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  • 1. CARLOS ALBIZU UNIVERSITYSAN JUAN CAMPUS<br />MASTER SYLLABUS<br />PSYF-500: THEORIES OF LEARNING AND MOTIVATION <br />CREDITS: 3CONTACT HOURS: 45<br />COURSE DESCRIPTION<br />This is a required core course. This course presents contemporary and classical theories of learning and motivation. Relevant research in this area of study will be discussed. Implications of studies in the field of learning and motivation for psychological interventions will be stressed.<br />PRE-REQUISITES<br />NONE<br />COURSE OBJECTIVE<br />2.5 Acquire general knowledge of the foundations of Psychology<br />GENERAL COMPETENCIES<br />2.5.1 . Demonstrate knowledge of the different theoretical perspectives in the field of psychology<br />TASKS/ACTIVITIES<br />1. Essays comparing the different learning and motivational theories<br />2. Group discussions and debates about the different learning and motivational theories<br />REQUIRED TEXT BOOKS<br />Driscoll, M.P. (2005). Psychology of Learning for Instruction (3era ed.). Boston: Pearson – Allyn and Bacon.<br />ISBN-10: 0205578438<br />ISBN-13: 978-0205578436<br />Deckers, L. (2005). Motivation: Biological, psychological, and environmental. <br />Boston: Allyn & Bacon.<br />ISBN-10: 0-205-61081-1<br />ISBN-13: 978-0-205-61081-5<br />Supplementary books<br />Navas Robleto, J.J. (1998). Conceptos y teorías del aprendizaje. San Juan: Publicaciones Puertorriqueñas.<br />ISBN-0-929441-86-9<br />Schwartz, B., Wasserman, E.A., & Robbins, S.J. (2001). Psychology of Learning and Behavior (5ta. ed.). W.W. New York: Norton & Co. <br />ISBN-10: 0393975916<br />ISBN-13: 978-0393975918<br />Additional readings<br />Call CIRC LB 1051 .T53   Author Thorndike, Edward L.(Edward Lee),1874-1949.; Columbia University.; Teachers College.; Institute of Psychological Research.   Title The fundamentals of learning [by] Edward L. Thorndike [and the staff of the Division of Psychology of the Institute of Educational Research of Teachers College, Columbia University]   Publisher New York, AMS Press [1971]   ISBN/ISSN 0404064299   <br />Call CIRC BF 54 .B22   Author Bandura, Albert,1925-comp   Title Psychological modeling; conflicting theories.   Publisher Chicago, Aldine Atherton [1971]   ISBN/ISSN 0202250792 0202250806 (pbk)   <br />Call CIRC BF 723 .C5 B73 1980   Author Bruner, Jerome Seymour.   Title Investigaciones sobre el desarrollo cognitivo / J.S. Bruner; traducido del ingles por Antonio Maldonado.   Publisher Madrid : Pablo del Rio, 1980.   ISBN/ISSN 84-7430-068-1   <br />Call CIRC BF311 .L8713   Author Luria, A. R.   Title Cognitive development : Its cultural and social foundations / byA.R. Luria.   ISBN/ISSN 0674137310   <br />Ardila, R. (1977). Psicología del aprendizaje. México D.F.: Siglo Veintiuno Editores, S.A.<br />Cap. 8 <br />Ubicación en la UCA: Circulación <br />BF<br />318<br />A75<br />Weiner, B. (1972). Theories of motivation: From mechanism to cognition. U.S.A.: Rand <br />McNally College Publishing Co. <br />Cap. 1<br />Ubicación en la UCA: Circulación <br />BF<br />683<br />.W35<br />ITINERARY OF CLASS UNITS<br />Unit 1: Theories of learning and motivation and basic elements of <br />the learning process. <br />Unit 2: Biological bases of learning and memory<br />Unit 3: Connectionism theories of I. Pavlov and E. L. Thorndike<br />Unit 4: Operant conditions of B. F. Skinner<br />Unit 5: Contiguity interpretations of Learning: J.B. Watson & R. Guthrie<br />Unit 6: Cognitive theories of learning: E.C. Tolman, J. Piaget, & Cognitive Information Processing Model<br />Unit 7: Observational learning of A. Bandura and Gestalt Theory<br />Unit 8:Constructivism/Integrationist theories: L. Vygotsky & J. Bruner<br />Unit 9: Midterm Exam<br />Unit 10: Introductory aspects for the study of motivation<br /> Unit 11: Motivational aspects in the psychoanalytic theory of S. Freud <br />Unit 12:Motivational aspects in field theory by K. Lewin<br />Unit 13: Motivation and self-regulation: Maslow’s motivational hierarchy and Keller’s motivational theory<br />Unit 14: Final Exam<br />COURSE CONTACT HOURS <br />Professors who teach the course must divide the contact hours the following way:<br />Face-to-face time in the classroom must not be less than 40.0 hours (16 classes, 2.5 hours each class).<br />For the remaining hours (5 hours), students will conduct research projects or homework outside the classroom. These projects or homework will include, but are not limited to, writing essays, analysis of videos selected by the professor, debates or individual projects pertaining to topics discussed in class.<br />METHODOLOGY<br />Teaching methodology for this course can include, among others: conferences by the professor and group discussions.<br /> <br />EDUCATIONAL TECHNIQUES<br /> <br />The techniques could include: PowerPoint presentations and discussion.