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Comparative analysis of indigenous peoples’ rights in Central Africa d’Afrique Centrale

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Cléto Ndikumagenge and Phil René Oyono …

Cléto Ndikumagenge and Phil René Oyono

Presentation for the conference on
Taking stock of smallholders and community forestry
Montpellier France
March 24-26, 2010

Published in: Education

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Comparative Analysis of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights in Central Africa d’Afrique Centrale By Cléto Ndikumagenge and Phil René Oyono (Cameroun et Grands Lacs) © intu
    • 2. Presentation Outline
      • Why a comparative study of Indigenous Peoples’ rights in the Trinational de la Sangha (TNS) and the Great Lakes?
      • Indigenous People confronting the challenge of biodiversity conservation
      • Indigenous Peoples’ rights: Major inadequacies
      • Main lessons learned
      • Conclusions
    • 3. Why a comparative study of Indigenous Peoples’ rights (1)?
    • 4. Why a comparative study of Indigenous Peoples’ rights (1)?
      • Universal Declaration of Human Rights
      • International and national meanings of human rights 
      • IUCN’s Livelihoods and Landscapes Initiative
      • Main lessons learned
    • 5. Indigenous Peoples (1): Reduced to poverty
    • 6. Indigenous Peoples face the challenge of biodiversity conservation (1): Ecoregion Profiles
    • 7. The concept of landscape and its complexity
      • Geographic spaces that are sites of human activity;
      • Encompasses
        • Physical
        • and biological characteristics
        • Institutions
        • People
        • Cultural and spiritual values ;
      • Scope and limits
        • Defined in terms of management objectives as envisioned in the lanscape approach intervention;
      • Adoption of this approach in the convergence plan
      •  
      GAMBA CONKOUATI TRIDOM TNS
    • 8. What is an Indigenous People?
    • 9. Complexity of Rights
      • Traditional human rights
      • Rights extended to negative things
      • Rights to positive services
      • Rights extended to positive processes
      • Ownership rights
    • 10. Rights and Poverty Reduction
      • Rights to basic services
      • Access rights to resources
      • Rights to rural economic activities
      • Rights to benefits from resources
    • 11. Rights and Landscape Sustainability
      • Forest ownership rights
      • Resource control and exploitation rights
      • Right to practice traditional management and conservation forms
      © intu
    • 12. Rights to Benfits from Resources © intu
    • 13. Changes in Household Patterns © intu
    • 14. Changes in Diet © intu
    • 15.
      • Rights to public and political participation
      • Rights to justice and peace
      • Rights to post-conflict services
      • Rights to cultural identityidentité culturelle
      Citizenship Rights
    • 16. Lessons learned (2)
      • Positive influence of organizations involved with indigenous peoples
      • Link between economic and legal development
      • Cameroon’s paradox of abundance
      • Weakness of rights echo a greater socioeconimic vulnerability
      • Sustainable landscapes depend on indigenous practices
    • 17.
      • MERCI BEAUCOUP/ MANY THANKS
    • 18. CONCLUSIONS
      • Programs for sedentarization and improvement in the social status of Indigenous Peoples
      • Isolationist approach has had little impact
      • Dispossession of ancestral rights
      • Inadequate recognition of rights-related questions in strategic documents (MDGs, PRSP..)
      • Need to encourage integrated and non-isolationist approaches to strengthen rights

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