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P sye 743 master syllabus agosto08 Document Transcript

  • 1. CARLOS ALBIZU UNIVERSITYSAN JUAN CAMPUS<br />MASTER SYLLABUS<br />PHCP-643 PSYCHOTHERAPY RESEARCH IN CLINICAL PRACTICE<br />CREDITS: 3CONTACT HOURS: 45<br />COURSE DESCRIPTION<br />The student will learn how to empirically assess the results of psychotherapy interventions. Emphasis will be given the recent advances in the field, such as the use of treatment manuals, and the use of empirically based clinical guidelines. Also, students will be exposed to the empirically supported psychotherapies and to evidence-based treatments.. They will identify what types of psychotherapies have been empirically supported with what types of specific psychopathologies. Also, emphasis will be given to current debates, such as the use of qualitative versus meta-analytic reviews of the empirical literature, and the evaluation of common versus specific effects of the psychotherapies.<br />PRE-REQUISITES<br />PHCP-585, PHCP-587; PHCP-526; PHCP-528<br />COURSE OBJECTIVES<br />1. 1. Acquire research skills that will be used for the construction/creation of knowledge<br />1.2. Learn to use and integrate computerized programs, databases, or systems for research purposes<br />1.3.1. Develop critical thinking skills in research in clinical psychology<br />2.1. Acquire comprehensive clinical skills that will impact clinical practice<br />2.3. Application of ethical principles to the clinical & research practice<br />COMPETENCIES<br />1.1.2.Development of relevant research hypothesis & methods of problem analyses through multiple methods of research inquiry & analysis<br />1.1.3.Find and use research resources<br />1.2.1.Use library & information technology effectively<br />1.3.1. Ability to critically evaluate literature and identify gaps and directions for the future<br />2.1.3. Case conceptualization and diagnoses through application of clinical strategies for problem analysis<br />2.3.2. Awareness and adherence of ethical principles supporting research<br />SPECIFIC COURSE COMPETENCIES<br />The student will acquire knowledge about the principal controversies in the field, and will develop a critical stance toward them (the use of manuals, the Dodo bird verdict, dissemination efforts, the transportability issue to minority populations, etc).<br />Will be familiarized with some treatment manuals for specific disorders.<br />Will be able to read, analyze and comprehend recent research articles that present the evidence base for different psychotherapies.<br />Will be able know what types of psychotherapies has, at the present time, been empirically supported.<br />REQUIRED TEXT BOOKS<br />Nathan, P. E., & Gorman, J. M. (Eds.) (2007). A guide to treatments that work (3rd . Ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.<br />Norcross, J. C., Beutler, L. E. & Levant, R. F. (Eds.) (2006) Evidence based <br />practices in mental health. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.<br />ITINERARY OF CLASS UNITS<br />Unit 1: Introduction<br />Unit 2: Historical overview <br />Unit 3: Quantitative and qualitative review of psychotherapy outcome research <br />Unit 4: Modern research debates and issues <br />Unit 5: Empirically supported psychotherapy <br />Unit 6: Panic, phobias and generalized anxiety disorders<br />Unit 7: Post traumatic stress disorder, social phobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder<br />Unit 8: Partial exam<br />Unit 9: Psychodynamic therapies and psychoanalysis<br />Unit 10: Mood disorders: Cognitive-behavioral approaches<br />Unit 11: Mood disorders: Interpersonal therapy approaches <br />Unit 12: Psychotherapy research with children: Internalizing disorders <br />Unit 13: Psychotherapy research with children: externalizing disorders<br />Unit 14: Psychotherapy research with children: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder <br />Unit 15: Treatment and research questions<br />Unit 16: Final exam<br />COURSE CONTACT HOURS <br />Professors who teach the course must divide the contact hours the following way:<br />Face-to-face time in the classroom must not be less than 40 hours (16 classes, 2.5 hours each class).<br />For the remaining hours (≥ 5 hours), students will conduct research projects or homework outside the classroom. These projects or homework will include, but are not limited to, a critical written reflection of a topic, and preparation for an oral presentation of a research article.<br />METHODOLOGY<br />The professor who offers the course will select the specific methodology. The methodologies often used are: conferences by the professor, group discussions of assigned readings, class research projects, and the oral presentation of a research article.<br />EDUCATIONAL TECHNIQUES<br />The professor who offers the course will select the specific educational techniques. These techniques could include, but are not limited to: debates, practical demonstrations, research analysis, simulations, slide shows and forums.<br />TASK/ACTIVITIES<br />1- All students will present in front of the class an oral report in which they will present the results of a recent research article and will present their opinion of the methodology.