• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Importance, Key Questions on Resilience and Managing Disasters in the Hindu Kush Himalayas
 

Importance, Key Questions on Resilience and Managing Disasters in the Hindu Kush Himalayas

on

  • 1,325 views

This presentation by ICIMOD focuses on the role of the Hindu Kush Himalayas in terms of irrigation, what the drivers of change and impacts on resources and people are, what the future water ...

This presentation by ICIMOD focuses on the role of the Hindu Kush Himalayas in terms of irrigation, what the drivers of change and impacts on resources and people are, what the future water availability might be in that area and how we can sustain the mountain ecosystems.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,325
Views on SlideShare
777
Embed Views
548

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

4 Embeds 548

http://unjobs.org 399
http://www.landscapes.org 144
https://twitter.com 3
http://localhost 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Importance, Key Questions on Resilience and Managing Disasters in the Hindu Kush Himalayas Importance, Key Questions on Resilience and Managing Disasters in the Hindu Kush Himalayas Presentation Transcript

    • Importance, Key Questions on Resilience and Managing Disasters in the Hindu Kush Himalayas International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development Kathmandu, Nepal
    • Supports extensive irrigation systems International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development Kathmandu, Nepal
    • HKH is the source of ten major river basins 210 million people in the HKH 1.3 billion people downstream 3 billion people benefit from food and energy
    • Basins support some of the most populated areas on the globe
    • Home to 4 of the 34 Global Biodiversity Hotspots, 60 Eco-regions, 488 Pas, and 330 Important Bird Areas
    • Major Questions on the HKH Region that needs to be addressed looking into the Future International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development Kathmandu, Nepal
    • Drivers of change and impacts on resources and people Increased scarcity of drinking water Natural springs and water sources drying up Loss of productive lands Habitat loss for wildlife and productive lands for domestic animals Increased incidence of forest fires
    • Climate change impacts on cryosphere and future water availability
    • Sustaining mountain ecosystems and their services - green economy
    • Energy needs, hydropower and sustainable development of the HKH Huge Hydropower Potential >500,000 MW in the HKH Region
    • Water induced disasters Flood Landslide/Avalanche Famine Water rel. Epidemic Drought Flash floods result in higher mortality rates Jonkman, 2005
    • Poverty, vulnerability and food security
    • Gender in sustainable mountain development including out-migration Migration
    • The Himalayas are prone to disasters International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development Kathmandu, Nepal
    • Cumulative disaster event Disaster statistics from 1990-2012 Hindu Kush Himalayan region The region has had an average of 76 disaster events each year. On average, more than 36,000 people are killed and 178 million affected each year due to natural disasters in the region. Source: EM-DAT – The OFDA/CRED International Disaster Database
    • Water-related hazards Flood Landslide/Avalanche Famine Water rel. Epidemic Drought Flash floods result in higher mortality rates Jonkman, 2005
    • Transboundary floods have greater impact on lives and property Globally, 10% of all floods are transboundary, and they cause over 30% of all flood casualties and account for close to 60% of all those displaced by floods. Bakker, 2006
    • Lack of information, little preparation  9 April 2000: Landslide blocked the Yigong River, a tributary of the Yarlung Zangbo (Brahmaputra) River  Outburst on 10 June 2000 created a huge flash flood of up to 1.26x105 m3/s  Extensive damage, but no casualties in China  In India, heavy causalities - 30 dead - >100 missing - >50,000 homeless - damage of USD 22.9 million
    • Data sharing can save lives and property 1 month after landslide 2.5 months after landslide After landslide dam outburst  Data sharing agreement developed between India and China in 2002  22 June 2004: Landslide blocked the Pareechu River in Tibet (upper reaches of Sutlej River)  Lake volume - 79,180,000 m3  Chinese authorities communicated to their Indian counterparts well before and when the breach occurred  56 villages along the Sutlej from Kinnaur to Bilaspur were identified as at risk  The dam burst on 25 June 2005  The direct cost of flood damage was an estimated USD 200 million  There were no human casualties because of prior communication from the upstream country
    • Lessons learned from disasters  Data gaps  End-to-end information systems  Proper infrastructure planning  Overarching need for transboundary cooperation
    • Data gaps Monitoring station distribution • High-altitude monitoring stations are sparse • Limited transboundary data sharing
    • Designing end-to-end flood information system
    • Regional cooperation to share data: Global WHYCOS framework To improve basic observation activities, strengthen international cooperation, and promote free exchange of data in the field of hydrometeorology
    • HKH-HYCOS: Setting up monitoring stations and establishment of real-time flood information systems ‘Making Information Travel Faster Than Flood Waters’ Establishment of a Regional Flood Information System in the HKH-Region - Timely exchange of flood data and information through an accessible and user friendly platform HYCOS is a vehicle for technology transfer, training, and capacity building
    • High-tech, low-cost early flood warning system in Bangladesh using a wireless sensor network
    • Low-tech, low cost, community-based flood early warning system in Assam Flood Early Warning System “AL6M” Flood Gauge Control Unit Manufactured by Rain Gauge Sustainable Eco Engineering Pvt. Ltd Patan, Lalitpur -16, Nepal
    • ICIMOD’s state-of-the-art MODIS receiving facility helps provide timely data for various applications, including early flood and fire detection MODIS receiving facility MODIS images are used for national and regional level mapping including rapid response mapping after a flood event. Visit http://geoportal.icimod.org/realtime/modis.aspx# to visualize MODIS image.
    • Conclusion • Need for end-to-end information systems – Hi-tech to low-tech – Science to government to community • Infrastructure planning – Identify risks and vulnerabilities • Mountain specific planning • Transboundary information sharing – Sharing mechanisms • Underpinned by regional cooperation
    • Thank you