Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Sharing Higher Education Data - SHED project

1,760

Published on

SHED explored the practicalities of a ‘student-employer’ matching service which would enhance employability learning and serve practical requirements, such as, employers accessing university …

SHED explored the practicalities of a ‘student-employer’ matching service which would enhance employability learning and serve practical requirements, such as, employers accessing university resources, students finding opportunities in the workplace and institutions learning more about the marketplace.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,760
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012JISC Final Report Project InformationProject Identifier To be completed by JISCProject Title Sharing Higher Education Data (SHED)Project Hashtag #shedprojectStart Date 1st June 2011 End Date 30th June 2012 (extension agreed with Programme Manager)Lead Institution University of NottinghamProject Director Dr. Wyn MorganProject Manager Kirstie CoolinContact email Kirstie.Coolin@nottingham.ac.ukPartner Institutions Derby CollegeProject Web URL http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shedProgramme Name Phase 3 Learning and Teaching Innovation GrantProgramme Manager Ruth Drysdale Document InformationAuthor(s) Primary author - Kirstie Coolin Contributions from Mike Leam, Mark Hodgkinson and Richard BellProject Role(s) Project ManagerDate 30th June 2012 Filename SHED Final Report – 1.0 Nottingham.docURL http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/Access This report is for general dissemination Document History Version Date Comments0.1 20/6/12 Draft for comments0.2 22/6/12 Incorporate comments from Derby College0.3 29/6/12 Incorporate comments from Mike Leam1.0 30/6/12 Final as submitted Page 1 of 32Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 - v11.0
  • 2. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Table of Contents ............................................................................................................................................ 11 HEADLINES ............................................................................................................................................... 32 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ............................................................................................................................ 33 PROJECT SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................. 44 MAIN BODY OF REPORT ........................................................................................................................... 5 4.1 PROJECT OUTPUTS AND OUTCOMES ................................................................................................................ 5 4.2 HOW DID YOU GO ABOUT ACHIEVING YOUR OUTPUTS / OUTCOMES?...................................................................... 6 4.3 WHAT DID YOU LEARN? .............................................................................................................................. 10 4.4 IMMEDIATE IMPACT ................................................................................................................................... 14 4.5 FUTURE IMPACT ........................................................................................................................................ 155 CONCLUSIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 166 RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................................................................................. 177 IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FUTURE ............................................................................................................ 188 REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................................... 199 APPENDICES (OPTIONAL) ....................................................................................................................... 20Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 2 of 32
  • 3. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 20121 HeadlinesSHED explored the practicalities of a ‘student-employer’ matching service which wouldenhance employability learning and serve practical requirements, such as, employersaccessing university resources, students finding opportunities in the workplace andinstitutions learning more about the marketplace.The project consisted of:-  Focus groups with small businesses, students and academics  Requirements analysis and the ‘to-be’ vision  Pilot and demonstrator toolsKey questions and points considered within the report are outlined below:-  How can students and employers be motivated to use new tools for employability?  Where do student, employer and institutional requirements meet, and what would this look like in terms of processes and tools?  Can we use existing institutional learning technology to promote student-led employability learning?  How do Further Education requirements differ from Higher Education?  How can institutions open their doors for employers in new ways to present opportunities for students to interact directly?  Can employer engagement be streamlined?  Can business analysis techniques be introduced into learning contexts?2 AcknowledgementsThe SHED project was funded under the JISC Learning and Teaching Innovation GrantPhase 6 programme and ran from May 2011 for one year. It was led by the University ofNottingham’s CIePD in partnership with Derby College. In particular we would like to thankthe following for their input into the project:From the University of Nottingham  Staff from the CIePD, Research and Learning Resources, Information Services  Professor Tom Cross, Associate Professor and Deputy Head of Department, Faculty of Engineering  Steve Upcraft, Business Engagement and Innovation Services and Ingenuity  Andy Beggan, Head of Learning Technologies Section  Wyn Morgan, Director of Teaching and Learning  Caroline Williams, Director of Research and Learning Resources  Focus group students from the Faculty of EngineeringDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 3 of 32
  • 4. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012From Derby College  Mark Hodgkinson, HE/International Manager  Richard Bell, Professional Construction Lecturer and Employer Engagement  Steve Ford, Learning Technologist  Students undertaking the Foundation Degree in Professional ConstructionBusinesses  Jonathan English, Skeleton Productions  Darren Gent Progenitor Solutions  Chris Penfold, Design CognitionOther  Leo Lyons, EAT-PDP Project, University of Kent3 Project Summary3.1 The SHED project was initially scoped building upon findings from previous JISC-fundedprojects. In particular, those which emerged from the CIePD SAMSON project (fundedthrough JISC’s Workforce Development and Lifelong Learning programme), outcomes fromthe Lifelong Learning Networks in the East Midlands and conversations with local employers.It was also devised against the context of the HE White Paper ‘Students at the heart of theSystem’ which concluded that: “The relationship between universities and colleges, students and employers is crucial to ensuring that students experience the higher education they want while studying and leave their course equipped to embark on a rewarding career”(BIS, 2011, p45).3.2 Set also against the background of rising fees, emphasis on student employability and adesire for increased engagement with employers, the project aimed to prototype newmethods of student-employer interaction and develop an architecture that incorporated theindividual requirements of student, employer and institution whilst providing a mutuallysatisfactory ‘meeting point’ or ‘introductory service’ which intersected these differingrequirements. Initially, these were summarised as:-  Developing professionalism; the student need to integrate professional learning, specifically awareness of the marketplace and sector-specific employment opportunities, into their learning  Finding opportunities to enhance employability; improve the accessibility of students to SMEs and vice versa to support e.g. finding placements or employment  Employer (SME) engagement; providing an online space which SMEs would see value in using  Building intelligence; better understanding for institutions and students of the skills needs of the local labour market3.3 The aim was to demonstrate a sustainable and low-cost model that would betransferable to other institutions or whole regions which would simplify student, employerand institutional relationship building.Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 4 of 32
