The IFRI approach to studying tenure

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The International Forestry Resources and Institutions (IFRI) Research Network is a cooperative of research centres and researchers focused on exploring how people shape the world’s forests. The network is collaborating to collect core data across many countries, and this presentation outlines the approach to collecting this data and gives some examples of questions posed to communities about tenure. This presentation was given during CIFOR’s Annual Meeting 2012, which was held on 1–5 October at the headquarters in Bogor, Indonesia.

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The IFRI approach to studying tenure

  1. 1. The IFRI Approach to Studying Tenure Krister
Andersson University
of
Colorado
at
Boulder,
USAInternational
Forestry
Resources
and
Institutions
(IFRI)
Research
Network 2012
CIFOR
Annual
Meeting Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  2. 2. Take‐home
message• IFRI
approach
is
useful
because – Collects
comparable
data
from
multiple
contexts – Relies
on
overtime
observations – Has
a
nested
data
structure Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  3. 3. What is IFRI?• International
Forestry
Resources
and
Institutions
(IFRI)
Research
Network• A
network
focused
on
local
forest
governance
and
outcomes• Est.
1992
by
Elinor
Ostrom
at
Indiana
U.
with
support
from
FAO• Now
coordinated
by
Arun
Agrawal
at
U
of
Michigan• 12
Collaborating
Research
Centers
(approximately
40
researchers)• 330
researchers
trained
(from
38
countries)• 225
peer‐reviewed
publications
(30K
citations
on
Google
scholar) Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  4. 4. Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  5. 5. IFRI
Shared
Database
–
June
’12 Visits
per
Site Total 1
Visit 150 2
Visits 108 3
Visits 69 4
Visits 4 Total
Sites 331 Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  6. 6. IFRI
Data
Structure Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  7. 7. Field
Research
Approach• In‐depth
qualitative
case studies,
2‐4
weeks/site• CRCs
collect
and
code comparable
field
data• Ecological,
socioeconomic, institutional
variables• Sources
of
data:
direct measurements,
participant observation,
key
informants, focus
groups,
census, cadaster—not
surveys
alone! Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  8. 8. Nested
units
of
analysis• Enables
multilevel
analysis• Exploits
three
types
of variation: – Temporal – Spatial – Inter‐level Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  9. 9. Approach
for
studying
tenure• Property
rights:
“rules affecting
the
flow
and distribution
of
benefits from
resources
to users”• Codes
about
50 variables
related
to property
rights• Team
leader
chooses appropriate

field methods Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  10. 10. Sample variables about tenureAt
product
level:B1.
What
is
the
nature
of
the
groups
current
legal
claim
to
theharvest
or
use
of
this
forest
product?
<RLEGCLAIM> (1)
De
jure
(by
right,
as
established
by
law) (2)
De
facto
(as
exists,
not
necessarily
by
legal
establishment) (3)
De
jure
and
de
facto
(they
have
a
formal
right
and
exercising
it) (4)
Contrary
to
formal
lawD1.
Do
accessing,
harvesting,
processing,
or
selling
rules
existthat
affect
the
harvesting
level
or
use
of
this
product?<RRULEEXIST> Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  11. 11. Tenure
variables
at
Forest
level• F1.
Does
this
user
group
include
the
owner(s) of
the
forest?
<GOWNFOREST>• D2.
If
more
than
one
group
uses
this
forest, are
rules
for
using
this
forest
well
defined between
different
groups?
That
is,
are
there rules
that
specify
the
actions
that
different groups
follow?
<FRULEDEFIN> Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  12. 12. Conclusions• Strengths – Comparable
core
data
across
many
sites – Longitudindal – Nested
units
of
analysis• Weaknesses – Sampling
strategy – Core
data
only—insufficient
in
many
contexts Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…
  13. 13. Further Information about IFRIIFRI website at http://www.umich.edu/~ifri krister.andersson@colorado.edu Exploring
how
people
shape
the
world’s
forests…

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