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Making Timber Plantation as an Attractive Business to Smallholders
 

Making Timber Plantation as an Attractive Business to Smallholders

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This presentation by Dede Rohadi, FORDA Scientist, given during the Forests Asia Summit during the discussion forum "Equitable development: Improving livelihood benefits for smallholders in the ...

This presentation by Dede Rohadi, FORDA Scientist, given during the Forests Asia Summit during the discussion forum "Equitable development: Improving livelihood benefits for smallholders in the forestry value chain" focuses on the potential development of smallholder timber plantations, the challenges on improving the performance of smallholder timber plantations, lessons learnt from some research activities on smallholder timber plantations and other important insights.

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    Making Timber Plantation as an Attractive Business to Smallholders Making Timber Plantation as an Attractive Business to Smallholders Presentation Transcript

    • Making Timber Plantation as an Attractive Business to Smallholders Dede Rohadi FORDA’s Seconded Scientist to CIFOR
    • Potential development of smallholder timber plantations: • Demand on timber • Supports from governments and development agencies • Human factors: cultures, experiences Challenges on improving the performance of smallholder timber plantations: • Limited market information/access • Not convinced to apply best practices in timber plantation management. • Weak bargaining power on timber marketing
    • Lessons learnt from some research activities on smallholder timber plantations:  ACIAR funded project on Smallholder Teak Plantation in Gunungkidul (2007-2012)  ACIAR funded project on Community Based Commercial Forestry (2011-2014)  Others (Case study in Lampung/ITTO; Case studies in Tanah Laut South Kalimantan/BMZ)
    • KEY MESSAGES
    • Timber sales share about 15% of the total household income in Gunungkidul, Indonesia.
    • Farmers allocate around 10% of their private land for woodlots (kitren), and also plant timber on other land use types (tegalan and home garden)
    • Farmer’s practices in timber plantations business:  Selling timber individually.  Tebang butuh.  Produce low quality of timbers (small diameter logs, knots, defects).  Women involved in the financial aspects of timber production and harvesting.  Constraints by harvest permits and timber trade regulations.
    • No. Timber species Grade Diameter (cm) Price (Rp 1,000/m3) 1 Teak (Tectona grandis) – Slow growth A1 (DL) A1 (UP) A2 (UD) A3 (UGD) A4 A5 < 13 16-19 22-28  30  44  54 500 – 700 1,000 – 1,400 2,000 – 2,400 3,000 – 3,500 > 4,000 > 5,000 2 Sengon (Paraserianthes falcataria) – Fast growth Length 1.3 m: 10-14 15-19  20  25 395 – 470 495 – 570 695 – 720 795 – 875 Length 2.6 m: 25-29 30-29 40-49  50 800 – 916 925 – 1,100 1,125 – 1,140 1,125 – 1,150 Timber price significantly differs according to their qualities
    • Marketing chain varies significantly across sites/locations. Timber growers in Java has much more options to sell their timber along the marketing chains.
    • Options for improving profits: • Improve farmer’s market orientation • Strengthen collective marketing • Eliminate regulations barriers