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Creating Our Own Pathways

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Universities with existing IEPs are being targeted by corporate educational services providers for partnerships, resulting in credit-bearing matriculation pathway programs for international students ...

Universities with existing IEPs are being targeted by corporate educational services providers for partnerships, resulting in credit-bearing matriculation pathway programs for international students who still require ESL support. In this colloquium, directors of various university-based IEPs in the United States share perspectives vis-à-vis their university-developed alternatives to corporate partnership models.

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  • TESOL’s Definition of a Colloquium:Colloquium (1 hour, 45 minutes): A forum for a group of scholars to formally present and discuss current TESOL issues. Presenters exchange papers in advance and formally respond to each other’s positions. The colloquium organizer is responsible for securing participants who represent various viewpoints in the field before submitting a proposal. A colloquium may not have more than seven panelists, including the leader. With 105 minutes total, I am proposing that, as facilitator, I open the colloquium with a brief introduction to the topic: say, 5-8 minutes. Each of the five of you would then have 12-15 minutes to present the ‘whys’ and ‘hows’ of your institutions’ home-grown pathway and/or bridge program alternatives to those of the corporate education service providers. This would allow for 20 minutes +/- of Q&A which I can help facilitate.  
  • TESOL’s Definition of a Colloquium:Colloquium (1 hour, 45 minutes): A forum for a group of scholars to formally present and discuss current TESOL issues. Presenters exchange papers in advance and formally respond to each other’s positions. The colloquium organizer is responsible for securing participants who represent various viewpoints in the field before submitting a proposal. A colloquium may not have more than seven panelists, including the leader. With 105 minutes total, I am proposing that, as facilitator, I open the colloquium with a brief introduction to the topic: say, 5-8 minutes. Each of the five of you would then have 12-15 minutes to present the ‘whys’ and ‘hows’ of your institutions’ home-grown pathway and/or bridge program alternatives to those of the corporate education service providers. This would allow for 20 minutes +/- of Q&A which I can help facilitate.  
  • Fall-WinterSpring Chemistry, Math + Chemistry writing support +Skills for College SuccessSummer 7 Drexel credits + Content Support + ELC Special topic of choice
  • Dan
  • Dan
  • Brief Description: 1st Year Experience with Language SupportPartnership between university Provost Office and it’s ELIUniversity & ELI facultyUses sheltered and adjunct-model coursesUses ACCUPLACER for internal testing and placementStudent’s Earn: 28 CreditsPathway: Students matriculate as sophomores the following year
  • Brief Description: 1st Year Experience with Language SupportPartnership between university Provost Office and it’s ELIUniversity & ELI facultyUses sheltered and adjunct-model coursesUses ACCUPLACER for internal testing and placementStudent’s Earn: 28 CreditsPathway: Students matriculate as sophomores the following year
  • Established “Center for International Student Access” in Fall 2010; located in Office of ProvostConnected to Institutional Infrastructure:English Language InstituteEnrollment Management-affiliated Offices (e.g., Admissions, Registrar)Academic unitsUniversity Life (e.g., Student Involvement, Immigration Services)Special Programs (e.g., Honors College, MSU)Resource Sharing“Initiative-based” budget modelSet asideSome of net revenues were reallocated to support specific internationalization effortsSelf-sustainingOut of state tuition rates + flat‐rate premium costsShort seminars set up as 0 credit courses, costing between $60‐250 each
  • Joint
  • Joint

Creating Our Own Pathways Creating Our Own Pathways Presentation Transcript

  • Program Administration IS Colloquium Creating Our Own Pathways: Institutional Alternatives to Corporate Partnership Models Carter Winkle, Barry University (Facilitator) Randy Hardwick, DePaul University Jacqueline McCafferty, Rowan University Scott Stevens, University of Delaware Tobie Hoffman, Drexel University Nicole Sealey, George Mason UniversityTESOL 2013 – Dallas, TX March 23, 2013 – 3:00pm – 4:45pm
  • Introduction: Carter Winkle Intro to Colloquium: Carter Winkle• Introduction of the Panel and Session Organization• Introduction of the Colloquium Topic in relation to my research • TESOL 2009 – Sheila Mullooly’s presentation • Exploratory Inquiry (Winkle, 2010) • Dissertation Thesis (Winkle, 2011) • A narrative inquiry into corporate unknowns: Faculty experiences concerning privatized-partnership matriculation pathway programs • Forthcoming Book (Winkle, 2013) • University Partnerships with the Corporate Sector: Faculty Experiences with For-Profit Matriculation Pathway Programs (Publisher: Brill)
  • Research Questions (Winkle, 2011) Introduction: Carter Winkle• How do English-language and academic-content faculty describe the impact of their institution’s privatized-partnership? • How do faculty… • …describe institutional status as being impacted by the privatized-partnership? • …experience implementation of the privatized- partnership? • …describe curricular and pedagogical autonomy as being impacted by the privatized-partnership? • …describe their beliefs concerning impact to students and host institutions as a result of the privatized-partnership?