<br />2- Students will actively participate on class on current debates such as the value of psychoanalysis, common therapeutic factors, and the value of empirical research.<br />3- Student will present a written paper (about 12 pages) presenting their opinion about current debates concerning the value of efficacy or effectiveness research designs.<br />4- They will learn and apply the use of effect-sizes on different data-sets.<br />EVALUATION OF COMPETENCIES<br />One written exam which will cover the knowledge acquired of the main thematic themes, such as the effectiveness of psychotherapy, the use of treatment manuals, the common factor approach, evidence based practice, etc.<br />An oral report in which the student presents in front of the class, a psychotherapy research article published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (last three years).<br />A written manuscript in which each student has to take sides concerning a recent controversy in the field, using his/her critical skills gained in the course.<br />ATTENDANCE POLICY<br />Class attendance is mandatory for all students. After two unexcused absences, the student will be dropped from the class, unless the professor recommends otherwise. When a student misses a class, he/she is responsible for the material presented in class. <br />AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA)<br />Students that need special accommodations should request them directly to the professor during the first week of class.<br />COURSE UNITS<br />UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION <br /> <br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the most important research terms, methodological designs and techniques in the evaluation of psychotherapies. Also, the student will be exposed to some historical data and research to facilitate the comprehension of the importance of psychotherapy research.<br /> <br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Understand the methodological terms and designs that are relevant to comprehend the research literature. <br />Know the historical development and evolution of research efforts to validate and support the efficacy of the psychotherapies. <br />Explore the epistemological origins of the different approaches to investigate the effects of psychological therapies.<br />Discuss the pros and cons of the different research approaches to investigate the effects of psychological therapies.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br /> <br />Kendall, P. C., Holmbeck, G., & Verduin, T. (2004). Methodology, design and evaluation in psychotherapy research. In M. J. Lambert (Ed.), Handbook of psychotherapy and behavior change (pp. 16-43). New York: Wiley.<br />UNIT 2: HISTORICAL OVERVIEW<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the field of psychotherapy research, including case studies, correlational research, experimental designs to the current knowledge base. Also, the students will understand that there are still some gaps in the knowledge base of this field. Specific emphasis will be given to the critical analysis of different case studies that in previous decades were presented as scientific evidence of the effectiveness of psychotherapy.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Analyze case studies as evidence of the effectiveness of an intervention with emphasis on Freud’s case studies (e. g., Anna O’s case)<br />Describe the criticisms of psychotherapy developed by Eysenck in 1952 <br />Describe the enthusiasm in the 1960s for behavioral models<br />Describe the Dodo Bird verdict of Luborsky, et al., in the 1970's<br />Develop knowledge about the literature on controlled clinical trials performed in the1980’s and 1990’s.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS: <br />Eysenck, H. J. (1952). The effects of psychotherapy. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 15, 241-250.<br />Martínez-Taboas, A. (1988). ¿Son todas las psicoterapias igualmente efectivas? (Are all psychotherapies equally effective?). Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología, 20, 309-330.<br />Martínez-Taboas, A. (1999). Una reevaluación del caso de Anna O. (A reevaluation of the case of Anna O.) Revista Puertorriqueña de Psicología, 12, 29-54.<br />Sulloway, F. (1991). Reassessing Freud's case histories. Isis, 82, 245-275.<br />Lambert, M. J., & Ogles, B. M. (2004). The efficacy and effectiveness of psychotherapy. In M. J. Lambert (Ed.), Handbook of psychotherapy and behavior change (pp. 139-193). New York: Wiley.<br />UNIT 3: QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE REVIEW OF PSYCHOTHERAPY<br /> OUTCOME RESEARCH <br /> <br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the use of quantitative and qualitative reviews of the psychotherapy outcome research. Students will acquire skills in how to conduct a quantitative review (e.g., meta-analysis) and interpret the results. Also, they will acquire a knowledge base of how to conduct qualitative reviews of the research literature (e. g., box-score) and know the advantages and disadvantages of these.