Berau Forest Carbon Program
      Community Livelihoods
         December 13, 2009
Phases of the program
•Program will seek funding for a 5-year
demonstration phase. It is expected that during
that time, i...
Overview of BFCP


       Production Forest:

         •Spatial planning
          RIL, HCVF /           Planta-
         ...
Challenges for Communities in Indonesia

• 350+ ethnic groups in
  Indonesia                               Berau

• 40-50 ...
TNC Experiences in Berau
• Conflict resolution

• Community protected
  areas

• Collaborative management
                ...
Villages in            UPPER KELAY
                                                Villages in
               Villages in ...
7
Community-company relations


                     • Institutions at village
                       level are weak

      ...
CURRENT SITUATION:

1) Weak village institutions;

2) Low funding from government and companies

3) Elite capture within v...
Overview of the strategy


                              GOVERNANCE
                                of BFCP
              ...
OBJECTIVES FOR BFCP WORKING WITH VILLAGES


• Strong village institutions, decision-
  making processes, and plans
• Incre...
Desired outcome

   Companies              Local                    Other             REDD
                       governme...
OVERALL LESSONS
              • Need to present “no
                regrets” strategies to
                communities—the...
Thank you




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Berau Forest Carbon Program Community Livelihoods

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Presentation by Wahjudi Wardojo, Ministry of Forestry Republic of Indonesia.
Social impacts of REDD initiatives, Forest Day 3.
Sunday, December 13th, 2009
Copenhagen, Denmark

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Berau Forest Carbon Program Community Livelihoods

  1. 1. Berau Forest Carbon Program Community Livelihoods December 13, 2009
  2. 2. Phases of the program •Program will seek funding for a 5-year demonstration phase. It is expected that during that time, international finance mechanisms will be Full agreed to by countries enabling strategies to be Implementation?? scaled up and sustainable financing to be (2013- ) achieved. Berau Forest Carbon Program Demonstration Phase (2010-2015) Development (Oct 08- Jun 10) • Pilot site-based strategies • Strategies implemented – Improved forest across Berau Scoping management • Monitoring and verification • Baseline scenario and – Forest restoration • Expansion to additional (Jan-Sept 08) monitoring approach – Oil palm swap districts and provinces • Refine strategies for – Land-use planning, • Political support reducing deforestation and policies, enforcement degradation • Situational analysis/drivers • Monitoring and verification • Legal issues • Adaptive management • Rough program design • Stakeholder support hypothesis • Funding sources • Identification of partners/ • Business plan contractors
  3. 3. Overview of BFCP Production Forest: •Spatial planning RIL, HCVF / Planta- certification tions: •Capacity building, better siting, •Policy and legal land swaps, framework HCVF, best practices •Community Protected areas: empowerment and REL engagement •better management, •Strategy 1 •Strategy 2 sustainable financing •Strategy 3 •Performance •Historic •Period 1
  4. 4. Challenges for Communities in Indonesia • 350+ ethnic groups in Indonesia Berau • 40-50 million people living in national forest area without recognized rights • Decentralization process resulting in many unclear roles and responsibilities, including related to communities • Highly mobile population 4
  5. 5. TNC Experiences in Berau • Conflict resolution • Community protected areas • Collaborative management PROTEST COMMUNITIES HELP PLAN AND MONITOR AGREEMENT OPERATIONS OF TIMBER NEGOTIATION 5 CONCESSIONS
  6. 6. Villages in UPPER KELAY Villages in Villages in the the area of the are UPPER SEGAH Transmigrant •of Most traditional Daya Villages in area of forest Plantation LOWER coastal Punan and the KELAY Mining Punan people villages • Ambitious plans for Mixture Daya concessions concessions • LOWER SEGAH concessions Gaai dependence on High villages • agricultural conversion COASTAL Dayak groups, Long Duhung, • Various Long Pai • Ethnic diversity and on • forestsdependence Java, Lower communities; Fishing transmigrants from (Pu-nan forests; inter-group Mah-kam), mostly better • conflict,recognize village 20-30 families per Lombok competition Traditional Merabu, Lesan • transportation mangroves Semanting, importance of Samburakat All within timber • Diverse employment: Agriculture important; Dayak, Long • Shifting agriculture, gold Matarintib • concessions • Oil palm expansion Heterogeneous-various • plantations, logging, bird Boy, Long mininggroups from Lanm-cin, Long ethnic primary economic • nest collection rotational Destruction of burial communities divided; activities sago palms, fruit agricultureIsland (Bone, Sulawesi grounds, Sului many conflicts • Opportunistic trees Banjar, • Stronger village institution Makassar, Toraja, trees, honey and by Transitional Long Ayan, Merasak, • excessive land claims Tepian Buah, Ineffective community as a result of previous Kasai Melati Jaya Merapun Bugis) Long Lanuk companies program led development • conflict resolution process by oil palm infrastructure Significant companies Recent road openings Labanan “Modern” Sido Bangen Bena Baru changing transportation Tanjung Batu plans development • Land speculationMakarti • access immigrants will Expected increasing likely put more pressure on mangroves 6
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. Community-company relations • Institutions at village level are weak • Lack of rights makes relations with companies conflict-prone • Unequal power results in low compensation • Local people often outcompeted by outsiders 8
  9. 9. CURRENT SITUATION: 1) Weak village institutions; 2) Low funding from government and companies 3) Elite capture within villages 4) Investments not strategic Companies Local Other gov. budget funds $ $ $ Project 1 Project 2 Project 3
  10. 10. Overview of the strategy GOVERNANCE of BFCP VILLAGES PRIVATE • JOINT WORKING VILLAGE Com- SECTOR GOVERNMENT DEVELOPMENT GROUP Govern- munity PLANNING ment • NEGOTIATION, • ADVISORY • ACCESS RIGHTS/ • COLLABORATION INTER-VILLAGE GROUP LAND TENURE NETWORKS • REDD INCENTIVE • SUPERVISORY • AGRICULTURAL • LIVELIHOODS COUNCIL AGREEMENTS • EXTENSION INCENTIVE AGREEMENTS TO Private • POLICY SLASH • OUTGROWER REDUCE Sector • SPATIAL PLAN AND BURN 10
  11. 11. OBJECTIVES FOR BFCP WORKING WITH VILLAGES • Strong village institutions, decision- making processes, and plans • Increased flow of funding to villages from multiple sources • Funds used for implementing high- leverage projects • Transparency and community monitoring of financial management
  12. 12. Desired outcome Companies Local Other REDD government gov. payments budget funds $ $ $ $ Village development fund Village planning Village development process plan Village implementation mechanisms Project 1 Project 2 Project 3 Project 4 Project 5
  13. 13. OVERALL LESSONS • Need to present “no regrets” strategies to communities—they should not bear risk of uncertainties of REDD policy PICTURE • Many mechanisms exist but need to be operationalized • Bundling of carbon rights can help avoid problems • Need to be realistic about what can be achieved in a short time 13
  14. 14. Thank you 14
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