  • Introduction: Carter WinklePrécis of Findings (Winkle, 2011)1. Continued feelings of marginalization by ELT Professionals2. Curricular and pedagogical autonomy largely retained • “Too much” autonomy in credit-bearing academic courses: inequivalency to mainstream counterparts: regional accreditation of academic programs and institutions at risk3. Disciplinary faculty teaching academic content lack support in meeting students’ cultural and linguistic needs • Perceived lower status of ELT professionals inhibiting this skilled resource from being utilized for this purpose4. Corporate-partner recruited students admitted to pathway programs are not prepared for credit-bearing academic work5. Repeated refrain: ”universities could have created matriculation pathway programs themselves,” without having to engage an outside corporate partner… …which brings us to this PAIS Colloquium session
  • Program Administration IS Colloquium Creating Our Own Pathways: Institutional Alternatives to Corporate Partnership Models Carter Winkle, Barry University (Facilitator) Randy Hardwick, DePaul University Jacqueline McCafferty, Rowan University Scott Stevens, University of Delaware Tobie Hoffman, Drexel University Nicole Sealey, George Mason UniversityTESOL 2013 – Dallas, TX March 23, 2013 – 3:00pm – 4:45pm
  • DePaul University: Randy HardwickDePaul University: Randy Hardwick Two Types of Pathways: ELA Certificate ELA Continuing Support• University Bridge • Several Pathways in Certificate Development • Proof of ELP for • Conditional admission undergraduate and based upon completion of graduate programs that part of ELA certificate require iBT 80 or ITP 500 program • Academic English • Continuing one- curriculum, not normed to course, non-credit ELA TOEFL or standardized test support through first year • Authentic university • Required Summer Term student experience focus ELA enrollment if needed
  • DePaul University: Randy Hardwick Contained Elective Model• ELA collaboration with Kellstadt Graduate School of Business to create Accounting 798 “Special Topics”• International students directed to enroll in “University Experience: Language and Business Culture”• Pilot project led to establishment of full-time language and culture position within Kellstadt Graduate School of Business• A similar approach under consideration for Chinese undergraduate cohort
  • DePaul University: Randy Hardwick A History of Collaboration• Newly Created Writing, Rhetoric & Discourse Department leads collaboration to develop Graduate Certificate in TESOL (2008). College of Education, Modern Languages Department and ELA involved in collaboration.• First-Year Writing “x” sections are created. Center for Multilingual Writing Research begun. Some faculty teaching in both degree and non-degree programs (2009 / 2010)• ELA faculty teaching some graduate courses in TESOL Certificate (pedagogical grammar, TESOL methods, second language acquisition).• New WRD faculty hires with special focus on second language issues. Close collaboration with ELA faculty to support students.• Working together now to design institutional pathway.
  • Some Ideas Under DePaul University: Randy Hardwick Consideration• Creation of an “AP-Style” approach to granting elective credit for U.B. Certificate, possibly via portfolio assessment• Concurrently taught capstone ELA Writing course aligned with first-year “x” section curriculum. Essentially, credit for the final writing course in the ELA sequence via separate course #.• Realignment of C.U.P. modules* within ELA sequence to facilitate undergraduate pathway. Requires close cross-faculty collaboration.*ELA electives that are the basis of approved Certificate of University Preparedness. Thiscertificate, though approved, has not been issued. One of its modules was the startingpoint for the Accounting 798 collaboration.