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Discuss the advantages, disadvantages and current debates about various forms of evaluating the research base of psychotherapy.<br />Understand what is a meta-analysis and interpret the results and the effects sizes.<br />Understand the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative reviews of the research literature<br />Understand when a combination of the qualitative and quantitative literature review is useful. <br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Luborsky, L., Rosenthal, R., Diguer, L., et al. (2002). The Dodo bird is alive and <br />well-mostly. Clinical Psychology, 9, 2-12.<br />Krahm, G. L., & Putnam, M. (2008). Qualitative methods in psychological research. In M. C. Roberts & S. S. Ilardi (Eds.), Handbook of research methods in clinical psychology (pp. 176-195). London: Blackwell.<br />Norcross, J. C., Hogan, T. P., & Koocher, G. P. (2008). Clinician’s guide to evidence-based practices. New York: Oxford University Press.<br />UNIT 4: MODERN RESEARCH DEBATES AND ISSUES PERTAINING TO<br /> THE USE OF TREATMENT MANUALS <br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand a variety of modern research debates and issues concerning the use and misuse of treatment manuals. The student will be exposed to the advantages and disadvantages of using empirically based treatment manuals in clinical practice and research. <br />Learning Objectives:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />1. Describe treatment manuals and the clinical guidelines that sustain its <br /> use.<br />2. Acquire knowledge about some of the most prominent treatment <br /> manuals and their clinical use.<br />3. Understand the benefits and pitfalls about the use of treatment <br /> manuals.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS: <br />Addis, M. E., & Cardemil, E. (2006). Psychotherapy manuals can improve <br />outcomes. In J. C. Norcross, L. E. Beutler, & R. F. Levant, (Eds.), <br />Evidence based practices in mental health (pp. 131-139). Washington, <br />DC: American Psychological Association.<br />Carroll, K. M., & Nuro, K. F. (2002). One size cannot fit all: A stage model for <br />psychotherapy manual development. Clinical Psychology, 14, 396-406.<br />UNIT 5: EMPIRICALLY SUPPORTED PSYCHOTHERAPY <br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will know the concept of empirically supported psychotherapies. This includes: what types of psychotherapies have been empirically supported; how they have been supported; decision rules concerning such adjudications; the biases and controversies concerning proposed lists of such therapies. Also, questions will be raised concerning the generalization of such therapies to the Hispano/Latino population.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successfully completing this unit, students will be able to:<br />Evaluate critically and empirically the data base of the empirically supported psychotherapies.<br />Acquire knowledge about the current debates that, in the one hand, defend such efforts, and, in the other hand, minimize such approaches.<br />Discuss the possible limitations of the use of empirically supported therapies, when applied with Latinos/Hispanics.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Bernal, G., & Scharrón del Río, M. R. (2001). Are empirically supported treatments valid for ethnic minorities? Toward an alternative approach for treatment research. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, 7, 328-342.<br />Chambless, D. L., & Ollendick, T. H. (2001). Empirically supported psychological interventions. Annual Review of Psychology, 52, 685-716.<br />O ‘ Donohue, W. T., & Fisher, J. E. (2006). Clinicians handbook of evidence-<br />based practice guidelines: The role of practice guidelines in systematic <br />quality improvement. In J. E. Fisher & W. T. O ‘Donohue (Eds.), <br />Practitioner’s guide to evidence-based psychotherapy (pp. 1-23). New York: Springer.<br />Parry, G., Roth, A., & Fonagy, P. (2005). Psychotherapy research, health policy, <br />and service provision. In A. Roth & P. Fonagy (Eds.), What works for <br />whom? (pp. 43-65). New York: Guilford.<br />UNIT 6: PANIC, PHOBIAS AND GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDERS AND<br /> SOCIAL PHOBIAS<br />Upon successfully completing this unit, students will be able to know of particular therapies that have been empirically supported.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />1. Present in class recent clinical research articles about the efficacy or<br /> effectiveness of psychotherapies with some particular anxiety disorders<br />Interpret and understand clinical research literature on panic, phobias and generalized anxiety disorders.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Barlow, D. H., Allen, L. B., & Basden, S. L. (2007). Psychosocial treatments for panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobias, and social anxiety disorder. In P. E. Nathan & J. M. Gorman (Eds.), A guide to treatment that works (pp. 351-394). New York: Oxford University Press.