CIFOR in India and South Asia
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CIFOR in India and South Asia

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Louis Verchot, Director of CIFOR’s Forests and Environment Program, outlines the history of CIFOR's work in India and the opportunities the country offers as an entry point into a new research ...

Louis Verchot, Director of CIFOR’s Forests and Environment Program, outlines the history of CIFOR's work in India and the opportunities the country offers as an entry point into a new research programme for South Asia.

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    CIFOR in India and South Asia CIFOR in India and South Asia Presentation Transcript

    • CIFOR in India and South AsiaPresented
by
Louis
Verchot,
Director,
Forests
&
Environment
Research16
April
2013
    • CIFOR in India CIFOR has worked off and on inIndia over the past 15 years 47 publications on India since1997 Forest management Plantations Tenure Livelihoods Carbon Degraded land rehabilitation Drivers of deforestation Governance and rights
    • CIFOR in IndiaWe
have
worked
on
questions
of
sustainable
fuelwood
provisionD.
Pandey,
2002
    • Rehabilitation
of
degraded
lands
through
re‐establishmentof
forests•Carbon
stocks•Water
infiltration•Fodder
value•Erosion
control•Soil
fertility
    • According to FAO – large number offorest dependent people in the regionNation Forest dependentpeoplePeople living onpublic forest landIndia 275 100Nepal 18 8.5Sri Lanka 2-4 ?
    • CIFOR in South Asia: Opportunity for Impact National Mission for a “Green India”: Goals include the afforestationof 6 million hectares of degraded forest lands and expanding forestcover from 23% to 33% of India’s territory. National Mission for Sustaining the Himalayan Ecosystem: The planaims to conserve biodiversity, forest cover, and other ecologicalvalues in the Himalayan region, which will be impacted by climatechange.
    • CIFOR in South Asia: Opportunity for Impact National Mission on Strategic Knowledge for Climate Change: To gaina better understanding of climate science, impacts and challenges,the plan envisions a new Climate Science Research Fund, improvedclimate modeling, and increased international collaboration. It alsoencourages private sector initiatives to develop adaptation andmitigation technologies through venture capital funds.
    • Western Ghats Biodiversity ‘hotspot’ – home to many plant and animal speciesunique to India Broad range of eco-system services flowing to communities Water supply to approx. 245 million people in India, dependent onrivers originating in W. Ghats to sustain their livelihoods Influence on Indian monsoon weather pattern
    • Himalayas Himalayan forest ecosystems range across eight countries includingIndia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Bhutan Its river systems (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra) are the source ofdrinking water, irrigation and hydroelectric power for over 1.5 billionpeople Research opportunity: forest degradation across the Himalayas andimpact on communities
    • A generalized NRM research to impact theory of change We work with partners to identify knowledge gaps that require the support ofan international research effort• Assess the baseline situation – knowledge, actors, interests, coalitions• Determine what needs to change and the obstacles to change• Determine how research can help support change We work with partners to set priorities for knowledge generation• Determine the desired state of society to which the research will ultimately contribute• Determine indicators of progress toward impact (outcomes)• Determine the research products that are needed to produce the outcomes• Plan activities with partners to produce the outputs We implement research with partners and produce knowledge products• Conduct field and lab work and collect data• Analyze data and generate research reports to the scientific community that isvalidated by the peer review process• Produce research products for actors and stakeholders outside the scientificcommunity We disseminate knowledge through different forums to facilitate informeddecision making. More informed decisions or improved practices will lead tobenefits for affected people.
    • A specific theory of change fromCIFOR work on REDD+If we are successful in providing appropriate knowledgeinformation, analysis and tools to policy makers andpractitioners, the implementation of REDD+ will produce:• Real GHG emission reductions (effective)• Cost-effective programs (efficient)• Distribution of costs and benefits (equitable)• Co-benefits- Poverty reduction- Biodiversity and ecosystem integrity- Enhancement of non-carbon ecosystem services- Improvements of local livelihoods- Rights and tenure
    • India: Livelihoods and Governance Joint forest management model Transfer of power to communities Forest Rights Act 2006
    • India: KnowledgesharingCollaborative partnerships: Expertise of Indian scientists Abundance of existing institutionsin India working on sustainableforestry management fordevelopment
    • Visit us at CIFOR.ORG