<br />EVALUATION<br />Class attendance and punctuality are required to approved the course <br />Submitting of required tasks<br />Two tests of 100 percent (mid-term and final) must be approved <br />Active participation in class<br />The professor could required quizzes for reading check<br />ATTENDANCE POLICY<br />Class attendance is mandatory for all students. After two unexcused absences, the student will be dropped from the class, unless the professor recommends otherwise. When a student misses a class, he/she is responsible for the material presented in class. <br />AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA)<br />Students that need special accommodations should request them directly to the professor during the first week of class.<br />COURSE UNITS<br />UNIT 1: THEORIES OF LEARNING AND MOTIVATION AND BASIC<br /> ELEMENTS OF THE LEARNING PROCESS<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the different theories of learning and motivation.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Identify the material that will be discussed in the course.<br />Discuss the importance of learning in the evolution of the species and human survival.<br />Identify terminology in learning.<br />Define the meaning of learning and memory from psychological and biological points of view.<br />Define learning and discuss its principal components.<br />Explain the advantages of laboratory and experimental studies in the psychology of learning.<br />Present the different interpretations of the theories: cognitive, reinforcement, social learning and mechanistic theories.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Driscoll, M.P. (2005) <br />Chapter 1-Introduction to Theories of Learning and Instruction<br />Chapter 8-Biological Bases of Learning and Memory<br />UNIT 2: BIOLOGICAL BASES OF LEARNING AND MEMORY<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the biological bases of learning and memory.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Understand the basic concepts of evolution and behavior.<br />Discuss the neurophysiology of learning.<br />Present the basic principles in cognitive psychology and learning.<br />Present how learning is influenced by human biological aspects.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Driscoll, M.P. (2005) <br />Chapter 8-Biological Bases of Learning and Memory<br />Chapter 9-Motivation and Self-Regulation in Learning<br />UNIT 3: CONNECTIONISM THEORIES OF I. PAVLOV AND E. L. THORNDIKE<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to explain classical conditions of I. Pavlov and connectionism theory by E.L. Thorndike.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to.<br />Discuss the original experiment, terminology and central processes in classical conditioning of I. Pavlov.<br />Explain the principles of learning including: extinction, generalization, discrimination, and spontaneous recovery.<br />Explain the reinforcement principles of learning and the process of higher-order conditioning.<br />Present diverse practical implications for psychological interventions.<br /> Explain Thorndike’s basic experiment about learning and principal concepts and explanations of Thorndike’s theories before and after 1930 (laws of exercise and effect).<br />ASSIGNED READINGS: <br />Driscoll, M.P. (2005) <br />Chapter 1-Introduction to Theories of Learning and Instruction<br />Navas, J. (1998)<br />Chapter 2- Classic Conditioning<br />Chapter 5 - Connectionism <br />Thorndike E. L. (1971). The fundamentals of learning. New York, AMS Press<br />UNIT 4: OPERANT CONDITIONS OF B. F. SKINNER<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to discuss B. F. Skinner’s theory about operant conditioning.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Describe operant conditioning in terms of its characteristics and fundamental position within learning.<br />Discuss and analyze positive and negative reinforcement.<br />Discuss the concept of reinforcement and its importance in operant conditioning.<br />Analyze and discuss relevant experiments.<br />Explain the concepts of extinction, generalization and discriminatory stimulus.<br /> Skinner’s operant view of motivation<br />Discuss the practical implications of Skinner’s theory.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Driscoll, M.P. (2005) <br />Chapter 2-Radical Behaviorism<br />Navas, J. (1998)<br />Chapter 6-Operant Conditioning<br />UNIT 5: CONTIGUITY INTERPRETATIONS OF LEARNING: J.B. WATSON & <br /> R. GUTHRIE <br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will know the behaviorism theory of John B. Watson and interpretation of learning according to R. Guthrie<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to.<br />Describe the fundamental principles of behaviorism according to Watson and learning according to Guthrie.<br />Explain the principles of recency and frequency as elements that reinforce learning.