6. delinquency environmental and theories

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CJCJ's Executive Director Daniel Macallair, is a practitioner-in-residence at San Francisco State University (SFSU)'s Department of Criminal Justice Studies. These slides are from his Juvenile Justice course materials.

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6. delinquency environmental and theories

  1. 1. www.cjcj.org© Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 201340 Boardman PlaceSan Francisco, CA 94103Social DisorganizationRobert Shaw and Henry McKayand the Chicago School
  2. 2. www.cjcj.org© Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 201340 Boardman PlaceSan Francisco, CA 94103Shaw and McKayand Social Disorganization• if high delinquency rates for particular immigrant groupsremained high during their migration through the city’sdifferent ecological environments, then delinquencycould be associated with their distinctive constitutional orcultural features;• if delinquency rates decreased as immigrants movedthrough different ecological environments, thendelinquency could not be associated with the particularconstitution of the immigrants, but must somehow beconnected with their environment.
  3. 3. www.cjcj.org© Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 201340 Boardman PlaceSan Francisco, CA 94103Social Disorganization Theory•DeterioratedNeighborhoods•Inadequate social control•Law violating gangs andgroups•Conflicting social values
  4. 4. www.cjcj.org© Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 201340 Boardman PlaceSan Francisco, CA 94103Strain Theory•Unequal distributionof wealth and power•Frustration/Anger•Alternative methodsof achievementRobert Merton 1910 -2003
  5. 5. www.cjcj.org© Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 201340 Boardman PlaceSan Francisco, CA 94103Cultural Deviance Theory• Social disorganization and strain encouragesdevelopment of subcultures• Sub-cultural values are in opposition to conventionalvalues
  6. 6. www.cjcj.org© Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 201340 Boardman PlaceSan Francisco, CA 94103Cultural Deviance TheoryWalter Miller and Lower-ClassCulture• Trouble• Toughness• Smartness• Excitement• Fate• AutonomyAlbert Cohen and MiddleClass Culture (1955)• Ambition• Individual Responsibility• Achievement• Temperance• Rationality• Courtesy and Likeability• Less Physical Aggression• Educational Recreation• Respect for Property
  7. 7. www.cjcj.org© Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 201340 Boardman PlaceSan Francisco, CA 94103Social ProcessTheories
  8. 8. www.cjcj.org© Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 201340 Boardman PlaceSan Francisco, CA 94103Differential AssociationPrinciples of Criminology (1939)Delinquent behavior is learnedwithin interpersonal groups and isnot an inherited trait.Youth become delinquent throughinteractions with those whom theyidentify or through interactions withthose whom they seek acceptanceEdwin Sutherland(1883-1950)

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