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Political Economy of REDD+ in PeruMary Menton, Hugo Che Piu, Javier Perla,  Daniela FreundtCIFOR, DAR, Libelula
Brief process overview in Peru: key REDD+ policy events                                                                   ...
Media
Discourse                 (Perla
et
al
in
press)Overlap
=
9
articles             Climate             Change REDD    ...
Drivers & Powerful Players   Annual
Deforestation
Rate
=
0.2%   150,000
ha

[DFM1]Perhaps
the
scientific
name
could
be
added
next
to
the
common
name?                     Economics of Key Sectors   ...
Area under cultivationProduct                   Area,
National               Area,
Lower
Amazon
States                    ...
Coca and CocaineRegion          Hectares                CultivatedCusco                   19391Huánuco                 127...
Gold Mining – Madre de Dios<title>                                            Photo:
SPDA,
                               ...
Oil Palm ~20,000 ha(Guitierrez et al 2011)

[DFM1]Perhaps
the
scientific
name
could
be
added
next
to
the
common
name?                     Economics of Key Sectors   ...
Proposed
Institutional
Arrangements
for
REDD     Propuesta
A rreglos
Institucionales                          PCM         ...
REDD
Dreams
vs
REDD
RealityDreams                           Reality• Multi‐sectorial

cooperation   • Lack
of
cooperation
...
AcknowledgementsThe
here
presented
data
and
analysis
is
part
of
the
policy
component
of
CIFOR’s
global   comparative
study...
Political economy of REDD+ in Peru
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Political economy of REDD+ in Peru

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This presentation gives an overview of the political and economic context of the REDD+ process in Peru. Money flowing to/from REDD and the forestry sector represents a small fraction of that dedicated to key drivers of deforestation. Up against bigger players like mining and agriculture, there are some challenges inherent in making the REDD+ dreams match up with reality.

CIFOR scientist Mary Menton gave this presentation on 18 June 2012 at a panel discussion organised by CIFOR and partners at the ISEE 2012 Conference at Rio, which convened under the topic "Ecological Economics and Rio+20: Challenges and Contributions for a Green Economy". The panel was titled ‘National strategies for reducing emissions from avoided deforestation and degradation – how much transformational change is possible in current political and economic realities? Part I – An overview’. For more information, visit http://www.cifor.org/events/rio20/

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Transcript of "Political economy of REDD+ in Peru"

  1. 1. Political Economy of REDD+ in PeruMary Menton, Hugo Che Piu, Javier Perla, Daniela FreundtCIFOR, DAR, Libelula
  2. 2. Brief process overview in Peru: key REDD+ policy events January FIP Exploratory MissionAprilNested March MarchApproach FIP Pilot R-PP May Country Approved Creation of the REDD Technical April April May March Group within the R-PP Declaration of Grupo CNCC (National submitted National REDD Council on Climate Iquitos and Safeguards Change Formation of Workshop Mesa-Indigena 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 June July R-PIN sent PNCB June December to FCPF National Peru Net Zero Forest joins UN- December Deforestation Conservation conserve 54 by 2021 REDD Program million ha of forest
  3. 3. Media
Discourse (Perla
et
al
in
press)Overlap
=
9
articles Climate Change REDD & 33 Forests 203
  4. 4. Drivers & Powerful Players Annual
Deforestation
Rate
=
0.2% 150,000
ha
  5. 5. 
[DFM1]Perhaps
the
scientific
name
could
be
added
next
to
the
common
name? Economics of Key Sectors Based on 2010 National Statistics (INEI, UNODP) Product Export %GDP Mining $21.72
billion 5.7% Gold 58,000,000
ha $7.76
billion 2% Petroleum
&
Gas $3.1
billion 0.8% Agriculture
and $7.6
billion 7.5% 3,113,000
ha Livestock Cocaine $10.7
billion n/a Forestry
Sector
=
1%
of
GDP 61,200
ha
  6. 6. Area under cultivationProduct Area,
National Area,
Lower
Amazon
States (hectares) 
(MDD,
Loreto,
Ucayali,
SM)Rice 388,532 85,403Coffee 349,354 73,445Banana 156,114 78,934Maiz 542,657 62,621Cassava 105,063 54,181Cacau 77,147 36,800Coca
(legal
&
illegal) 61,200 6,558Palm
oil 19,055 19,055Cattle ?? 191,000 Source:
INEI,
Cattle
based
on
calculations
based
on
INEI
and
FAO
stats
  7. 7. Coca and CocaineRegion Hectares CultivatedCusco 19391Huánuco 12759Ayacucho 10800Puno 4305Ucayali 2803Junín 3835Loreto 2015Pasco 1729San
Martín 1725La
Libertad 1061Amazonas 429Cajamarca 372Madre
de
Dios 15 Source:
UNODC
2011 www.unodc.org/unodc/en/crop_monitoring/index.html
  8. 8. Gold Mining – Madre de Dios<title> Photo:
SPDA,
 Actualidad
Ambiental List
1 List
2 List
3 Source:
Swensen
et
al
2011
  9. 9. Oil Palm ~20,000 ha(Guitierrez et al 2011)
  10. 10. 
[DFM1]Perhaps
the
scientific
name
could
be
added
next
to
the
common
name? Economics of Key Sectors Based on 2010 National Statistics (INEI, UNODP) Product Export %GDP Mining $21.72
billion 5.7% Gold $7.76
billion 2% Petroleum
&
Gas $3.1
billion 0.8% Agriculture
and S/.
20.2
billion 7.5% Livestock Cocaine $10.7
billion n/a Forestry
Sector
=
1%
of
GDP REDD
funding
to
Peru
govt
=
~$127
million+

