Fall 2012 - Faculty Training PT 1.pptx

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  • NicoleSome students are directly admitted and able to do well with tutoring support.But some students (as John said last week) come in with 88 and still need considerable supportIf students are coming in a range of 72-90, we have a high level of expectation that they will make the leap needed to be successful while enrolled primarily in General Ed/Major courses called content
  • CISA Core Values, Standards, and Practices: A message to our studentsWe—the faculty, staff, and administrators of CISA—see the following statements as the five (5) corevalues that form the foundation of the work that we do. Each one is followed by an explanation of thestandards we believe in and the practices we will employ during the coming year to help our studentssucceed:1.2.1. Students are our primary focus.Our students, along with their academic and personal success, are the central elements of theCenter for International Student Access. We actively serve the students enrolled in our first-yearprograms through customized academic programming, co-curricular activities, workshops,tutoring, mentoring, and personal adjustment counseling.1.2.2. Developing English language proficiency and successful cultural adjustment to Western educationalsystems are major goals for our students.We will use best practices and strategies for educating our students, taking full advantage of thewide-range of resources that Mason has to offer. Our goal is to provide our students with thenecessary tools for future success in their academic coursework and social enrichment asmultilingual speakers of English.1.2.3. Growth during the first year of collegiate study is a critical process that sets the stage for future success.Growth is a part of life; we act as guides to help students grow to their full academic potential,which requires that we provide both challenge and support. Our students will have experiences,assignments, and activities that may be very different or more demanding than what they‘veencountered in the past—therefore, individual effort, a willingness to try, and practicing newskills will be required from our students in order to reap the full benefits of the ACCESS program.This includes actively demonstrating personal and social responsibility skills in an increasinglyglobal community.1.2.4. Having high expectations for our students will lead to high achievement.Our desire is to elevate our students to their highest levels of achievement. More importantly, wewant our students to want this for themselves. We may ask for a lot, but we are also willing togive our best effort in return to our students. Students who successfully complete the ACCESSprogram will demonstrate hard work and commitment to their personal and academic goals.1.2.5. Respect and appreciation for all types of diversity is an integral part of our identity.Mason is recognized for its diversity and actively strives to demonstrate a commitment to itthrough its diversity statement and principles. CISA extends that respect to its students for theircultural backgrounds, experiences, and ways of understanding the world, and we actively seekways to foster opportunities for individuals in the Mason community to learn from and beenriched by our students. Further, we actively endeavor to increase the diversity of our students,CISA ACCESS Faculty Handbook 2011-2012 3faculty, and staff, and we strive to help our students to achieve the same appreciation and respectfor the different forms of diversity that members of our community bring to the institutionthrough interactions with both domestic and international students alike.
  • Fall 2012 - Faculty Training PT 1.pptx

