Master syllabus psyc 617 rev 1 2010

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Master syllabus psyc 617 rev 1 2010

  1. 1. 1 CARLOS ALBIZU UNIVERSITY SAN JUAN CAMPUS MASTER SYLLABUS PSYC-617: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES OF PSYCHOTHERAPYCREDITS: 3 CONTACT HOURS: 45COURSE DESCRIPTIONThe purpose of this course is to advance the knowledge base and therapeutic skills inpsychotherapy. Application and integration of therapeutic models in the management ofclinical cases will be emphasized. The integration of theory and practice in theapplication of techniques will be stressed. Also, the student will be exposed to theepistemological and scientific bases of the psychotherapy process. We will discusscritical issues on the effectiveness and efficacy of different types of psychotherapy.PRE-REQUISITESPSYC-515: Comparative Theories of Personality and Psychotherapy; PSYC-516:Techniques of PsychotherapyCOURSE OBJECTIVESUpon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate competence in case conceptualization and therapeutic management. 2. Analyze different models of case conceptualization and management, and discuss their implications to clinical practice. 3. Apply integrative models in the management of clinical cases. 4. Demonstrate knowledge in the scientific standing of different forms of psychotherapy, in terms of their effectiveness and efficacy. 5. Know and distinguish the underlying epistemological basis of different types of case conceptualizations.REQUIRED TEXT BOOKSBernal, G. & A. Martínez-Taboas (Eds.), (2007). Teoría y práctica de la psicoterapia en Puerto Rico. Hato Rey, PR: Publicaciones Puertorriqueñas.Link: http://www.publicacionespr.com/cgi-bin/show_libro.cgi?id=294ISBN: 1-932243-62-3Gabbard, G.O., Holmes, J., & Beck, J.S. (Eds.). (2007). Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy. USA: Oxford University Press.Link: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-
  2. 2. 2 keywords=Oxford+textbook+of+Psychotherapy.&x=18&y=19ISBN: 978-0-19-852064-1Snyder, C. R., & Ingram, R. E. (Eds.) (2000). Handbook of psychological change. New York: Wiley.Link: http://www.amazon.com/Handbook-Psychological-Change-Psychotherapy- Processes/dp/0471241911ISBN: 978-0-471-24191-1ITINERARY OF CLASS UNITS Unit 1: Conceptualization in psychotherapy: A review Unit 2: Cultural sensitive psychotherapy Unit 3: Advanced techniques in psychotherapy: Hypnotic techniques Unit 4: Advanced techniques in psychotherapy: The use of forgiveness, acceptance and mindfulness in psychotherapy Unit 5: The use of integrative models in psychotherapy Unit 6: The use of evidence-based psychotherapy with special populations: Panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder Unit 7: Mit-term examination Unit 8: The use of evidence-based psychotherapy with special populations: Major Depressive disorder Unit 9: The use of evidence-based psychotherapy with special populations: Crisis intervention, trauma, and brief psychotherapy Unit 10: The use of evidence-based psychotherapy with special populations: Women and GLBT issues in psychotherapy Unit 11: Issues related to the Therapist-Client relationship such as: transference and countertranference Unit 12: Managing the difficult client: Resistance in psychotherapy. Unit 13: Psychotherapy research in clinical practice Unit 14: Final Examination
  3. 3. 3COURSE CONTACT HOURSProfessors who teach the course must divide the contact hours the following way:1. Face-to-face time in the classroom must not be less than 40.0 hours (16 classes, 2.5 hours each class).2. For the remaining hours (5 hours), students will conduct research projects or homework outside the classroom. These projects or homework will include, but are not limited to, case conceptualizations, research paper, or case analysis.METHODOLOGYThe specific methodology will be selected by the professor who offers the course. Thesetechniques could include, but are not limited to: conferences by the professor, groupdiscussions of assigned reading, class research projects, student presentations, individualmeetings with student presentations, and subgroups in the classroom.EDUCATIONAL TECHNIQUESThe professor who offers the course will select the specific educational techniques.These techniques could include, but are not limited to: debates, practical demonstrations,films/videos/DVD, simulations, slide shows utilizing PowerPoint type software, forums,and virtual chat discussions.EVALUATIONThe specific methodology will be selected by the professor who offers the course. Thesemethodologies could include, but are not limited to: term papers, projects, literaturereviews, exams and class presentations.RESEARCH COMPETENCIESAlthough this course has been designed to develop mainly clinical skills, it also intends todevelop the following research competencies for Ph.D. and Psy.D. students: 1. Formulate a treatment plan that is consonant with the present clinical guidelines on the differential effectiveness of psychotherapy. 2. The student will explore the research literature on the effectiveness of psychotherapy with targeted symptoms and special populations. 3. The student will examine the empirical literature on the process of psychotherapeutic change and its relationship with an effective outcome in individual cases.
