Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Spatial Modelling Approach to Clustering the Furniture Industry and Regional Development in Jepara, Indonesia
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Spatial Modelling Approach to Clustering the Furniture Industry and Regional Development in Jepara, Indonesia

1,099
views

Published on

About 95% of the furniture industry in Indonesia is managed in small-scale and medium enterprises. These enterprises naturally form clusters, but are not necessarily efficiently distributed in terms …

About 95% of the furniture industry in Indonesia is managed in small-scale and medium enterprises. These enterprises naturally form clusters, but are not necessarily efficiently distributed in terms of obtaining wood material and marketing. This inefficiency can make the industry less competitive. In this presentation, CIFOR researcher Rubeta Andriani provides spatial analysis of small- and medium-sized furniture enterprises in Jepara, Central Java, which contribute 10% to Indonesia’s national furniture export value (US$1.5 billion). The spatial analysis provides options for making more efficient enterprise clusters for regional development. She gave this presentation at the MODSIM International Congress on Model and Simulations held on 12–16 December 2011 in Perth. The conference took the theme ‘Sustaining Our Future: understanding and living with uncertainty’.


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,099
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Spatial Modeling Approach to Clustering theFurniture Industry and Regional Development in Jepara, Indonesia Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand 13 Dec 2011
  • 2. Structure Introduction Method Result  Spatial distribution  Spatial analysis Conclusion
  • 3. Introduction• 95% furniture industry managed by small- scale and medium enterprises (SMEs)• Jepara, Central Java, long history of significant furniture industry player• Provide livelihood for + 5m people (direct/indirect) through 15,271 associated enterprises (2005)
  • 4. Introduction – cont.• Dropped to 11,981 enterprises in 2010 – 96% independent (focus on specific activities, e.g. workshops, sawmills) – 4% integrated (integrate 2 or more activities, e.g. workshop and showroom, log yard and sawmill)• 92% are small scale producers• Furniture industries contributed 27% of Jepara district’s income (2009); accounted for 10% national export value (US$1.5 billion)
  • 5. Introduction – cont.• SMEs in Jepara formed natural clusters – Not efficiently distributed in obtaining raw materials and marketing• Large number of small workshops were established during the export boom era in 1997/98• Many exited soon after the boom; due to inefficiency: – Unable to cope with increasing raw material price – Unable to fulfill market demands• Aim to analyze the spatial context of efficiency based on the industrial location theory – Total reduction in production costs, including minimizing transportation costs
  • 6. Method• Two sets of data were used – Spatial census 11,981 enterprises – Detailed intensive survey 2,000 enterprises• Upstream efficiency – Distance from producers (workshops and warehouses) to suppliers (wood)• Downstream efficiency – Distance from producers (workshops and warehouses) to retailers (showrooms)
  • 7. Method – cont.• The efficiency will affect the industry’s revenue  gross revenue• Efficiency  reduced operation costs and time – Less transportation costs  more efficient
  • 8. Results – spatial distribution
  • 9. Results – spatial distribution CEK
  • 10. Results – spatial distribution
  • 11. Result – spatial analysis Distance Distance Annual to to Wood Road gross Sub-district Furniture Supplier density revenue (in retailers (km) million Rp.) (km) Bangsri 1.46 10.48 0.0038 231,152 Batealit 0.78 0.79 0.0052 1,308,344 Donorojo 15.64 25.22 0.0033 6,788 Jepara 0.75 1.04 0.0043 1,312,824 Kalinyamatan 1.88 3.14 0.0058 23,528 Kedung 0.46 0.62 0.0055 402,600 Keling 10.58 21.24 0.0029 3,372 Kembang 3.16 14.68 0.0039 24,924 Mayong 1.78 4.16 0.0037 27,978 Mlonggo 0.90 7.22 0.0052 572,754 Nalumsari 8.11 10.92 0.0039 8,374 Pakisaji 1.02 3.24 0.0043 321,344 Pecangaan 0.76 1.22 0.0057 467,858 Tahunan 0.29 0.17 0.0066 3,306,500 Welahan 4.16 6.19 0.0059 7,380
  • 12. Result – spatial analysis35302520 Distance to Wood Suppliers (km)15 Distance to Furniture10 retailers (km) Annual gross revenue 5 0 Pakisaji Welahan BATEALIT Keling Kalinyamatan Nalumsari Pecangaan TAHUNAN Mayong Donorojo Kembang JEPARA Kedung Bangsri Mlonggo
  • 13. Result – spatial analysis
  • 14. ConclusionFurniture industry in Jepara has:• Different downstream and upstream efficiency• significance correlation • furniture workshop  retailers • furniture workshop  suppliers• Furniture industry in Jepara is more buyer driven• Future development of Jepara needs to consider: • Spatial configuration of furniture retailers and wood suppliers • Road network
  • 15. THANK YOU