Groundwater Protection: Sustainability in the Face of Development
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Groundwater Protection: Sustainability in the Face of Development

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Illinois Section American Water Works Association Annual Conference and Expo Presentation

Illinois Section American Water Works Association Annual Conference and Expo Presentation

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  • We live on a water planet
  • Where the water cycle supports all life and shapes weather, seasons, and climate
  • Providing habitat for all living things
  • One person in six lives without regular access to safe drinking water; over twice that number—2.4 billion—lack access to adequate sanitation.” (2) Each year more than five million people die from water-related disease. (3) The World Health Organization states that 1.8 million children die every year as a result of diseases caused by unclean water and sanitation.  (4)
  • The Ministry of Health and Water Experts Committee of China Professor of Military Medical Sciences Mr Liangzenghui said In the "Healthy Times" published an article:With the development of Industry,the pollution of Drinking water war become more and more serious around the world.Before 1950s, the main source of water contamination by pathogenic micro-organisms, causing cholera, typhoid, hepatitis A outbreak.IN the mid of 20th Century,the water was polluted by Heavy Metal.In the nearly 20 years,the organic pollution of water become increasingly serious,and  109 species of carcinogenic substances are detected in water. According to the national range,Pathogenic microorganisms,eavy metals and organic are the three polluted substances that exist in water,the problem of healthy drinking water are serious.In the whole country,more than 900,000,000 are drinking the exceeded polluted water.
  • In McHenry County, aquifers are the only source of drinking water, and contamination and overuse of those aquifers are concerns to local residents. With growth, both the potential for contamination and the amount of groundwater extraction increase. As more people move to the county, greater demands are placed on water resources, and groundwater management and protection have become complex issues that demand action. With a growing county, such as McHenry, many residents have relocated here from somewhere else, like Chicago. Because of this, many residents don’t realize that their drinking water is from Groundwater. Many are used to their drinking water coming from Lake Michigan. They are used to seeing the lake as an endless resource. Don’t realize that G.W. (and lake water) are limited resources.
  • Population Grows, Water Supply never does. Unfortunately, people not spread evenly over county. Also talk about how projections depend on decisions communities make about their growth, land use planning for sustainable water use
  • This model is being used in Kane County, Lake County, by the 11 County RWSPG, and by the states of Texas, California, Florida, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington. Integrated Water Resources Planning process is used to create a shared vision among the stakeholders involved in water supply planning. For more information on this planning process, please refer to the research paper entitled Integrated Water Resource Planning (Palmer and Lundberg 2003)
  • In Illinois, with the absence of statutory authority, counties are unable to enforce groundwater ordinances in areas other than the unincorporated. Utilized a multi-governmental effort to “unify” approaches to conserving and protecting our water resources. To facilitate stakeholder engagement in groundwater issues and related decision-making processes. Integrated Water Resources Planning process is used to create a shared vision among the stakeholders involved in water supply planning. This model is being used in Kane County, Lake County, by the 11 County RWSPG, and by the states of Texas, California, Florida, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington.
  • - Mention how low impact the wells are and point out the well stickup Show the soil core sample that will be taken – mention the educational component

Groundwater Protection: Sustainability in the Face of Development Groundwater Protection: Sustainability in the Face of Development Presentation Transcript