  • DePaul University: Randy HardwickMilestones Along the Way• 2010-12: International Student Support Program study to identify ways ELA expertise could be brought to bear in service to the wider range of international students at DePaul • Creation of Internet-based pronunciation workshop • Engaging International Students in University Classrooms presented at DePaul faculty conferences and TESOL conventions • Approval of Certificate of University Preparedness as proof of English Language Proficiency for undergraduates • Design & ultimate spinoff of language and culture electives for Kellstadt Graduate School of Business • Additional full-time teaching positions and a full-time associate director for curriculum • Formation of a working group in partnership with other departments to explore further undergraduate pathway opportunities
  • Pathway Development Lessons DePaul University: Randy Hardwick Learned Along the Way• One size does not fit all – maintain flexibility by working with things that are under your control.• Navigate institutional “silos” – identify key programs’ needs and understand their admission processes.• Raise awareness of the language academy – stress faculty qualifications and availability as resource to colleagues.• Educate other departments about current international education practices – stress quality of student experience.• Gather data about your current students – statistics impress; but remember to put a face on them when possible.• Get buy-in from ELA faculty to support accountability needed to support successful pathways.
  • DePaul University: Randy Hardwick External Partners• Developing other pathway partners can protect diversity within the IEP.• Lets language students who are not conditionally admitted know that schools are interested in them – strengthens motivation.• Look for partner schools who are a good fit for your institution. DePaul ELA partners: • University of Illinois at Springfield • Augustana College • Robert Morris University • Columbia College
  • Rowan University: Jackie McCaffertyRowan University: Jackie McCafferty1. Unique history of the IELP at Rowan University• Founded in 1969 to serve bourgeoning immigrant population of Camden, NJ• Rooted in history of social justice and college access programs of the 1960s (i.e. EOF)• Housed at Camden campus• International student population –5-10% of IELP student population• Multiple community outreach programs
  • Rowan University: Jackie McCaffertyRowan University: Jackie McCafferty2. Expanding International Student Population at Rowan University ELC Solicitation Finding allies Senior admin Provost Mandate from Confusion support for Associate Provost about role of university- Provost, SEM (new) (2008) IELP based IELP Director, Int’l Center (new) (2008) (2009) (2011-2012)
  • Two ways to enter the universityIELP Pathway• IELP I-20 • Admission into university• 5-level Program • University I-20• Non-credit • 2 levels• 25 hours/week • Credit-bearing (9 credits)• 15 week semesters • 15 hours in a.m.• Students who successfully • General ed classes in p.m. complete do not need TOEFL/IELTS • Must successfully complete in order for university admission to continue at university
  • Rowan University: Jackie McCaffertyRowan University: Jackie McCafferty3. Challenges (on-going) • University-wide acceptance • Acceptance within the IELP • Demographic changes • Geographic issues (between campuses) • Programmatic changes4. Where are we now? Where are we going? • International Student Population - 33% of IELP • Pathway Program • International Partnerships • Short-term English language programming • Recruitment – marketing, agents, word-of-mouth • UCIEP Membership / CEA Accreditation • Maintaining historical mission
  • Rowan University: Jackie McCaffertyRowan University: Jackie McCafferty5. Advice • Senior admin buy-in is key • Find allies across the university in key places – one-on- one discussions vs. department/college level meetings • Find a home in an academic department (if possible) • Know where colleagues stand on issue of internationalization • IELP/Pathway – be sure to have clear exit criteria • Align IELP goal with university goal • Be a presence - facilitate workshops, participate in committees • Small steps toward large goal IELP at Rowan University at Camden
  • University of Delaware: Scott StevensUniversity of Delaware: Scott Stevens Impetus to Program• Arrival of new president• Pathway to Prominence• “In our independent world, the University of Delaware must prepare students to be contributing citizens of the world, and serve as a ‘citizen university’ in a global society.”
