Food sovereignty for food security: how protecting traditional knowledge and agro-biodiversity can be part of the solution
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Food sovereignty for food security: how protecting traditional knowledge and agro-biodiversity can be part of the solution

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This presentation was given on 8 September 2012 at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Jeju, South Korea, during a session co-hosted by CIFOR titled ‘Managing wild species and systems for food ...

This presentation was given on 8 September 2012 at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Jeju, South Korea, during a session co-hosted by CIFOR titled ‘Managing wild species and systems for food security’.

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Food sovereignty for food security: how protecting traditional knowledge and agro-biodiversity can be part of the solution Food sovereignty for food security: how protecting traditional knowledge and agro-biodiversity can be part of the solution Presentation Transcript

  • Food
Sovereignty
for
Food
SecurityHow
protecting
traditional
knowledge
and
agro‐biodiversity
can
be
part
of
the solution Workshop
“Managing
wild
species
and
systems
for
food
security” Co‐organized
by
Bioversity
International
and
CIFOR IUCN
World
Conservation
Congress Jeju
(Korea),
6‐15
September
2012 Cristina
Eghenter Deputy
Director
for
Social
Development WWF‐Indonesia
  • • The
physical
limits
of
agriculture
(land,
productivity, intensification,
etc)?• Low
investment
and
innovation• The
supply
vs
demand
argument:
Food
scarcity?• Whose
demand
for
food?• The
distributional
and
equity
dimensions
of
food
security
  • Ecosystem
and
biodiversity
conservation
&
food
security: The
Risks•More
land
clearing•Loss
of
biodiversity
can
also
mean
loss
of
food
and
cultural/spiritualsystem•Loss
of
traditional
knowledge
and
practices
associated
with
smallagroforestry
and
agricultural
regimes•Increased
disempowerment
and
creation
of
poverty
  • Food
security
is
not
only
a
matter
of
quantity
of
food,
but
also
ofthe
diversity
and
quality
of
food,
and
related
cultivars,
equally
atthe
basis
of
a
sustainable
and
meaningful
food&livelihood
systemIt
is
the
local
enrichment

and
active
experiments
and
practices
oflocal
&
Indigenous
people
(men
and
women)
that
have
oftenshaped
the
variety
of
cultivars
and
diversity
of
food
plants
of
ourplanetFood
sovereignity
as
a
way
to
recognize
rights
and
diversity,
andestablish
fair
protection
claims
over
the
genetic
resources
thatmake
up
agro‐biodiversity
  • • High
biodiversity
is
a
salient
feature
of
traditional
farming
systems• ‘Local’
feature
of
traditional
farming
systems:
agrobiodiversity nurtured
in
very
specific
environments
and
micro‐climates,
influenced by
cultural
traditions
and
strong
preferences• The
results
of
surveys
conducted
by
local
people
in
the
Highlands
of Krayan,
Kecamatan
Krayan
Selatan,
Kabupaten
Nunukan
(2005):
over (20)
local
varieties
of
durian
“datu”
fruit
or
varieties
with
enough phenotypical
and
sensorial
distinct
characteristics
to
warrant
a different
name
in
the
local
language• Over
(40)
varieties
of
rice
are
planted
in
any
planting
season
between the
Bahau
and
Pujungan
sub‐districts
in
Malinau.
In
Krayan
Selatan, (22)
varieties
of
paddy
rice
were
cultivated
in
the
six
settlements

of
the sub‐district
of
Krayan
Selatan
in
2007
and
(4)
hill
rice
varieties.• A
study
of
two
communities
in
Sarawak
(Christiansen
2002)
found
that local
people
have
knowledge
of
over
1,144
species,
representing
more than
172
botanical
families.
Around
20%
of
the
species
known
and
used are
cultivated,
semi‐managed
or
domesticated.
Around
50%
of
these species
have
multiple
uses.
The
most
important
of
these
uses
is
food.
  • • The
‘diversity’
and
‘locality’
of
cultivars
and
genetic
resources
is
a way
to
build
resilience,
adaptability
and
reduce
vulnerability
by maintaining

diverse
and
adaptive
plants
that
can
cope
with climate
and
environmental
crises.• The
varieties
also
need
to
be
recognized,
and
origin





and
names
maintained,
as
part
of
a
fair
food





sovereignty
program.
  • • Is
conservation
and
sovereignty
of
agro‐biodiversity
and local
cultivars
the
solution
to
food
security?
Not
by
itself, but
it
is
an
important
dimension
to
consider
and
integrate in
policies
to
ensure
long‐term
security
and
sustainability
in conservation
landscapes.• Food
security
will
also
require
technological
and
financial investment
in
sustainable
farming
practices,
more innovation,
tenure
security,
and
overall
good
governance of
the
land
and
other
natural
resources.• Some
important
policies
will
also
need
to
be
followed
up and
implemented:

Access
and
Benefit
Sharing
(ABS) protocol

(and
Community
Protocols
to
protect
customary practices
and
knowledge);
thw
institution
of
the
office
for food
security
of
the
Ministry
of
Agriculture
which
has
an explict
mandate
to
identify
and
develop
local
food plants/crops
integrated
and
in
line
with
traditional knowledge
as
a
basis
for
diversification
of
staple
food.
  • WWF
Indonesia
plans
to
engage
in
more
:field
action
and
advocacy
insupport
of
agro‐biodiversity
and
recognition
of
related
traditionalknowledge•Focus
on
small
farms
are
as
a
significant
share
of
agricultural
production•Promote
environment‐friendly
methods
and
investment•Documentation
and
protection
of

bio‐cultural
knowledge
systems
relatedto
plants
and
crops
(community
potocols;
registry
and
banks
of
traditionalseeds)•Management
of
competing
claims
over
land
use
to
avoid
land
grabbing
forbiofuels
and
cattle
feed•Promote
good
governance
of
natural
capital
by
involving
the
relevantstakeholders
and
right‐holders,
and
based
on
meaningful
collaboration
andfair
partnerships•In
landscapes
and
regions
where
traditional
management
practices,customary
land
use,
local
wisdom
and
rich
biodiversity
are
linked
in
strongand
adaptive
systems,
these
need
to
be
maintained
so
that
they
can
serve
asa
basis
for
sustainable
and
resilient
green
economies.
  • Thank
YouPhotos
©:
Darius,
Frans,
Robertson,
WWF
Indonesia