    1. 1. Where Innovation is TraditionFall 2012 Faculty Training Day 1 – August 13, 2012
    2. 2. • 10:00AM ─ Introductions• 10:15AM ─ ACCESS Program Overview & Structure• 10:45AM ─ ACCESS Student Performance Requirements• 11:00AM ─ Introducing ACCESS Faculty Resources• 11:45AM ─ Break for Lunch• 12:30PM ─Working with Students with “Lower” English Levels, Part I• 1:30PM ─ Faculty reporting, grading expectations &• strategies to close the cultural gap• 2:15PM ─ Content & Language Support Team Group Meetings
    3. 3. History & Perspective
    4. 4. Purpose Mission• The primary purpose of the The Center for International Student center, working in close Access endeavors to be a resource and partnership with Mason’s advocate for international & immigrant academic departments and student academic needs. The Center will accomplish this by providing the English Language Institute, developmental support and is to combine the best elements acculturation to Western educational of teaching excellence in the styles in a manner that both respects areas of prescriptive English and celebrates individual student academic language support, culture and epistemology and prepares customized general education students for personal and academic courses and programming, and success. The Center’s ultimate goal is to specialized student support promote the development and retention services to create distinctive of well-rounded, culturally conscious, and civically engaged international programs for students with student-citizens who are able to international educational positively contribute to our local and backgrounds. global society.
    5. 5. Overview, Structure, and the Student Body
    6. 6. • ACCESS is designed for academically qualified undergraduate international students who could benefit from additional assistance in developing proficiency in the English language.• ACCESS allows freshmen to develop their academic English language skills while taking a full-time academic course load toward their Bachelors degree.
    7. 7.  Mason makes use of multiple language-supported, content-based instruction models  Theme-based: ESL uses content to introduce ELI linguistic concepts to aid student development  Adjunct model: ELI support faculty sits in ELI content class and provides supplemental & CISA instruction afterwards  Sheltered model: Content instructor teaching CISA modified content used to aid students in developing linguistic skills
    8. 8. • Identified by admissions staff for the program based on:  Meeting all general admissions requirements  Meeting alternative English proficiency requirement  Internet-based TOEFL: 68 (-20 points)  IELTS: 5.5 (-1.0) ELI Proficiency Exam: B1• Offered “provisional” admission
    9. 9. 1. Students are our primary focus.2. Developing English language proficiency and successful cultural adjustment to Western educational systems are major goals for our students.3. Growth during the first year of collegiate study is a critical process that sets the stage for future success.4. Having high expectations for our students will lead to high achievement.5. Respect and appreciation for all types of diversity is an integral part of our identity.
    10. 10. 12010080 Fall60 Spring40 Sophomore20 0 2010 Cohort 2011 Cohort 2012 Cohort
    11. 11. Using innovative team teaching Incorporating approach Peer Advising from successful Mason Undergrads Enhanced Freshman American English Transition Cultures Composition I to College I (3 credits) (3 credits) (1 credit) Public Mathematics* Speaking (3-4 credits) (3 credits + 1 credit) Offered with in-class and after-class language support Additional tutoring made available during afternoon and evening hours
    12. 12. Using innovative team teaching Incorporating approach Peer Advising from successful Mason Undergrads Enhanced Freshman English Research Transition Composition Methods to College II II (3 credits) (1 credit) (3 credits) World Major History Course (3 credits (2-3 credits) + 1 credit) Offered with in-class and after-class language support Additional tutoring made available during afternoon and evening hours
    13. 13. • Earn a minimum 2.0 GPA by the end of the year;• Earn a minimum grade of C or better in all courses; and• Pass the first Math course required in desired major.
    14. 14. • Completes 70% of required tasks and event attendance.• Portfolio designed for students to demonstrate foundations and skills for lifelong integrative learning, transfer, and creative and critical thinking.
    15. 15. • Electronic Language Acquisition Portfolio (e-LAP)• English Proficiency Assessment
    16. 16. Students are divided into cohorts of 20 (aka“clusters”) for class assignments (Section 1.3.4, p. 5) Course Sections Average Section Enrollment COMM 100 3 19 ENGH 121 5 19 HIST 125 1 40 PROV 099 5 1 PROV 103 AC1 3 20 PROV 104 AC1 2 20 PROV 105 AC1 3 19 to 38 PROV 110 AC1 1 20 UNIV 100 AC1 5 20
    17. 17. • Collaborative resources from multiple units/departments (Section 1.4.2, p. 6)• Teaching resources & feedback mechanisms
    18. 18. Student Affairs Administration Academic Affairs Advisory Boards DirectorAssistant Director Faculty Fellow Office Assistant BRIDGE Course SSAs Coordinators BRIDGE Course PASS Team Instructors Area Academic Units Coordinators ACCESS Course Program Support Coordinators Specialist ACCESS Course Instructors
    19. 19. Assistant Director Student Success Advisors• Coordinates PASS team: • Teaches UNIV 100  Leads PA, PE, PT selection, communications, • Advises & training ACCESS/BRIDGE  Participates in PLP selection & communication students• Coordinates UNIV 100 • Process documentation Curriculum, Instruction & Student Development related to student Portfolio progression• Coordinates Academic • Connects students with Advising• Official Staff Liaison to interventions as needed Academic Advising office
    20. 20. BRIDGE Coordinator LLC Coordinator• Coordinates co-curricular • Official liaison to Housing programming & Residence Life• Coordinates BRIDGE • Plans and executes Peer Scholars initiative holistic student• Coordinates Preparation engagement initiatives for Graduate Study transition course• Coordinates student progression resources (e.g., testing)
    21. 21. Communications & ProgramSupport Specialist Office Coordinator• Coordinates co-curricular • Manages all resource activities and events requests, satellite• Executes marketing and public locations, and office supplies relations materials • Manages personnel records &• Official liaison to University processes hiring Admissions documentation• Communications with • Manages financial records & prospective students processes funding requests Administrative Assistant • Support to the director • Executive Meeting planner
    22. 22. • Administration (Mason Hall, RM D217)  Faculty, Employees, Administrators• Student Services (Johnson Ctr, RM 133)  Students, PASS Team• Adjunct Faculty Offices (Innovation Hall, RM 215A)  Assigned Term, Adjunct & TAs
    23. 23. • Software systems• Resource Protocol (1.4.1, p. 5)  Resource protocols  Resource request form• Communications  Course coordinator/direct supervisor  SSA assigned to your cluster  Director
    24. 24. NOTE LOCATION CHANGES IN YELLOW• English – Anna Habib/Laurie Miller (MH D101)• Communication – James Steele/Esther Kim (MH D201A)• History – Steve Harris-Scott/Ghania Zgheib (MH D111)• American-Cultures – Melissa Ferro (IN 215A)• Freshman Transition – James Jones (MH D217)
    25. 25. Nicole SealeyTabitha WellsCISA@GMU.EDU703.993.4711MS 5D1

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