  •  
  • Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • EVAPORATION TRANSPIRATION CONDENSATION PRECIPITATION RUNOFF INFILTRATION GROUNDWATER SURFACE WATER WETLANDS/FENS Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • 60% of your body 70% of your brain 80% of your blood Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • While you can survive almost a month without food…
    Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • You can’t survive one week without water! Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  •  
  • http://www.ienearth.org/water.html http://flowingdata.com/2010/04/01/discuss-drinkable-water-in-the-world/ Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  •  
  • Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Overuse Irrigation Impervious Surfaces Urban Sprawl Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • 2000-2009 World Water Conflicts
    Drought and water inequities spark killings in India (2009) Water clashes kill 40 in Kenya and Ethiopia (2006) Mexican farmers shot in duel over spring (2004) Information from the Pacific Institute: http://www.worldwater.org/conflict/map/ Terrorists Target Water Systems (2002) Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Water Quality & Quantity Concerns
  •  
    • McHenry County is solely dependant on groundwater for all of its potable water needs
    • Adequate groundwater quantity and quality is essential to the present and future well being of McHenry County agriculturalists, residents and businesses.
    • The groundwater supply is:
      • Limited
      • Vulnerable to pollution
      • Is being mismanaged
    Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Year Million gallons per day 34.6 51 67.5 120 160 180 LRI Projected Use ~ Sustainable Yield MRI Projected Use Max Comprehensive Plan LRI – less resource intensive MRI – more resource intensive Projected population growth of ~200,000 by 2030 Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Municipal Water Supplies 40 km Water Supply: 100% Groundwater ~60% Sand and Gravel Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • McHenry County Water Supply Projections Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • No Water
    • Sound & Healthy Economy
    • Healthy Environment
    • Natural Areas Thrive
    • High Quality of Life
    • Sustainable & Safe Water Supply
    Sprawl Water Supply Planing No Water Supply Planning
    • Loss of Jobs, Retail & Industry
    • Degraded Natural Areas & Loss of Open Space
    • Loss of Agriculture
    • Decreased Quality of Life
    • Decreased Property Values
    • Stagnation
    What about Public Safety and Fire Protection? Smart Growth Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • Why is it that water takes up
    • 70% of the earth’s surface and 60% of our bodies , yet so little of our thinking?
    Imagine turning water problems into opportunities!
    • Create a Program to:
    • Protect and preserve the
    • quantity and quality
    • of groundwater for our generation and future generations, including the built and natural environment
    Cassandra McKinney McHenry County Water Resources
  • Integrated Water Resources 7 Step Planning Process Integrated Water Resource Planning (Palmer and Lundberg 2003) Identify Problems and Opportunities Create a Planning Team Inventories and Forecasting Formulating Alternative Plans Evaluating Alternative Plans Ranking Alternative Plans Plan Implementation Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • Integrated Water Resources Planning
      • Encourages cooperative planning
      • Scientific Understanding
      • Reasonable / Attainable Goals
    • Planning “Team”:
      • government leaders & regional partners,
      • business and industry,
      • agriculture, nurseries, sod farms
      • special interest groups,
      • residents
    • Shared Vision = Common Goals
    Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • Manage supply and demand
    • Plan for growth and drought
    • Utilize water conservation programs
    • Value the land and treat water in all its forms as a resource !
      • Stormwater, Groundwater, Surface Water, Wetlands… they are all part of the water cycle and natural water balance.
    • Consider all your “ development ” options
      • Open space, agriculture, pervious pavement, raingardens, parks, conservation design developments, buffer strips, and more...
    • Increase access to recycling centers
    • Educate, Educate, Educate!!!
    Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Water Resources Action Plan:
    • Quality
      • Pollution Prevention
      • Sensible Salting
    • Quantity
      • Water Conservation
      • Conservation Design
    • Quantity & Quality
      • Groundwater Recharge
      • Protection of Water Dependent Ecosystems
      • Wastewater
      • Water Supply Planning
        • Drought Preparedness
        • Contingency Planning
    Education Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  •  
    • Scientific Research
    • Symposiums, Workshops, and other Educational Offerings
      • Municipal
      • Public
        • Adult Education
        • Youth Education
      • Private Business Owners
        • Agriculture, turf management, snow operators and more…
    • Municipal and County-Board Buy-in
    Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  •  
  •  
  • Geological Fieldwork
    • ISGS Drilling (08-09)
    • USACE (2008)
    • Previous Drilling
    • Geophysics
    Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Geologic Core Drilling Drilling Geophysics Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Visualization topography
  • Visualization roads
  • Visualization soils
  • Visualization Geology/field
  • Visualization Aerial photos Prairieview Education Center Route 176 Behan Road
  • Visualization subsurface
  • McHenry County Bedrock Surface Key: Yellow units are aquifer units All Other colors are non-aquifer units – usually tills.
  • McHenry County Lowermost Sand/Gravel Aquifer Key: Yellow units are aquifer units All Other colors are non-aquifer units – usually tills.
  • McHenry County Oldest glacial till non-aquifer Key: Yellow units are aquifer units All Other colors are non-aquifer units – usually tills.
  • McHenry County Middle Sand/Gravel Aquifer Key: Yellow units are aquifer units All Other colors are non-aquifer units – usually tills.
  • McHenry County Major non-aquifer confining unit in the County (Tiskilwa Till) Key: Yellow units are aquifer units All other colors are non-aquifer units – usually tills.
  • McHenry County Minor non-aquifer confining unit (Yorkville till) Key: Yellow units are aquifer units All other colors are non-aquifer units – usually tills.