  • University of Delaware: Scott StevensBeginning from a Position of Strength• ELI well-positioned and well-respected1. Ran UD’s ITA program for 25 years2. Administered graduate TESL Program3. Was a large and growing program with healthy balance sheets• Restructuring of colleges made ELI a great catch for CAS and vice versa, leading to greater mission alignment
  • University of Delaware: Scott StevensProgram Model for CAP• Applied to all undergraduate programs• About 18 graduate programs• Admissions based on academic records—no IBT• Students meet language requirement through ELI
  • University of Delaware: Scott StevensCAP CALP Requirements through ELI• Must complete Level VI EAP1. Grades of B in Listening and Speaking2. Grades of B in Reading, Writing, Grammar3. 6.5 (out of 7) in double blind rating of essay4. Effort grade of 1 or 2
  • University of Delaware: Scott StevensCAP Engagement Requirements1. Must live either with homestay family or in Global Community2. Must participate in Cohort program with engagement scores of 6
  • University of Delaware: Scott StevensCredit and Bridge Options• Can matriculate directly after ELI EAPVI with 3 credits in lieu of Freshman Comp.• Can participate in Bridge Program1. Must have met requirement in either EAPVI LS or EAPVI RW2. Can take 1 math course3. Can choose from among three electives4. Mentor attends elective with student5. Mentor leads recitation class 2x/week
  • University of Delaware: Scott StevensRecruitment• One visit to China during the “Wild East”• Carefully vetting and signing trusted agent• Challenge in attaining diversity
  • University of Delaware: Scott StevensEarly Challenges• Too much of a good thing: 2008 flood• Ramping up infrastructure• Coordinating Services and Support: GRR (Global Recruitment and Retention)• When your IEP triples in size:1. Faculty (hiring, mentoring, supporting)2. Space3. Administrative Staffing4. Policies and Procedures
  • Drexel University : Tobie HoffmanDrexel University: Tobie Hoffman• Philadelphia, PA• Private Urban University• 20,000 Undergraduate and 10,000 Graduate Students• 15% International Students• Housed in the College of Arts and Sciences• IEP – 150 Students
  • Drexel University : Tobie HoffmanDrexel International Gateway• Foundation year of academic and English language study• Minimum of three terms required for successful completion• Up to 17 hours of university credit• 1st year 40 students in program, 32 matriculated• 2nd year 95 students in program, 65 matriculated• 3rd year 75 students in program
  • Drexel University : Tobie HoffmanTip One: Involve Your Campus Resources ADMISSIONS Academic eligibility and testing requirements ACADEMICS Support of Dean and Faculty, creating Academic courses, relationships with faculty STUDENT LIFE OPERATIONS Arranging off campus and on Applications, communications, regis campus housing, extra-curricular tration systems
  • Tip Two:Understand Admission Criteria AY 2010- 2011 AY 2012• TOEFL score 45/ 79 • TOEFL 53/79• IELTS score 4.5/6.5 • IELTS 5.5 (all subscores must be 5.0) / 6.5• GPA must meet • GPA must meet minimum for Drexel minimum for Drexel majors majors• AACRAO transcript • Drexel transcript evaluation training evaluation training
  • Tip Three: American Cultural Connections™. AY 2011 AY 2012• Voluntary activities • Mandatory programs• Visits by Drexel advisors • Community Bridge in spring and summer • Visits by Drexel staff in winter and spring
  • Tip Four: Curriculum Will Evolve 2011-12 2012-13FALL Fulltime English Fulltime English Test Preparation (choice of IELTS Test Preparation (choice or TOEFL) of IELTS or TOEFL) tutoring tutoringWINTER Fulltime English Fulltime English preparation Test preparation Math ( by major) Math based on placement exam)SPRING Chemistry, Math Chemistry, Math Chemistry writing support Chemistry writing Test preparation or Skills for support College Success Skills for College SuccessSUMMER 7 Drexel credits 7 Drexel credits Content Support Content Support Skills for College Success ELC class
  • Tip Five: Staffing Growth AY 2010-2011 AY 2012• Coordinator • Coordinator• Part time advisor • Fulltime advisor• Other administrators • Front office staff dedicated time for application to application processing processing • Experienced instructors for testing and content• Specialized instruction support for testing and content • Student assistant support • Community Bridge coordinator