<br />UNIT 7: POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER, AND OBSESSIVE-<br /> COMPULSIVE DISORDER <br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the empirically supported therapies for post-traumatic stress disorder, social phobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder. <br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Acquire knowledge about specific supported psychotherapies for post traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder<br />Understand the different research approaches that sustain the effectiveness and efficacy of such treatments.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Franklin, M. E., & Foa, E. B. (2007). Cognitive behavioral treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. In P. E. Nathan & J. M. Gorman (Eds.), A guide to treatments that work (pp.431-226). New York: Oxford.<br />Hembree, E. A., & Foa, E. B. (2010). Cognitive behavioral treatments for PTSD. In G, M. Rosen & B. C. Frueh (Eds.), Clinician’s guide to posttraumatic stress disorder (pp. 177-204). New York: John Wiley.<br />UNIT 8: PARTIAL EXAM<br />UNIT 9: PSYCHODYNAMIC THERAPIES AND PSYCHOANALYSIS<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will review clinical research on psychodynamic therapies and psychoanalysis. Emphasis will be given to research designs used in those studies. Students will offer specific research recommendations for the improvement of these therapeutic interventions.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of unit 9, students will be able to: <br />1. Know the data research base of psychodynamic psychotherapies and <br /> psychoanalysis.<br />2. Know the research designs used in those studies <br />3. Present research recommendations for the improvement of such <br /> therapeutic interventions.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Anderson, E. M., & Lambert, M. J. (1995). Short-term dynamically oriented psychotherapy: A review and meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 15, 303-314.<br />Kudler, H. S., Krupnick, J. L., Blank, A. S., Herman, J. L., & Horowitz, M. (2009). <br />Psychodynamic therapy for adults. En E. B. Foa, T. M. Keane, M. J. <br />Friedman, J. A. Cohen (Eds.), Effective treatments for PTSD (2nd Ed.)(pp. <br />346-369). New York: Guilford.<br />UNIT 10: MOOD DISORDERS: Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will know research supported psychotherapies that have demonstrated to be useful in the treatment of the mood disorders. The student is expected to examine such research reports and make recommendations concerning the next step in such research projects. Also, the student will be in a better position to inform his/her clinical practice with supported types of psychotherapies. This unit will emphasize the cognitive behavioral approaches.<br />Learning Objectives:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />1. Acquire knowledge about the specific cognitive-behavioral <br /> psychotherapies that have been supported in the research literature <br /> with major depression<br />Acquire knowledge about the conclusions reached by the different research approaches. <br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Craighead, W. E., Sheets, E. S., Brosse, A. L., & Ilardi, S. S. (2007). Psychosocial treatments for major depressive disorder. In P. E. Nathan & J. M. Gorman (Eds.), A guide to treatments that work (pp. 289-308). New York: Oxford.<br />Miklowitz, D. J., & Craighead, W. E. (2007). Psychosocial treatments for bipolar disorder. In P. E. Nathan & J. M. Gorman (Eds.), A guide to treatments that work (pp. 309-322). New York: Oxford.<br />UNIT 11: MOOD DISORDERS: Interpersonal Psychotherapy<br />Upon successful completion of unit 11, students will know the empirically supported psychotherapies for mood disorders. Emphasis will be given to the interpersonal approach.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Discuss the interpersonal approach to the treatment of mood disorders and the research that supports this approach.<br />2. Discuss the psychotherapy research literature as it pertains to the <br /> interpersonal approach and the effects of these therapeutic <br /> interventions.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Seligman, L., & Reichnberg, L. W. (2007). Mood disorders. In L. Seligman & l. W. <br />Reichenberg (Eds.), Selecting effective treatments (pp.180-232). New <br />York: Wiley.<br />Rosselló, J., & Bernal, G. (1999). The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral and interpersonal treatments for depression in Puerto Rican adolescents. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 67, 734-745.<br />Jacobson, C. M., & Mufson, L. (2010). Treating adolescent depression using interpersonal psychotherapy. En J. R. Weisz & A. E. Kazdin (Eds.), Evidence-based psychotherapies for children and adolescents (pp.140-155). New York: Guilford.<br />UNIT 12: CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: Internalizing Disorders<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will have comprehensively reviewed the psychotherapy research literature concerning children and adolescents. Emphasis will be given to such issues as the efficacy versus effectiveness of the research designs; contrast between psychotherapy and medications and specific techniques supported in empirical research.