  4. 4. 4ATTENDANCE POLICYClass attendance is mandatory for all students. After two unexcused absences, thestudent will be dropped from the class, unless the professor recommends otherwise.When a student misses a class, he/she is responsible for the material presented in class.AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA)Students that need special accommodations should request them directly to the professorduring the first week of class.
  5. 5. 5 COURSE UNITSUNIT 1: CONCEPTUALIZATION IN PSYCHOTHERAPY: A REVIEWUpon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the similarities anddifferences in the basic assumptions behind the principal theoretical models inpsychotherapy. Emphasis will be given to the ways in which each school of thoughtcontributes to a new understanding of normal and abnormal human behavior. Theintegration of the models will be explored. Also, the student will be exposed to thescientific and epistemological work of Kuhn, Laudan, Lakatos, and others.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the major differences and similarities in the basic assumptions about human behavior implicit in the principal schools of therapeutic theory and practice of psychotherapy. 2. Analyze the different epistemological and methodological approaches that characterize the principal schools of psychotherapy. 3. Analyze the influence of culture upon models of psychotherapy. 4. Analyze and interpret the ways in which the different models complement each other and how they can be integrated in the practice of psychotherapy.ASSIGNED READINGS:Prochaska, J. O. (2000). Change at different stages. In C. R. Snyder & R. E. Ingram (Eds.), Handbook of psychological change (pp. 109-127). New York: Wiley.Westen, D. (2000). Integrative psychotherapy: Integrating psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral theory and technique. In C. R. Snyder & R. E. Ingram (Eds.), Handbook of psychological change (pp. 217-242). New York: Wiley.
  6. 6. 6UNIT 2: CULTURAL SENSITIVE PSYCHOTHERAPYUpon successful completion of this unit, students will develop sensitivity and competence towork with diversity issues in the therapeutic relationship. The place of cultural influences will beillustrated with case examples.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Discuss epistemological issues about the way that clinical knowledge is interpreted during the initial evaluation. 2. Discuss the empirical literature on how biases and conceptual prejudices can affect the initial evaluation of a client. 3. Analyze how a biopsychosocial approach can enrich the conceptualization of a case. 4. Discuss how cultural variables and individual differences must be included in any case conceptualization.ASSIGNED READINGS:Gabbard, G.O. (Ed.), Holmes, J. (Ed.), & Beck, J.S. (Ed.). (2007). Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy. USA: Oxford University Press.  Chapter 36-Cross cultural psychotherapyFoulks, E. F. (2002). Cultural issues of psychotherapy. In M. Hersen & W. Sledge (Eds.), Encyclopedia of psychotherapy (pp. 603-614). New York: Academic Press.Sue, W.D. & Sue, D. (2008). Counseling the culturally diverse: Theory and practice. (5nd ed.). New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons.  Chapter 7- Culturally appropriate Intervention Strategies  Chapter 13- Minority group therapists: Working with majority and other minority clients
  7. 7. 7UNIT 3: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN PSYCHOTHERAPY: HYPNOTIC TECHNIQUESUpon successful completion of this unit, students will learn various hypnotic techniques.Through the discussion of current research and empirically-based studies, students will be able toidentify the appropriate use of the techniques.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the various conditions and disorders that may be treated with hypnotic techniques. 2. Discuss and analyze the empirical literature regarding the use of hypnotic techniques. 3. Analyze the effectiveness of hypnosis in psychological treatment.ASSIGNED READINGS:Alladin, A., Sabatini, L. & Amundson, J.K. (2007). What should we mean by empirical validation in hypnotherapy: Evidence-based practice in clinical hypnosis. Special issue: Evidence-based practice clinical hypnosis--part 1. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 55(2), 115-130.Elkins, G., Marcus, J. & Bates, J. (2006). Intensive hypnotherapy for smoking cessation: A prospective study. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 54(3), 303-315.Gabbard, G.O. (Ed.), Holmes, J. (Ed.), & Beck, J.S. (Ed.). (2007). Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy. USA: Oxford University Press. ChapterGezundhajt, H. (2007). An evolution of the historical origins of hypnotism prior to the twentieth century: Between spirituality and subconscious. Contemporary Hypnosis, 24(4), 178-194.Gottsegen, D.N. (2003). Curing bedwetting on the spot: A review of one-session cures. Clinical Pediatrics, 42(3), 273-275.