  • George Mason University George Mason University: Nicole SealeyNicole SealeyUniversity ELI• Public institution located in • 30 years old Fairfax, VA (Founded in 1972) • CEA Accredited• Enrollments upwards of 33,000 • ~200 students being taught at 8• International enrollment levels averaging 6% • 16 faculty plus administrators• Washington, DC Metro area • Operates as an auxiliary• Students enrolled from over 136 enterprise nations • Housed in the division of• 10+ offices actively engaged in University Life (student affairs) internationalization-related efforts
  • George Mason University: Nicole SealeyGeorge Mason UniversityNicole Sealey Options Explored Selected Approach• External: Outsourcing • Internal – New• Internal: Utilizing • Logic: internal resources • Retain high level of• Internal – New: control and work with our students directly Creation of New • Utilize plentiful Structure existing resources without overtaxing them
  • George Mason University George Mason University: Nicole SealeyNicole SealeyACCESS Program• International Freshmen• Alternative Admission Requirements • Meets academic qualifications • Lower English Proficiency threshold (~68 TOEFL, 5.5 IELTS) • Provisional admission to degree status• Goal: One year comprehensive first-year experience • Multi-pronged research informed approach • First-year Experience • International Programs & Outreach • Academic Advising for “At-risk students” • Multicultural Education • Sheltered & Adjunct Model Utilized
  • George Mason University George Mason University: Nicole SealeyNicole SealeyBRIDGE Program• International Graduate Students• Alternative Admission Requirements • Meet academic qualifications • Lower English Proficiency threshold (~80 TOEFL, 6.0 IELTS) OR 3-year BS degree • Provisional admission to degree status• Goal: Introduction to Graduate Study and Professionalization • Multi-pronged research informed approach • International Programs & Outreach • Writing in the Disciplines/Writing Across the Curriculum • English for Academic Purposes • Institutional Credit-bearing course model
  • George Mason University George Mason University: Nicole SealeyNicole Sealey Infrastructure • Established “Center for International Student Access” in Fall 2010; located in Office of Provost • Connected to Institutional Infrastructure • Resource Sharing (ELI Partnership) • “Initiative-based” budget model • Set aside • Some of net revenues were reallocated to support specific internationalization efforts • Self-sustaining
  • George Mason University George Mason University: Nicole SealeyNicole Sealey• Program Needs • Achieving appropriate balance of human resources • Securing needed space/housing requirements • Obtaining uninhibited access to qualified faculty resources • Fully developed enrollment funnel model for recruitment, retention, and graduation through program assessment & environmental analyses• Institutional Prioritization• Consensus Building • Internal buy-in/marketing • Partnering with ELI • Personnel  Qualified faculty  Qualified staff
  • George Mason University George Mason University: Nicole SealeyNicole Sealey Enrollment – Exceeding Expectations Response & Results100 • Positive Stakeholder 90 feedback 80 70  Students 60 Fall  Faculty 50 40 Spring  Staff 30 Sophomore • Increasing institutional 20 support 10 0 • Scholarship 2010 2011 2012 Cohort Cohort Cohort
  • George Mason University George Mason University: Nicole SealeyNicole Sealey Advice • If your ELI is outside the university (e.g., “auxiliary”) decide what it means for the ELI to partner in such an endeavor • Learn to “speak the language” of administrators and university faculty • Incorporate resources/expertise from around the university • Tell your story – clearly and fully • Faculty and Curriculum Development – specialized understanding and informed by expertise • Implications for “Big Picture” thinking about the place of language in institutional goals • Opportunities for Social Justice in HE abound!
  • Q & A: The PanelQuestions and AnswersCarter Winkle, Barry University (Facilitator)Randy Hardwick, DePaul UniversityJacqueline McCafferty, Rowan UniversityScott Stevens, University of DelawareTobie Hoffman, Drexel UniversityNicole Sealey, George Mason University