  11. 11. Proposed
Institutional
Arrangements
for
REDD Propuesta
A rreglos
Institucionales PCM Coordinación
REDD+ Comité Director Donantes de REDD+ MINAM (Presidente) Moore KfW FCPF FIP MINAG, MEF, MINEM, MINRE Mesas REDD Gobiernos Regionales Rep. Gobiernos Regionales Rep. Donantes (voz sin voto) Dir. Ejecutivo (voz sin voto) Mesa REDD GTREDD (voz sin voto) FONAM PROFONANP E Otros Comité Asesor Indígena (Grupo Técnico REDD) Gestores de fondos de REDD+ Director OCBR Ejecutivo Administración Aspectos socio - Diseminación y Desarrollo Registro Comunicación Institucional económica y MRV SESA Nacional Source:
MINAM
R‐PP
  12. 12. REDD
Dreams
vs
REDD
RealityDreams Reality• Multi‐sectorial

cooperation • Lack
of
cooperation
between and
involvement sector
&
conflicting• Coordinated
national
to initiatives sub‐national • Sub‐national
projects
taking implementation off
with
little
government• Equity
through
participation involvement of
indigenous
groups

and • Examples
of
unfair
deals
and civil
society lack
of
true
FPIC
and• Evidence‐based
decision consultation making • Lack
of
consistent, quantitative
information
of high
quality
  13. 13. AcknowledgementsThe
here
presented
data
and
analysis
is
part
of
the
policy
component
of
CIFOR’s
global comparative
study
on
REDD
(GCS)
http://www.forestsclimatechange.org/global‐ comparative‐study‐on‐redd.html,
led
by
Maria
Brockhaus.The
methods
and
guidelines
used
in
this
research
component
were
designed
by
Maria Brockhaus,
Monica
Di
Gregorio
and
Sheila
Wertz‐Kanounnikoff.
Parts
of
the methodology
are
adapted
from
the
research
protocol
for
media
and
network analysis
designed
by
COMPON
(‘Comparing
Climate
Change
Policy
Networks’).In
addition
to
those
who
helped
with
methods,
we
acknowledge
contributors
to
this study
from
DAR
(Javier
Martinez,
Tania
Garcia)
and
Libelula
(Eduardo
Burga,
Talia Postigo)
as
well
as
those
who
participated
in
interviewWe
gratefully
acknowledge
the
support
received
from
the
Norwegian
Agency
for Development
Cooperation,
the
Australian
Agency
for
International
Development, the
UK
Department
for
International
Development,
the
European
Commission,
the Ministry
for
Foreign
Affairs
of
Finland,
the
David
and
Lucile
Packard
Foundation, the
Program
on
Forests,
and
the
US
Agency
for
International
Development.
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