  8. 8. 8UNIT 4: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN PSYCHOTHERAPY: THE USE OF FORGIVENESS, ACCEPTANCE AND MINDFULNESS IN PSYCHOTHERAPYUpon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the concepts ofmindfulness, forgiveness and acceptance within the therapeutic process. Students willunderstand the impact the use of forgiveness, acceptance and mindfulness has in theclient.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Explain the basic assumptions presented about the use of this approach in psychotherapy. 2. Apply and discuss the approach and techniques that have a scientific and research support. 3. Discuss the psychotherapeutic impact and changes that may occur after the intervention.ASSIGNED READINGS:Anderson, Nicole D.; Lau, Mark A.; Segal, Zindel, V. (2007). Mindfulness-based stress reduction and attentional control. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 14(6), 449-463.Davis L.W, Strasburger, A.M., & Brown L.F. (2007). Mindfulness: an intervention for anxiety in schizophrenia. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services, 45(11), 22-29.Schure, M.B., Christopher, J. & Christopher, S. (2008). Mind–body medicine and the art of self-care: Teaching mindfulness to counseling students through yoga, meditation, and qigong Journal of Counseling & Development. 86, 47-56.Teasdale, J.D., Williams, J. & Mark G.(2000). Prevention of relapse/recurrence in major depression by mindfullness-based cognitive therapy. Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology, 68(4), 615-623.Greenberg, L.J, Warwar, S.H. & Malcolm, W.M. (2008). Differential effects of emotion- focused therapy and psychoeducation in facilitating forgiveness and letting go of emotional injuries. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55(2), 185-196.Wade, N.G., Johnson, C.V. & Meyer, J.E (2008).Understanding concerns about interventions to promote forgiveness: A review of the literature. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 45(1), 88-102.
  9. 9. 9UNIT 5: THE USE OF INTEGRATIVE MODELS IN PSYCHOTHERAPYUpon successful completion of this unit, students will understand how to construct a systematicintegration of different theoretical contributions. The student will explore and understand theepistemological and scientific basis of such integrative efforts.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Explain the basic assumptions of different systems of psychotherapy, which promote the integration of different levels of analysis in the psychotherapy process. 2. Apply and discuss those integrative models that have a scientific and research support. 3. Compare and contrast the similarities, differences and complementary elements of integrate models and their implications for case conceptualization, evaluation and therapeutic interventions. 4. Design an integrated treatment plan with emphasis on a clinical conceptualization that is testable.ASSIGNED READINGS:Bernal, G. & A. Martínez-Taboas (Eds.), (2005). Teoría y práctica de la psicoterapia en Puerto Rico. Hato Rey, PR: Publicaciones Puertorriqueñas. Chapter 8Gabbard, G.O. (Ed.), Holmes, J. (Ed.), & Beck, J.S. (Ed.). (2007). Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy. USA: Oxford University Press. Chapter 10Kazdin, A. E. (2001). Progression of therapy research and clinical application of treatment require better understanding of the change process. Clinical Psychology, 8, 143-151.Stricker, G., & Gold, J. (2003). Integrative approaches to psychotherapy. In A. S. Gurman & S. B. Messer (Eds.), Essential psychotherapies (pp.317-349). New York: Guilford.
