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Gender and bushmeat value chain
 

Gender and bushmeat value chain

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Men and women both contribute to and influence the use and trade of bushmeat, all along the bushmeat market chain from hunting to consumption, passing through trade and food preparation. In this ...

Men and women both contribute to and influence the use and trade of bushmeat, all along the bushmeat market chain from hunting to consumption, passing through trade and food preparation. In this presentation, we follow the bushmeat market chain, step by step, examining gendered involvement, and find tips for being gender-sensitive when mapping value chains. This presentation was given during CIFOR’s Annual Meeting 2012, which was held on 1–5 October at the headquarters in Bogor, Indonesia.

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    Gender and bushmeat value chain Gender and bushmeat value chain Presentation Transcript

    • Gender and Bushmeat Value ChainRobert
NasiNathalie
Van
Vliet CIFOR,
Annual
Meeting
2012,

October
3rd
    • ObjectiveTo
understand
the
roles
andcontributions
of
men
andwomen
in
the
use
and
trade
ofbushmeat,
along
the
bushmeattrade
chain
from
hunting
toconsumption,
passing
throughtrade
and
food
preparation
    • The Bushmeat Market Chain Prey Hunters TransportersFinal
consumers
in
rural
areas Wholesalers RetailersFinal
consumers
in
urban
areas
    • Hunting Is
generally
a
”man” only
activity
but....
    • Hunting Women
often
push
for
hunting “If
a
certain
man
goes
hunting
but
I don’t
go,
my
wife
might
even
start
loving that
man.” (Man,
age
32)Tanzania, FZS: Asanterabi Lowassa(asante.kweka@gmail.com)
    • LA
FILIÈRE
VIANDE
DE
BROUSSE The Bushmeat Market Chain Prey Hunters TransportersFinal
consumers
in
rural
areas Retailers WholesalersFinal
consumers
in
urban
areas
    • TransportingMen
are
mostly
involved
in
transport
from
the
source
to
urban
areas
    • LA
FILIÈRE
VIANDE
DE
BROUSSE The Bushmeat Market Chain Prey Hunters Transporters Retailers WholesalersFinal
consumers
in
rural
areasFinal
consumers
in
urban
areas
    • Wholesalers and retailersWomen
are
involved
in
the
trade
from
retailers,
wholesalers,
restaurants, prepared
bushmeat
meals
sold
in
markets
or
in
the
street
    • LA
FILIÈRE
VIANDE
DE
BROUSSE The Bushmeat Market Chain Prey Hunters Transporters Retailers WholesalersFinal
consumers
in
rural
areasFinal
consumers
in
urban
areas
    • Consumption Bushmeat
preferences
by
gender South
west
Cameroun,
van
Vliet
and
Nasi,
unpublished)
 (N=345) women preferences men preferences monkey cane rat monkey 10% 5% 6% cane rat 11% pangolin pangolin 6% 11% red duikers 5% blue duiker red duikers 3% 9% porcupine blue duiker porcupine 61% 2% 46%Bats,
nile
monitor,
fox
and
gorilla
were
only
mentioned

by
men;
elephants
were
clearlypreferred
by
women
(78%
of
the
votes
were
from
women)
    • ConsumptionConsumption
taboos
for
men
and
women Women
that
eat
bay
duiker
could
have
periods
for
ever (Kota,
Gabon)
    • Gender differences• Gender
balance
all
along
the
trade
chain
(Brown, 2003)• Gender
differences
in
the
contribution
of
bushmeat to
income• Gender
differences
in
bushmeat
consumption patterns• Gender
differences
in
exposure
to
zoonosis associated
with
the
handling
of
bushmeat
    • Using
qualitative
data
from
two
sites,
lower
Omo
in
Ethiopia
and
westernSerengeti
in
Tanzania,
we
found
that
in
both
places
women,
while
notactively
hunting,
played
a
strong
role
through
a
variety
ofverbal
and
non‐verbal
behaviours
that
motivated
malehunting
and
discouraged
their
non‐hunting.
Huntingactivities
were
highly
gendered
and
driven
by
the
interplaybetween
male
and
female
roles,
which
served
to
maintainthese
activities
despite
strong
disincentives
from
legislationand
conservation
and
development
interventions.
    • Methodological implications• Study
of
the
value
chain without
considering gender
is
largely irrelevant• There
is
no
need
of
very sophisticated
methods• Common
sense
should prevail
    • Methods.
Cameroon• Bushmeat
consumption
surveys
at
the
household
level •
Socio‐economic
characteristics
of
the
household •Proteins
consumed
the
day
before
the
interview for
breakfast,
lunch
and
dinner •Stated
preference
for
different
sources
of protein
    • Methods• Bushmeat
consumption
interviews
to
school
pupils
in indigenous
communities,
small
towns
and
cities •
Socio‐economic
characteristics
of
the
families •Proteins
consumed
the
day
before
the
interview for
breakfast,
lunch
and
dinner •Stated
preference
for
different
sources
of protein
    • Methods• Identification
of
the
market
chain: stakeholders
involved,
trade
points,
prices, trade
routes
etc…•Visit
trade
points•Participant
observation•Informal
and
non
systematic
conversations
withtraders
and
consumers•Daily
monitoring
of
sales
in
specific
key
pointsfor
one
month
during
the
dry
season
    • Practical Tips for Gender- Sensitive Value Chain MappingEngage
in
preliminary
mapping
of
the
chain,
considering
gender, by
using
secondary
sources
and
project’s
documentation before
starting
the
study.Add
a
gender
dimension
to
a
standard
mapping
of
a
value
chain is
marginally
costly.
Critical
steps
are:  
to
enquire
about
the
relative
proportions
of
women
and men
at
each
node
and  to
ask
about
who
makes
the
transactions
between
nodes.  complemented
by
further
investigation
into
wage differentials
between
women
and
men
at
each
node,
and between
nodes.
    • It
is
important
to
go
out
into
the
field
and
to
seek
access
to stakeholders
as
opposed
to
relying
on
spokespersons
for organisations
who
may
proffer
large
claims
regarding progress
towards
gender
equity.
A
richer,
more
nuanced picture
can
be
gained
through
talking
to
a
range
of
actors
at each
node
in
the
chain.People
like
‘successful
case
stories’.
Yet
these
may
not
typify
the average
stories
resulting
from
the
work
and
the
lessons
that can
be
developed
from
these.
It
is
therefore
useful
to consider
carefully
the
kinds
of
respondent
that
the
scientist would
like
to
speak
to
and
the
nature
of
the
interaction sought
‐
e.g.
with
or
without
project
representatives, representatives
of
various
stakeholders,
and
the
need
to meet
‘average
cases’.Gender‐sensitive
translators
comfortable
with
working
in
the field
are
essential
and
so
are
gender‐sensitive
investigators.
    • Thank you