines group
    Trust farmers but aren’t sure contemporary production is still farming.
    "Large producers are about the money and rushing production with antibiotics… Small farmers are concerned about their name…“ – Consuela, Nashville focus group
    "There is a difference: a farmer grows and sells locally with ethics, whereas commercial producers are all about the paycheck.“ – Maria, Nashville focus group
  • The Challenge
    Building trust and confidence in the contemporary food system among a public that is largely uninterested and uninformed.
    The contemporary food system is not perceived as being consistent with the understanding or values of consumers or with the positive attributes historically assigned to farmers.
    Voices questioning current food system practices are increasing in number, volume and impact.
  • Times Have Changed
    “It is not the strongest species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the ones who are most responsive to change.”
    - Charles Darwin
  • National Discussion
    “A long-overdue national conversation about food so far hasn’t been much of a conversation. Instead, what we have are two armed camps deeply suspicious of one another shouting past each other.”
    - Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times, Jan. 2010
  • Is This The Ethical Choice?
  • 1950
    U.S. population 154 million
    5.6 million farms
    One farmer produced enough to feed 30 people
    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Farm Bureau
  • 2010
    U.S. population 308 million
    2 million farms
    One farmer produced enough to feed 155 people
    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Farm Bureau
  • Then and Now
    If the number of farms and level of productivity remained constant since1950, there would be no food for anyone in the following states.
  • Then and Now
    151 Million People
    9 Most Populous US States
    California
    Texas
    New York
    Florida
    Illinois
    Pennsylvania
    Ohio
    Michigan
    Georgia
  • Heightened Public Interest
    The public has a right to expect farmers, food companies, restaurants and grocery stores to act in a responsible manner.
    New public interest about food provides the U.S. food system the opportunity to:
    1. Look in the mirror …
    2. Tell our story …
  • BLT and a Glass of Milk
  • Pork
    Compared to 1950 we produce 176%
    more pork per sow with 44% fewer sows
    “Because we take care of our animals the way that we do, we pride ourselves in supplying a safe, nutritious, affordable food product .”
    - Kenny Brinker, Missouri hog farmer
  • Corn
    Primary ingredient in feed for pork production as well as poultry and cattle
  • Corn
    Compared to 1950 we produce 333% more corn on 11% more acres
    “My proper care and husbandry of the soil and the crop, allows me to look forward to passing it on to the next generation, either my daughters or other relatives, to keep producing the food that we do for the world."
    - Kurt Stiefvater, South Dakota corn farmer
  • Lettuce & Tomatoes
  • Lettuce Monterey County, California
    Compared to 1950…
    12 times the production
    2.5 times the land
    Tomatoes
    Yolo County, California
    8 times the production
    3 times the land
  • Lettuce & Tomatoes
    “We love being able to supply our state with healthy, fresh, and safe vegetables.”
    - Jason Ruhlig, Michigan vegetable farmer
  • Mayonnaise
    Eggs
    Soybean Oil
  • Eggs
    Compared to 1950, we produce 53% more eggs
    with 3% fewer hens
    “Our family is committed to making safe and affordable food in a responsible way. We want our customers to feel good when they consume our product knowing how much care is given to each dozen eggs.” - Harry Herbruck, Michigan egg farmer
  • Soybeans
    • Oil used in food production, i.e. mayonnaise
    • Meal used in livestock feed
  • Soybeans
    Compared to 1950, we produce 11 times more
    soybeans on 5 times the acres
    “We know the challenges of a growing population in the world and our farm is going to be a part of producing food for that population.” - Vicki Coughlin, Wisconsin, soybean farmer
  • Bread
  • Bread
    Compared to 1950 we produce 69% more wheat
    on 6% fewer acres
    “It’s a good feeling to provide food, fuel and fiber for
    others worldwide.” - Chet Edinger, South Dakota wheat farmer
  • Milk
  • Milk
    Compared to 1950 we produce 63% more milk
    with 58% fewer cows
    “Everything we do is for the health and safety of our cows and the quality product that ends up on the grocery story shelf.” - Stephanie Dykshorn, Iowa dairy farmer
  • Surely this means we can meet the world’s growing demand for food …RIGHT?
    Source: USDA
  • Record High Food Insecurity
    14.6 percent of U.S. households were food insecure in 2008, up from 11.1 percent in 2007.
    Highest recorded rate since 1995 (the first national food security survey).
    Approximately 60% of the 30 million children who participate in the National School Lunch Program receive free or reduced-price meals.
    (NYC 73%, Chicago 84%, Dade Co. 67%)
    Source: USDA-ERS/FRAC/USA Today
  • Food Affordability
    Source: USDA-ERS
  • 1 billion
    11 million
    1 billion
    11 million
    Source: United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, 2008
  • And by mid-century,
    the world will be home to
    3+ billion more people.
  • Global Population Increases …
    75.4 Million Annually
    Population of Iran
    Source: U.S. Census Bureau
  • Global Population Increases …
    6.3 Million Monthly
    Los Angeles
    Chicago
    Source: U.S. Census Bureau
  • Global Population Increases …
    206,500 Daily
    Another Philadelphia
    Every Week
    Source: U.S. Census Bureau
  • In 40 years, the world will need 100% more food than we produce today.
    Source: Science Magazine, 2005
  • The Need for More
    “…The world has the technology to feed, on a sustainable basis, 10 billion people. The pertinent question today is whether farmers and ranchers will be permitted to use this technology.”
    — Norman Borlaug, 2000
  • “By almost any measure, producing food has the
    largest impact of any human activity. Most estimates suggest that we will need to produce twice as many calories on the same amount of land we use today if we want to maintain biodiversity and ecosystem functions.”
    - Jason Clay, World Wildlife Fund
  • Closing the Gap
    1.4%
    Source: Global Harvest Initiative – 2010 GAP Report
  • Closing the Gap
    1.75%
    GAP Index TM
    1.4%
    Source: Global Harvest Initiative – 2010 GAP Report
  • Closing the Gap
    1.75%
    300 Million People
    GAP Index TM
    1.4%
    Source: Global Harvest Initiative – 2010 GAP Report
  • Growth Limitations
    80% of future production growth must come from increased yields- responsible use of innovation & technology
    10-15% could be achieved from higher cropping density
    5-10% from expansion of land use
    Source: UN FAO
  • Three Things You Can Do
  • Engage Consumers and Support Choice
    Choice is good
    Americans have the most affordable food in the world
    1908 – 50% of income
    Today - <10%
    The public has a right to expect the food system to act in a responsible manner
  • Learn More about your Food and Understand the Consequences of Policy and Market Decisions
    Decisions have consequences
    Decisions that limit our ability to increase productivity will result in increased hunger in the US, around the world and for future generations
  • The Ethical Choice
    Support responsible, food production systems that allow us to produce the food we need using fewer resources to meet the growing global demand for food.
  • It’s the ethical choice for people,
    animals and the planet
  •  
  • Stop Playing Not to Lose and Start Playing to Win
    Re-defining Agriculture to Build Consumer Trust
    Charlie Arnot
    Charlie.Arnot@Foodintegrity.org
    www.foodintegrity.org
    www.bestfoodfacts.org