Myths and realities about men,          women and forest use:        A global comparative study           Terry Sunderland...
Introduction      Many of the claims often         made in the literature on         gender and forest products         a...
Is the harvesting of forest products mainly          undertaken by women?Share of income from unprocessed forest products ...
Is the harvesting of forest products   mainly undertaken by women?                    Our data do not support            ...
Do women collect primarily forsubsistence and men for sale?                     THINKING beyond the canopy
Do women collect for primarily for subsistence and men for sale?                • Both women and men                    co...
Do women collect a greater share of forestproducts from lands under common property         tenure regimes than men?      ...
Do women collect a greater share of forest   products from lands under common   property tenure regimes than men? The vas...
Summary of PEN gender findings There is large regional variation in both the shares of    forest products collected by wo...
Conclusions/Reflections Deeper understanding of gendered patterns of income    generation are important for designing pol...
Look out for…    Special Issue of World       Development including all of the       PEN-related research findings      ...
http://www.cifor.org                       THINKING beyond the canopy
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Myths and realities about men, women and forest use

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There are several commonly held views on how men and women use forests – these views are often based on case studies. But examining global data gathered during the Poverty Environment Network project has come up with some different interpretations, as shown in this presentation. This presentation was given during CIFOR’s Annual Meeting 2012, which was held on 1–5 October at the headquarters in Bogor, Indonesia.

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Myths and realities about men, women and forest use

  1. 1. Myths and realities about men, women and forest use: A global comparative study Terry Sunderland, Ramadhani Achdiawan, Arild Angelsen, Ronnie Babigumira, Amy Ickowitz, Fiona Paumgarten, Victoria Reyes-García, Gerald Shively CIFOR Annual General Meeting 3rd October 2012THINKING beyond the canopy
  2. 2. Introduction  Many of the claims often made in the literature on gender and forest products are based on case studies  However, it is unclear how generalizable they actually are  We investigated whether several commonly held views on gender and forest use are supported by the global PEN data using descriptive and regression analysis THINKING beyond the canopy
  3. 3. Is the harvesting of forest products mainly undertaken by women?Share of income from unprocessed forest products by region and gender THINKING beyond the canopy
  4. 4. Is the harvesting of forest products mainly undertaken by women?  Our data do not support this claim  For unprocessed products, this claim only holds in Sub-Saharan Africa  For processed products, it does not hold in any geographical location THINKING beyond the canopy
  5. 5. Do women collect primarily forsubsistence and men for sale? THINKING beyond the canopy
  6. 6. Do women collect for primarily for subsistence and men for sale? • Both women and men collect predominantly for subsistence use, but … • Men´s sale share is higher than women´s • However, in Sub- Saharan Africa, the share is almost equal THINKING beyond the canopy
  7. 7. Do women collect a greater share of forestproducts from lands under common property tenure regimes than men? THINKING beyond the canopy
  8. 8. Do women collect a greater share of forest products from lands under common property tenure regimes than men? The vast majority of products for both genders is collected under state property tenure regimes In the global sample, the proportion collected by men and women from common property is about the same The conventional claim holds for Latin America and Asia, but not for Africa THINKING beyond the canopy
  9. 9. Summary of PEN gender findings There is large regional variation in both the shares of forest products collected by women Even after controlling for most of the factors discussed in the literature as well as differences in level of market integration, women in Africa collect a much larger share of forest products than women in Asia and Latin America Many of the claims that originate from the gender and forest literature do not hold using the PEN global data sample Men play a much more important and diverse role in the contribution of forest products to rural livelihoods than is often reported THINKING beyond the canopy
  10. 10. Conclusions/Reflections Deeper understanding of gendered patterns of income generation are important for designing policies aimed at improving household welfare in general, but especially those aimed at improving the livelihoods of women Culture is important! Interesting methodological issue: what we can learn from case studies vs. global data This kind of study helps us to see overall patterns, but.. To understand the stories behind the patterns, case studies can be useful, but not as stand-alone reference points THINKING beyond the canopy
  11. 11. Look out for…  Special Issue of World Development including all of the PEN-related research findings  PEN website:http://www.cifor.org/pen/ THINKING beyond the canopy
  12. 12. http://www.cifor.org THINKING beyond the canopy

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