Engaging Society in the Design of   Conservation Programmes    Intu Boedhihartono and Jeff Sayer          James Cook Unive...
We have tried to engage “society”•Civil society in rich countries•The people who live in tropical forests•Decision makers?...
Steven Landsburg“People respond to incentives – all the rest is commentary”
• “Engagement”  – Engaging = Negotiating  – Delivering incentives  – PES, REDD, ICDPs
IIED review of 38 PES projects – all failed after 2-3 years
• Indonesia REDD – $1 billion - $30 million to  UNDP for planning - $7 million spent on  “Reddiness”!
16 Projects in the Mekong•Maintained status quo•Little real benefit to people•Continuing loss of biodiversity
ICDPs• Congo Basin  • $ millions invested  • People still poor  • Biodiversity still declining
Conservation and Development Indicators
• Development comes with investment• Richer people:  – Use land more efficiently  – Move to cities  – Value their time
So which “society” to “engage”• The people whose decisions are important   • The politicians who make decisions   • The ac...
Threats or outcomes• “Threat based conservation” – good for fund  raising, the media etc• But maybe “Results based conserv...
Place-based conservation• 1983 – WWF/IUCN – field projects• 2011 – Political declarations – media -  conferences - money• ...
Thank you
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Engaging society in the design of conservation programmes

664 views
607 views

Published on

Millions of dollars have been invested in conservation projects with little to show for it: people are still poor; biodiversity is still declining. In this presentation CIFOR¹s founding Director General, Jeff Sayer, contends that incentives are the key to engaging society in conservation, and therefore efforts would have better outcomes if we move from threat-based conservation (primarily good for fundraising and media) to results-based conservation (engaging industry and negotiating incentives and outcomes). He gave this presentation on 6 December 2011 at the 25th international congress of the Society for Conservation Biology. The theme of the congress was 'Engaging Society in Conservation' and more than 1,300 scientists, practitioners and students of conservation biology from around the globe attended.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
664
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Engaging society in the design of conservation programmes

  1. 1. Engaging Society in the Design of Conservation Programmes Intu Boedhihartono and Jeff Sayer James Cook University
  2. 2. We have tried to engage “society”•Civil society in rich countries•The people who live in tropical forests•Decision makers?•Who should be the target?
  3. 3. Steven Landsburg“People respond to incentives – all the rest is commentary”
  4. 4. • “Engagement” – Engaging = Negotiating – Delivering incentives – PES, REDD, ICDPs
  5. 5. IIED review of 38 PES projects – all failed after 2-3 years
  6. 6. • Indonesia REDD – $1 billion - $30 million to UNDP for planning - $7 million spent on “Reddiness”!
  7. 7. 16 Projects in the Mekong•Maintained status quo•Little real benefit to people•Continuing loss of biodiversity
  8. 8. ICDPs• Congo Basin • $ millions invested • People still poor • Biodiversity still declining
  9. 9. Conservation and Development Indicators
  10. 10. • Development comes with investment• Richer people: – Use land more efficiently – Move to cities – Value their time
  11. 11. So which “society” to “engage”• The people whose decisions are important • The politicians who make decisions • The activists who seek social justice • The corporations who control the land
  12. 12. Threats or outcomes• “Threat based conservation” – good for fund raising, the media etc• But maybe “Results based conservation”• Reinforce the conservation “bottom line”• Engage “industry” & negotiate conservation outcomes CI / Erdi Lazuardi
  13. 13. Place-based conservation• 1983 – WWF/IUCN – field projects• 2011 – Political declarations – media - conferences - money• “Field practitioners no longer valued” yet they engage the relevant sectors of society• Grand Design or Muddling Through (Sayer et al Biotropica 2009)
  14. 14. Thank you

×