<br />Explain the practical implications and applications of the concepts developed by Watson and Guthrie.<br /> Explain the fundamental principle of learning according to Guthrie.<br /> Explain learning as a process of “all or nothing” and Guthrie’s techniques used to eliminate habits.<br /> Discuss Guthrie’s theory concerning the process of punishment, extinction, generalization, and discrimination.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Driscoll, M.P. (2005) <br />Chapter 2-Radical Behaviorism<br />Navas, J. (1998)<br />Chapter 3- John B. Watson <br />Chapter 4 – Edwin Guthrie <br />UNIT 6: THE COGNITIVE THEORIES OF LEARNING: E.C. TOLMAN, J.<br /> PIAGET, & COGNITIVE INFORMATION PROCESSING MODEL<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to analyze and discuss the Tolman’s, and Piagetian theories of learning as well as the Cognitive Information Processing Model.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Discuss the Tolman’s and Piagetian position with regards to learning.<br /> Understand and explain Tolman’s terms: docility, disruption and reinforcer devaluation.<br /> Present Tolman’s purposive behaviorism and its implications in learning.<br /> Analyze and discuss Piaget’s concepts: assimilation, accommodation, and equilibration.<br /> Discuss the practical implications of the Cognitive Information Processing Model.<br />Discuss and analyze relevant experiments.<br />Analyze and discuss practical implications concerning these theories.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Driscoll, M.P. (2005) <br />Chapter 3-Cognitive Information Processing<br />Chapter 6-Cognitive and Knowledge Development<br />UNIT 7: OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING OF A. BANDURA AND GESTALT<br /> THEORY<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to understand Bandura’s theory about learning by modeling.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to.<br />Discuss the concept of learning by modeling and/or imitation.<br />Analyze and discuss the concept of vicarious learning, reinforcement, punishment and vicarious extinction.<br />Discuss the principal psychological processes in social learning.<br />Discuss the practical implications of modeling.<br /> Describe the origins and principal exponents of the Gestalt field.<br /> Explain the meaning of the concept Gestalt, “insight”.<br /> Explain the Gestalt’s laws in learning.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Driscoll, M.P. (2005)<br />Chapter 9-Motivation and Self-Regulation in Learning<br />Navas, J. (1998)<br />Chapter 8-Social/ Observational Learning<br />Bandura, A, (1971). Psychological modeling; conflicting theories. Chicago: Aldine Atherton<br />UNIT 8: CONSTRUCTIVISM/INTEGRATIONIST THEORIES: L. <br /> VIGOTSKY AND J. BRUNNER<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the concepts in theses theories and its applications to psychology.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Explain the concept of constructivism/integrationist.<br /> Understand and explain Brunner’s three modes of representation.<br /> Present applications to Brunner’s concept of learning by discovery.<br /> Understand and explain Vygotsky’s developmental method.<br /> Present and explain the social origins of higher mental processes according to Vygotsky.<br /> Discuss similarities and differences among Brunner and Vigotsky’s theories of cognitive development.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Driscoll, M.P. (2005). <br />Chapter 7-Interactional Theories of Cognitive Development<br /> <br />UNIT 9: MIDTERM EXAM <br />This will included the discussed class material and the assigned readings. <br />UNIT 10: INTRODUCTORY CONCEPTS FOR THE STUDY OF MOTIVATION<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the basic concepts concerning motivation<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Explain the concept of motivation.<br />Define motivation.<br />Present the principal characteristics of motivated behavior.<br />Compare and contract the similarities and differences of learning and motivation.<br />Compare mechanistic versus cognitive views in the psychology of motivation.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Deckers, L. (2005)<br />Chapter 1-Introduction to Motivation and Emotion<br />Chapter 2-The History of Motivation and Emotion<br />Chapter 10-Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivation<br />UNIT 11: MOTIVATIONALCONCEPTS IN THE PSYCHOANALYTIC THEORY <br /> OF S. FREUD <br />Upon successful completions of this unit, students will be able to discuss and compare motivational concepts in the psychoanalytic theory of S. Freud.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to.<br />1. Analyze and discuss the general view of the evolution of thinking <br />and Freud’s theory and his proposed hypothesis of motivation in the psychoanalytic theory.