  10. 10. 10UNIT 6: THE USE OF EVIDENCE-BASED PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH SPECIAL POPULATIONS: PANIC DISORDER AND GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDERUpon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the treatments mostcommonly used to treat panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. Students willreview current literature and empirically-based interventions.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the main and key empirical and clinical findings on the effectiveness of psychotherapy for panic and anxiety disorders. 2. Discuss the importance of clinical conceptualizations and interventions anchored in the empirical outcome research for anxiety and panic disorders. 3. Apply effective techniques to treat anxiety and panic disorders.ASSIGNED READINGS:Bernal, G. & A. Martínez-Taboas (Eds.), (2005). Teoría y práctica de la psicoterapia en Puerto Rico. Hato Rey, PR: Publicaciones Puertorriqueñas.  Chapter 10- Trastorno de pánico: Alternativas psicoterapéuticasBotella, C., García-Palacios, A., Villa, H., Baños, a.m., Quero, S., Alcañiz, M. & Riva, G. (2007). Virtual reality exposure in the treatment of panic disorder and agoraphobia: A controlled study. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 14(3), 164-175.Carmin, C.N. & Albano, A.M. (2003). Clinical management of anxiety disorders in psychiatric settings: Psychologys impact on evidence-based treatment of children and adults. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, 34 (2), 170-177.Gabbard, G.O. (Ed.), Holmes, J. (Ed.), & Beck, J.S. (Ed.). (2007). Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy. USA: Oxford University Press.  Chapter 13- Anxiety disordersKenardy, J., Robinson, S. & Dob, R. (2005).Cognitive behavior therapy for panic disorder: Long-term follow-up. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 34 (2), 75-78.Newman, M.G. & Stiles, W.B.(2006) Therapeutic factors in treating anxiety disorders. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 62(6), 649-659.
  11. 11. 11UNIT 7: THE USE OF EVIDENCE-BASED PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH SPECIAL POPULATIONS: MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDERUpon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the treatments mostcommonly used to treat major depressive disorder. Students will review current literatureand empirically-based interventions.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the main and key empirical and clinical findings on the effectiveness of psychotherapy for major depressive disorder. 2. Discuss the importance of clinical conceptualizations and interventions anchored in the empirical outcome research of major depressive disorder. 3. Apply effective techniques to treat major depressive disorder.ASSIGNED READINGS:Breslin, F.C., Gnam, W., Franche, R.L. (2006) Depression and activity limitations: examining gender differences in the general population. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 41(8), 648-655.Cabassa, L.J. & Zayas, L.H. (2007). Latino immigrants intentions to seek depression care. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 77(2), 231-242.Eguiluz, I., Baca-Baldomero, E., Álvarez, E., Bousoño, M., Martín, M., Roca, M. & Urretavizcaya, M. (2007). Psicoterapia en la depresión a largo plazo. Actas Españolas de Psiquiatría, 36, p26-34.Gabbard, G.O., Holmes, J., & Beck, J.S. (Eds.) (2007). Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy. USA: Oxford University Press.  Chapter 11- Cognitive-behavior therapy for mood disorders  Chapter 12-The psychoanalytic/psychodynamic approach to depressive disorders
  12. 12. 12UNIT 8: THE USE OF EVIDENCE-BASED PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH SPECIAL POPULATIONS: CRISIS INTERVENTION, TRAUMA AND BRIEF PSYCHOTHERAPYUpon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the treatments mostcommonly used in a crisis intervention and after trauma. Students will learn briefstrategies to address the needs of patients in crisis. Students will review current literatureand empirically-based interventions.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the main and key empirical and clinical findings on the effectiveness of crisis intervention, trauma and brief psychotherapy. 2. Discuss the importance of clinical conceptualizations and interventions anchored in the empirical outcome research of crisis interventions. 3. Apply effective and appropriate techniques when intervening in a crisis, dealing with trauma and providing brief psychotherapy.ASSIGNED READINGS:Amaya-Jackson, L. & DeRosa, R.R. (2007). Treatment considerations for clinicians in applying evidence-based practice to complex presentations in child trauma. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 20 (4), 379-390.Blodgett, C., Behan, K. & Erp, M. (2008). Crisis intervention for children and caregivers exposed to intimate partner violence. Best Practices in Mental Health: An International Journal, 4(1), 74-91.Dass-Brailsford, P. (2008).After the storm: Recognition, recovery, and reconstruction. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 39(1), 24-30.Gabbard, G.O. (Ed.), Holmes, J. (Ed.), & Beck, J.S. (Ed.). (2007). Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy. USA: Oxford University Press.  Chapter 43- Brief and time-limited psychotherapyHobfoll, S.E., Watson, P. & Bell, C.C. (2007). Five essential elements of immediate and mid-term mass trauma intervention: Empirical evidence. Psychiatry: Interpersonal and Biological Processes, 70(4), 283-315.Lamagna, J. & Gleiser, K.A. (2007). Building a secure internal attachment: An intra- relational approach to ego strengthening and emotional processing with chronically traumatized clients. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 8 (1), 25-52.Stultz, J. (2006). Integrating Exposure Therapy and Analytic Therapy in Trauma
  13. 13. 13 Treatment. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 76(4), 482-488.UNIT 9: THE USE OF EVIDENCE-BASED PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH SPECIAL POPULATIONS: WOMEN AND GLBT ISSUES IN PSYCHOTHERAPYUpon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the contemporaryliterature, which has examined bias and sex role stereotyping of women and GLBT clients inthe theory and practice of psychotherapy. Alternative theoretical and intervention strategieswill be discussed.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the main and key empirical and clinical findings on the effectiveness of psychotherapy with women and GLBT population. 2. Discuss the importance of clinical conceptualizations and interventions anchored in the empirical outcome research with women and GLBT population. 3. Discuss the major conceptual biases inherent in the theory and practice of psychotherapy that discriminate against women and GLBT clients. 4. Analyze the empirical and epistemological knowledge to identify such biases. 5. Analyze alternative theoretical intervention strategies that are sensitive to the experience of women and GLBT population.ASSIGNED READINGS:Brown, L. S. (2000). Feminist therapy. In C. R. Snyder & R. E. Ingram (Eds.), Handbook of Psychological Change (pp. 358-380). New York: Wiley.Dimen, M. (2003). In the zone of ambivalence. In Sexuality, Intimacy, Power, Hillsdale, New Jersey: The Analytic Press, Inc. PublishersGabbard, G.O. (Ed.), Holmes, J. (Ed.), & Beck, J.S. (Ed.) (2007). Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy. USA: Oxford University Press.  Chapter 23- Counseling sexual minorities  Chapter 25- Counseling women  Chapter 34- Gender issues in psychotherapy  Chapter 35- Sexual orientation and psychotherapyGray-Little, B., & Kaplan, D. (2000). Race and ethnicity in psychotherapy research. In C. R. Snyder & R. E. Ingram (Eds.), Handbook of psychological change (pp. 591-613). New York: Wiley.Nadelson, C. C., & Notman, M. T. (2001). Gender issues in psychiatric treatment. In H. J. Gabbard (Ed.), Treatments of psychiatric disorders (pp. 21-40). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.
  14. 14. 14Sherry, A. (2007). Internalized homophobia and adult attachment: Implications for clinical practice. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training. 44 (2), 219–225.Kilgore, H., Sidemean, L., Amin, K., Baca, L. & Bohanske, B. (2005). Psychologists’ attitudes and therapeutic approaches toward gay, lesbian and bisexual issues continue to improve: An Update. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 42(3), 395–400.UNIT 10: ISSUES RELATED TO THE THERAPIST-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP SUCH AS: TRANSFERENCE AND COUNTERTRANSFERENCEUpon the successful completion of this unit, students will understand the impact in treatment theTherapist-Client relationship has and its multiple manifestations. Transference and countertransference will be discussed and examined.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Understand the impact the Client-Therapist relationship has in the therapeutic process. 2. Understand the concepts of transference and countertransference. 3. Discuss the clinical manifestation of transference phenomena in the process of psychotherapy. 4. Discuss management techniques in working with Client-Therapist relationship and transference reactions and apply them to case discussions.ASSIGNED READINGS:Karver, M., Shirk, S. & Handelsman, J.B. (2008). Relationship processes in youth psychotherapy: Measuring alliance, alliance-building behaviors, and client involvement. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 16(1), 15-28.Davis, T. (2007). The relevance of the Freudian concept of Transference to existential psychotherapy. Existential Analysis: Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis,18(2), 348-357.