  • McHenry County Major shallow aquifer unit Key: Yellow units are aquifer units All other colors are non-aquifer units – usually tills.
  • McHenry County Major shallow mixed aquifer/non-aquifer unit Key: Yellow units are aquifer units All other colors are non-aquifer units – usually tills.
  • McHenry County Modern shallow aquifer/non aquifer materials-youngest stuff Key: Yellow units are aquifer units All Other colors are non-aquifer units – usually tills.
  • Example: Detailed 3D Hydrogeologic Mapping in Lake County, IL Central Great Lakes Geologic Mapping Coalition Project, ISGS Jason Thomason, Ardith Hansel, Mike Barnhardt, Barb Stiff, Steve Brown, Andy Stumpf Note : yellows (sand and gravel; aquifers) greens and purples (clay rich units; aquitards) Bedrock Land Surface Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  •  
  • Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  • Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • DESCRIPTION:
      • Latitude 42°28'44.84", Longitude 88°28'53.85"   NAD83 Mchenry County, Illinois, Hydrologic Unit 07120006
      • Well depth: 120.6 feet Hole depth: 234 feet Land surface altitude: 949feet above sea level NAVD88. Well completed in "Sand and gravel aquifers (glaciated regions)" (N100GLCIAL) national aquifer. Well completed in "Quaternary System" (110QRNR) local aquifer
    Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • Preliminary Water Quality Data
    • High Iron Countywide
    • Low Chlorides in 38 of 41 wells
    • Overall pretty good water quality
    • High nitrates in 2 wells
    • Arsenic of concern in 20% of wells
    • No VOC’s really of concern in any of the observation wells
    Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • Illinois State Water Survey
    Colored drawdown map for different degrees of drawdown
    • Sensitive Aquifer Recharge Areas Map
    Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
  •  
      • Public and Private Sector
        • Environmental Impacts
        • Storage
        • Handling
        • Application Rates
        • Material Options
        • Anti-icing
        • De-icing
    Winter Snow and Ice Operations – Training and Certification Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
      • In partnership with:
        • Local Law Enforcement
        • Illinois Environmental Protection Agency
      • Open to all county “residents” –
        • Not open to physicians, nursing homes, or pharmacies
      • Free anonymous disposal of:
        • Most controlled and uncontrolled pharmaceuticals
        • Most over the counter remedies
    Medication Disposal Program Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • Partners in Paint Recycling
    • Household Hazardous Waste Disposal
    • McHenry County Schools Environmental Education Program
      • 2 nd & 8 th Grade – Water Lessons instructed by professional staff
      • K-12 lessons available on www.mchenryh2o.com
    • In Development:
      • Turf Management Workshop
    Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • Ordinance Development
    • Contingency Planning and Mutual Aid Planning Assistance
    • Access to and explanation of Scientific Research Results
    • Educational Brochures
    • Training Programs by Request
    Sampling of Additional Assistance Available to Local, Regional and State Governments Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • Water Resources Action Plan
      • Model policies and ordinances
    • Children’s Activities
    • Teacher Lesson Plans
    • Brochures
    • Groundwater Research
    • Newspaper Articles
    www.mchenryh2o.com Cassandra McKinney WaterCon2011
    • Best Practices alone are not enough.
    • When planning, utilize a holistic approach, consider existing plans, and value the land and our water resources!
    • Be a part of the solution, every drop counts!
  • Questions? “ We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac
  • Cassandra McKinney Water Resources Manager - Division of Water Resources McHenry County Government 2200 N. Seminary Avenue Woodstock, IL 60098-2637 Phone: (815) 334-4213, Fax: (815) 338-3991 clmckinney@co.mchenry.il.us www.mchenryh2o.com
  • ABSTRACT Over the past two decades, McHenry County, Illinois has been one of the fastest growing counties in the State of Illinois. In addition, the County is solely dependent on groundwater for its drinking water resource, with no other options available. From 2000 to 2030, McHenry County’s population (current population 310,000) is expected to grow by 190,000. In the year 2000, water use in the county amounted to an annual average of 34.6 million gallons per day (mgd). By 2030, average annual water use is estimated to almost double to 67.5 mgd. With this tremendous growth, water shortages are forecasted as early as 2020 in portions of the county and groundwater degradation is already occurring. In addition to groundwater being the only viable drinking water resource for McHenry County, groundwater protection is a challenge because the State of Illinois follows the doctrine of reasonable use. With the absence of statutory authority, counties are unable to enforce groundwater ordinances in areas other than the unincorporated. The impending water shortages and the lack of statutory authority prompted the creation of a Water Resource Manager position to utilize the cooperative planning process to coordinate the development of a multi-faceted, inter-governmental Water Resources Action Plan. People are more likely to support that which they create. Over the past two years, the cooperative planning process undertaken encouraged the involvement of government leaders, regional partners, special interest groups and citizens in the development of a county-wide groundwater protection program. This program uniquely seeks to address quantity and quality in one comprehensive program with the underlying goal “to provide a sustainable and safe water supply for current and future generations, including the built and natural environments.” The Water Resources Action Plan was completed in October 2009 and will assist in assuring our growing population an adequate, sustainable supply of safe water in the future. Finally, the impending water shortages also prompted the county to spearhead further scientific research on the sustainability of the groundwater resource. Therefore, the County has undertaken multiple scientific research projects: Three-dimensional Geological Mapping, Hydrological Flow Modeling, and a Real-time Observation Well Network, to support the Water Resources Action Plan and assist stakeholders in making timely management decisions.