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Deckers, L. (2005)<br />Chapter 2- History of Motivation and Emotion <br />UNIT 12: MOTIVATIONAL ASPECTS IN FIELD THEORY BY K. LEWIN<br />Upon successful completions of this unit, students will be able to discuss Lewin’s motivational theory. <br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Explain the fundamental concepts of the theory of Lewin.<br />Analyze and discuss the different applications of K. Lewin’s theory.<br />Define the terms developed by Lewin in his field theory.<br />Analyze and discuss the general view of the field theory.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Deckers, L. (2005)<br />Chapter 2- History of Motivation and Emotion <br />Chapter 11-Goal motivation<br />UNIT 13: MOTIVATION AND SELF-REGULATION: MASLOW’S <br /> MOTIVATIONAL HIERARCHY AND KELLER’S MOTIVATIONAL<br /> THEORY<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to understand the motivational theory of A. Maslow.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to.<br />1. Explain the importance of the concept “needs” in the motivational <br /> theory of A. Maslow.<br />Discuss and explain the hierarchy of needs in Maslow’s theory.<br /> Discuss and explain the implications of each one for human behavior.<br />Analyze and discuss the relationship between maladjusted behavior and the distortion in the satisfaction scale of needs in Maslow’s theory.<br /> Understand and mention de difference between “motivation” and “meta-motivation” in Maslow’s theory.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Deckers, L. (2005)<br />Chapter 8- Drives, needs and awareness <br />UNIT 14: FINAL EXAM<br />This will included the discussed class material and the assigned readings. <br />REFERENCES<br />Bandura, A. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency. American Psychologist, 37, 122-147.<br />Bandura, A. (1977). Social Learning Theory. New York: General Learning Press. <br />Cofer C. N. (2000). Motivación y Emoción. México, D.F: Editorial Limusa SA<br />Driscoll, M. P. (1994). Psychology of learning for instruction. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.<br />Maslow, A.H. (1976). Motivation and personality. (2nd Ed.). New York: Harper and Row.<br />Skinner, B.F. (1975). Acerca del Conductismo. Barcelona: Editorial Fontanella.<br />Weiner, B. (1992). Human Motivation: Metaphors, Theories and Research. California: Sage.<br />Evaluation Criteria for Written Report / Essays, Conceptualizations<br />Course: _____________ <br />Semester: __________________<br />Professor: ________________________<br />Name of student: ______________________________<br />Theme of Oral Report: __________________________________________________________________<br />Final Grade: _________Total Points: _____/16<br />0No aplica1Pobre2Regular3Bueno4ExcelentePuntuaciónUso de reglas de relación y puntuaciónNo aplicaTiene muchos errores que distraen considerablemente o totalmente al lectorTiene errores ortográficos, de acentuación o conjugación de verbos. Los errores distraen al lectorNo tiene errores ortográficos de acentuación o de conjugación de verbos o los errores son mininosNo tiene errores ortográficos, de acentuación o de conjugación de verbosResponde la pregunta o tema del trabajoNo aplicaLas ideas que se presentan tienen poca o ninguna relación con el tema, están pobremente definidas, no son claras ni se presentan con objetividad. Muchas ideas se repitenCasi todas las ideas que se presentan tienen relación directa con el tema y se presentan con bastante claridad y objetividad. Estas no se repiten ni se presentan lagunasTodas las ideas que se presentan tienen relación directa con el tema. Las ideas se presentan con claridad y objetividad. Estas no se repiten ni se presentan lagunas.Presenta dominio del material y las ideas se presentan con claridad y elocuenciaExpone opinión respecto al tema de trabajoNo aplicaNo expone su opinión o resulta muy difícil separar su opinión de lo expuesto por otros autoresExpone su opinión respecto al tema aunque algunos casos olvido expresarlaExpone claramente su opinión respecto al tema de trabajoExpone su opinión respecto al trabajo y realiza un análisis crítico (reflexión) sobre el temaEntrega el trabajo a la hora y día indicadosNo aplicaNo entrego el trabajo a la hora y día indicado o lo entrego con un día o mas de retrasoEntrego el trabajo el día indicado con un retraso de más de una horaEntrego el trabajo el día acordado con un atraso de menos de una horaEntrego el trabajo el día acordado y a la hora estipuladaPuntuación Total<br />Puntuaciones:Porciento Obtenido: _______<br />16 = 100%<br />15 = 94%<br />14 = 87%<br />13 = 81%<br />12 = 75%<br />11 = 69%<br />10 = 62%<br />9 = 56%<br />8 = 50%<br />7 = 44%<br />6 = 37%<br />5 = 31%<br />4 = 25%<br />3 = 19%<br />2 = 12%<br />1 = 6%<br />