  15. 15. 15UNIT 11: MANAGING THE DIFFICULT CLIENT: RESISTANCE IN PSYCHOTHERAPYUpon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the phenomena on resistance,its clinical manifestations and management issues. Resistant will be discussed within a broadspectrum of clinical phenomena, covering variables mediating drop-out and noncompliance.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Understand and define the concept of resistance in psychotherapy. 2. Compare and contrast the different manifestations and meanings of resistance in psychotherapy. 3. Discuss the empirical and conceptual bases of resistance. 4. Apply the knowledge acquired to cases discussed in class.ASSIGNED READINGS:Kohlenberg, R. J. & Vandenberghe, L. (2007). Treatment-resistant OCD, inflated responsibility, and the therapeutic relationship: Two case examples. Psychology & Psychotherapy: Theory, Research & Practice, 80(3,) 455-465.Leahy, R. L. (2001). Models of resistance. New York: Guilford.McDermott, K., & Sledge, W. H. (2002). Resistance. In M. Hersen & W. H. Sledge (Eds.), Encyclopedia of psychotherapy (pp. 547-552). New York: Academic Press.UNIT 12: PSYCHOTHERAPY RESEARCH IN CLINICAL PRACTICEUpon successful completion of this unit, students will understand psychotherapyresearch, with emphasis in process, outcome, efficacy and effectiveness research.LEARNING OBJECTIVES:Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the issue of manualization. 2. Discuss how to implement a treatment manual in effectiveness and efficacy research. 3. Explain how psychotherapy research is conducted and the value of its results to the clinician. 4. Explain different and alternative ways of constructing scientific knowledge.ASSIGNED READINGS:
  16. 16. 16Bernal, G. & A. Martínez-Taboas (Eds.), (2005). Teoría y práctica de la psicoterapia en Puerto Rico. Hato Rey, PR: Publicaciones Puertorriqueñas.  Chapter 25- Investigación de las psicoterapias: Hallazgos, avances y controversiasChristophersen, E. R., & Mortweet, S. L. (2001). Treatments that work with children. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Gabbard, G.O., Holmes, J., & Beck, J.S. (Eds.). (2007). Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy. USA: Oxford University Press.  Chapters 37- Implications of research in cognitive neuroscience for psychodynamic psychotherapy  Chapter 38- Psychotherapy researchNathan, P., & Gorman, J. M. (2002). A guide to treatments that work. New York: Oxford University Press.
  17. 17. 17 REFERENCESAlladin, A., Sabatini, L. & Amundson, J.K. (2007). What should we mean by empirical validation in hypnotherapy: Evidence-based practice in clinical hypnosis. Special issue: Evidence- based practice clinical hypnosis--part 1. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 55(2), 115-130.Amaya-Jackson, L. & DeRosa, R.R. (2007). Treatment considerations for clinicians in applying evidence-based practice to complex presentations in child trauma. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 20 (4), 379-390.Anderson, Nicole D.; Lau, Mark A.; Segal, Zindel, V. (2007). Mindfulness-based stress reduction and attentional control. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 14(6), 449-463.Bernal, G. & A. Martínez-Taboas (Eds.), (2005). Teoría y práctica de la psicoterapia en Puerto Rico. Hato Rey, PR: Publicaciones Puertorriqueñas.Blodgett, C., Behan, K. & Erp, M. (2008). Crisis intervention for children and caregivers exposed to intimate partner violence. Best Practices in Mental Health: An International Journal, 4(1), 74-91.Botella, C., García-Palacios, A., Villa, H., Baños, R.M., Quero, S., Alcañiz, M. & Riva, G. (2007). Virtual reality exposure in the treatment of panic disorder and agoraphobia: A controlled study. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 14(3), 164-175.Breslin, F.C., Gnam, W., Franche, R.L. (2006) Depression and activity limitations: examining gender differences in the general population. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 41(8), 648-655.Brown, L. S. (2000). Feminist therapy. In C. R. Snyder & R. E. Ingram (Eds.), Handbook of of psychological change. New York: Wiley.Cabassa, L.J. & Zayas, L.H. (2007). Latino immigrants intentions to seek depression care. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 77(2), 231-242.Carmin, C.N. & Albano, A.M. (2003). Clinical management of anxiety disorders in psychiatric settings: Psychologys impact on evidence-based treatment of children and adults. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, 34 (2), p170-177.Christophersen, E. R., & Mortweet, S. L. (2001). Treatments that work with children. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Dass-Brailsford, P. (2008).After the storm: Recognition, recovery, and reconstruction. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 39(1), 24-30.Davis L.W, Strasburger, A.M. & Brown L.F. (2007). Mindfulness: an intervention for anxiety in schizophrenia. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services, 45(11), 22-29. Davis, T. (2007). The relevance of the Freudian concept of Transference to existential psychotherapy. Existential Analysis: Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, 18(2), 348-357.Dimen, M. (2003). Sexuality, Intimacy, Power. New Jersey: Analytic Press.