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Contrast the relative effects of medications and psychotherapy with specific treatment populations, specially internalizing disorders.<br />Describe specific techniques supported in empirical research with children and adolescents.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Carr, A. (2008). What works with children, adolescents and adults? London: Routledge.<br />Kazdin, A. E. (2004). Psychotherapy with children and adolescents. In M. J. Lambert (Ed.), Handbook of psychotherapy and behavior change (pp. 543-589). New York: Wiley.<br />Corcoran, J. (2011). Mental health treatment for children and adolescents. New York: Oxford University Press.<br />UNIT 13: CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: Externalizing Disorders<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to understand research strategies of psychotherapy with children and adolescents. <br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />1. Critically evaluate research studies concerning psychotherapy with <br /> children an adolescents.<br />2. Analyze and understand empirically supported specific treatment <br />interventions with children and adolescents, specially externalizing disorders.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Corcoran, J. (2011). Mental health treatment for children and adolescents. New York: Oxford University Press.<br />Fonagy, P., et al. (1994). The efficacy of psychoanalysis for children with disruptive disorders. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 33, 45-55.<br />UNIT 14: CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: Therapy for Attention Deficit <br />Hyperactive Disorder.<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to understand evidence-based strategies of psychotherapy with children and adolescents that present a ADHD. <br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />1. Critically evaluate research studies concerning psychotherapy with <br /> children an adolescents.<br />2. Analyze and understand empirically supported specific treatment <br />interventions with children and adolescents, specially with ADHD.<br />ASSIGNED READING:<br />Hinshaw, S. P., Klein, R. G., & Abikoff, H. B. (2007). Childhood attention/hyperactive disorder: nonpharmacological treatments and theircombination with medication. In p. E. Nathan & J. M. Gorman (Eds.),A `guide to treatments that work (pp. 3-28). New York: Oxford University Press.<br />UNIT 15: TREATMENT AND RESEARCH QUESTIONS<br />Upon completion of this unit, students will understand the relative importance of empirically supported psychotherapies. Such issues as the cultural adaptation of such therapies to Hispanic populations and the issue of the efficacy and effectiveness of research-based psychotherapies will be discussed.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />1. Define cultural adaptation <br />2. Explain cultural adaptation <br />3. Discuss efficacy and effectiveness of research based psychotherapies<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Miranda, J., Bernal, G., Lau, A., Kohn, L., Hwang, W.C., & LaFromboise, T. (2005). State of the science on psychosocial interventions for ethnic minorities. In S. Nolen-Hoeksema, T. D. Cannon & T. Widiger (Eds.), Annual review of clinical psychology (pp. 113-1142). Palo Alto: California: Annual Reviews.<br />Jiménez Chaffey, M. I., Bernal, G., & Rosselló, J. (2009). Clinical case study: CBT for depression in a Puerto Rican adolescent: Challenges and variability in treatment response. Depression and Anxiety, 26, 98-103. <br />Wiltsey, S., & DeRubeis, R. J. (2006). Research patients and clinical trials are <br />frequently representative of clinical practice. In J. C. Norcross, L. E. Beutler & R. F. Levant (Eds.), Evidence based practices in mental health (pp. 171-179). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.<br />UNIT 16: FINAL EXAM<br />REFERENCES<br />Corcoran, J. (2011). Mental health treatment for children and adolescents. New York: Oxford University Press.<br /> Weisz, J. R., & Kazdin, A. E. (2010). (Eds.), Evidence-based psychotherapies for children and adolescents . New York: Guilford.<br />Lambert, M. J. (2004). Handbook of psychotherapy and behavior change. New <br />York: Wiley.<br />Nathan, P. E., & Gorman, J. M. (Eds.) (2007). A guide to treatments that work (3rd . Ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.<br />Norcross, J. C., Beutler, L. E. & Levant, R. F. (Eds.) (2006) Evidence based <br />practices in mental Health. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.<br /> Roth, A., & Fonagy, P. (2005). What works for whom? A critical review of <br />psychotherapy research. New York: Guilford.<br /> Norcross, J. C., Beutler, L. E., & Levant, R. F. (2008). (Eds.), Evidence based <br />practices in mental health. Washington, DC: American PsychologicalAssociation.<br />Revised by: Dr. Alfonso Martínez-Taboas (February, 2011)<br />