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The prospects and limitations for wood fibre bioenergy development in Indonesia

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In this presentation, CIFOR scientist Ahmad Dermawan discusses Indonesia’s plan for bioenergy development and the opportunities and challenges inherent in the recent interest in wood pellets from …

In this presentation, CIFOR scientist Ahmad Dermawan discusses Indonesia’s plan for bioenergy development and the opportunities and challenges inherent in the recent interest in wood pellets from South Korea and China. In developing countries, he argues, the challenge is not (only) on technological issues or production of bioenergy, but also on social and governance issues.

Ahmad gave this presentation as part of the ‘Feedstock from wood and forestry and conversion technology’ session at the second Annual World Congress of Bioenergy: Renewable Energy for Sustainability, held in Xi’an, China on 25–28 April 2012.

Published in: Education, Technology, Business

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  • 1. The prospects and challenges for wood fiber bioenergy development in Indonesia Ahmad Dermawan and Krystof Obidzinski BIT’s 2nd Annual World Congress of Bioenergy – 2012 Xi’an, 25-28 April 2012THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 2. Structure About CIFOR Forest resources in Indonesia Wood-based energy in Indonesia Opportunities Challenges Implications THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 3. Center for International Forestry ResearchEstablished in 1993A “center without walls”: 200 staff globally, with extensivenetwork of partnersGlobal mandate, with focus on tropical forestsHeadquartered in Bogor, Indonesia2 Regional Offices, 7 Project offices, 37 country sites THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 4. Energy Mix in Indonesia THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 5. Indonesia is a forest- forest- rich country……but the forest is declining• About 134 million ha forest estate• Only 91 million ha forest cover• Papua is where much forest cover left THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 6. Shift in log sources: from natural forests to timber plantations 40,000,000 30,000,000Log production (m3) 20,000,000 10,000,000 0 1994/95 1995/96 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Natural Forests Land Clearing Timber Plantations Others THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 7. Area (ha) 0 1,000,000 2,000,000 3,000,000 4,000,000 5,000,000 6,000,000 7,000,000 8,000,000 9,000,000 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 Smallholders 1986 1987 SOE 1988 1989 1990 Private 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005THINKING beyond the canopy 2006 2007 Oil palm expansion 2008 2009 2010
  • 8. Increasing demand for pulp and paper 8,000,000 7,000,000 6,000,000 5,000,000Pulp production (m3) 4,000,000 3,000,000 2,000,000 1,000,000 0 1997/1998 1998/1999 1999/2000 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 9. Wood- Wood-based energy in IndonesiaRecent interests in wood pellets due to demand fromabroadNew investments coming in, notably from South KoreaChina is exploring the opportunitiesLand has been allocated for timber plantations for woodpellets: Papua, Kalimantan, Central Java THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 10. Opportunities Potentially large areas available for new plantations • Approximately 13 million ha of land for biofuels Government support, esp. in “food and energy zone” • Lowered or exemption of taxes • Fast tracked land acquisition • Concession rights valid for 60 years, extendable to 90 years • Visas and immigration assistance THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 11. ChallengesDecentralization complicates licensing and dealing onadministration mattersAlthough available land is large, it is generally dispersedLand tenure system is complexDemand for pulp and paper is still high and moreprofitableOil is still heavily subsidized in Indonesia THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 12. ImplicationsSocial issues is as important as technical and economicissues.Getting government buy-in is importantGet the processes for land acquisition and transfer ofland compensation funds sorted out in a clear andtransparent mannerBe prepared for negotiate legally binding acquisitionagreements and employment guarantees with localcommunities THINKING beyond the canopy
  • 13. www.cifor.org THINKING beyond the canopy