  18. 18. 18Eguiluz, I., Baca Baldomero, E., Álvarez, E., Bousoño, M., Martín, M., Roca, M. & Urretavizcaya, M. (2007). Psicoterapia en la depresión a largo plazo. Actas Españolas de Psiquiatría, 36, 26-34.Elkins, G., Marcus, J. & Bates, J. (2006). Intensive hypnotherapy for smoking cessation: A prospective study. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 54(3), 303-315.Encyclopedia of psychotherapy (pp. 603-614). New York: Academic Press.Foulks, E. F. (2002). Cultural issues of psychotherapy. In M. Hersen & W. Sledge (Eds.),Gabbard, G.O., Holmes, J., & Beck, J.S. (Eds.). (2007). Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy. USA: Oxford University Press.Gezundhajt, H. (2007). An evolution of the historical origins of hypnotism prior to the twentieth century: Between spirituality and subconscious. Contemporary Hypnosis, 24(4), 178-194.Gottsegen, D.N. (2003). Curing bedwetting on the spot: A review of one-session cures. Clinical Pediatrics, 42(3), 273Gray-Little, B., & Kaplan, D. (2000). Race and ethnicity in psychotherapy research. In C. R. Snyder & R. E. Ingram (Eds.), Handbook of psychological change (pp. 591-613). New York: Wiley.Greenberg, L.J, Warwar, S.H. & Malcolm, W.M. (2008). Differential effects of emotion-focused therapy and psychoeducation in facilitating forgiveness and letting go of emotional injuries. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55(2), 185-196.Hobfoll, S.E., Watson, P. & Bell, C.C. (2007). Five essential elements of immediate and mid- term mass trauma intervention: Empirical evidence. Psychiatry: Interpersonal and Biological Processes, 70(4), 283-315.Karver, M., Shirk, S. & Handelsman, J.B. (2008). Relationship processes in youth psychotherapy: Measuring alliance, alliance-building behaviors, and client involvement. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 16(1), 15-28.Kazdin, A. E. (2001). Progression of therapy research and clinical application of treatment require better understanding of the change process. Clinical Psychology, 8, 143-151.Kenardy, J., Robinson, S. & Dob, R. (2005).Cognitive behavior therapy for panic disorder: Long- term follow-up. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 34 (2), p75-78.Kilgore, H., Sidemean, L., Amin, K., Baca, L. & Bohanske, B. (2005). Psychologists’ attitudes and therapeutic approaches toward gay, lesbian and bisexual issues continue to improve: An Update. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training. 42(3), 395–400.Kohlenberg, R. J. and Vandenberghe, L. (2007). Treatment-resistant OCD, inflated responsibility, and the therapeutic relationship: Two case examples. Psychology & Psychotherapy: Theory, Research & Practice, 80(3,) 455-465.Lamagna, J. & Gleiser, K.A.. (2007). Building a secure internal attachment: An intra-relational approach to ego strengthening and emotional processing with chronically traumatized
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  20. 20. 20Revised by: Dr. Alfonso Martínez-Taboas (March, 2004)Revised by: Dr. Monique Jiménez and Dr. Alfonso Martinez-Taboas (May, 2008)Revised by: Dr. Monique Jiménez (January 27, 2010)

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