  • 5. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Figure 1: diagram depicting anticipated benefits4 Main Body of Report4.1 Project Outputs and OutcomesOutput / Outcome Type Brief Description and URLs (where applicable)(e.g. report, publication, http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/documents.shtml software, knowledge built)Architecture model Mind map diagram based on user requirements analysesBlog http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eortfolio/shed/Pilots Within reportPilots and associated Employer questionnaire and Student workshop activity used for requirements gathering amaterials discussionBalsamic mock ups Wireframe mock-up used for discussion with employersDetailed requirements All requirements gathered from interviews and focus groups. Some are out of scope, butanalysis considered in the recommendations for future developmentDissemination Flyer Information flyer aimed at stakeholders with an interest in the projectBriefing paper for students A targeted paper produced early on in the project to gain interest from studentsBriefing paper for A targeted paper produced early on in the project to gain interest from SMEsemployersDerby College pilot paper ‘Harmonising Student Learning and Employers Needs’ – a paper written by Richard Bell College setting forward options for providing; employer engagement, employability skills career development for employed and non-employed Higher Education Students within Professional Construction at Derby College.Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 5 of 32
  • 6. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 20124.2 How did you go about achieving your outputs / outcomes?4.2.1 Aims and ObjectivesSHED sought to investigate how innovative technology and use of institutional and student-generated information could help students to integrate professional learning into theirUniversity/College experience and support them to take more responsibility for their ownlearning, through incentivising pro-active behaviours in skill development and employerengagement. The project bid envisaged a technical architecture to facilitate this, illustratedand described below:Figure 2: initial vision of how such an architecture would work  Student and employer submit profile information.  The student builds up information about themselves and their skills, interests and goals within their ePortfolio  The employer submits a profile using a gateway page. This would include information about their particular interests in working with students and the institution.  The employer searches for specific skills which would return an anonymous list of student matches where they could request further information  The student receives notification and decides whether to open up their contact details to the employer  Other sources of institutional information could be added into the employer search, such as curriculum or research data (potentially this could surface relevant participating students through back-end use of curriculum and student IDs)  Anonymous trends would be gathered via user-generated content and search trackingDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 6 of 32
  • 7. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 20124.2.2 MethodologyThe project sought to assess the feasibility and user-appetite for the architecture through aseries of interviews and focus groups and investigation into the availability and readiness ofother institutional data and systems. For end users, the most important (if unstated) questionis “what is in it for me?” Why would a student or employer use a new system or website ifthere were no obvious and direct benefits for them? Therefore, this was the focus for therequirements analyses. The list below describes how users were engaged:-  Briefing papers were developed for SMEs1 and students2.  The project was promoted at the Ingenuity Breakfast event on 12th July 20113.  An early draft of information to capture from employers and workflow was developed (Appendix C).  A wireframe ‘straw man’4 was developed to promote discussion.  Questionnaires were created for students and SMEs (Appendices A and B).  Focus groups were held with students5 from the University of Nottingham and Derby College.  Requirements gathering interviews with three SMEs6 were held.  A seminar, ‘Technology for Employability’ was held at the University of Nottingham on 25th May 2012, mainly attended by academics and the Careers and Employability Service and including a presentation from Jeanne Booth of the Good Work Guide social enterprise on ‘Engaging Employers’.From these activities, a detailed mind map diagram7 and Requirements Catalogue8 wereproduced to support the prototype development. These outputs, plus the wider discussionsgenerated extended beyond the scope of SHED, however, they have been captured and willbe discussed below in section 7.4.2.3 PilotsThe intention was to run a pilot alongside the prototype development focussing on theprofessional learning of students. The University and Derby College had the MaharaePortfolio system already installed so an early decision was made by the project group toassess the suitability of Mahara for storing searchable employability data and allowingflexible access and search. For the immediate purposes of the project, using the Resumésections (see Appendix D) seemed a reasonable starting point. As a tool currently installedand also (during the course of the project) being implemented more widely across theUniversity it would provide an existing vehicle for hosting employability information and aspace in which to promote professional learning amongst students. Furthermore, as an opensource tool there is the potential to directly search its databases and add in functionalityenabling users to release data directly.Derby College ran their first College Mahara pilot with 3 students undertaking theProfessional Construction Foundation Degree. It was important that the pilot fit with theirexisting priorities where impact would be made in the short term. A detailed project1 SME briefing paper - http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/docs/Employer%20Briefing%20Paper%20-%20SHED%20-%20draft%201%20KC.pdf2 Student briefing paper - http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/docs/Student%20Briefing%20Paper%20-%20SHED%20-%20draft%201%20KC.pdf3 http://www.ingenuitygateway.com/News/News/Page-24 Wireframe ‘straw man’ http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/docs/balsamic-shed-talking-point.pdf5 Summary blog post available at http://uilaplep01.nottingham.ac.uk/mahara/view/artefact.php?artefact=14270&view=13366 Summary blog post available at http://uilaplep01.nottingham.ac.uk/mahara/view/artefact.php?artefact=14269&view=13367 Mind Map diagram http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/docs/SHED%20mind%20map.jpeg8 Requirements Analysis http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/docs/SHED%20Requirements%20Catalogue%20v1.pdfDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 7 of 32
  • 8. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012summary9 was written by Richard Bell (Professional Construction Foundation Degree) priorto the pilot who identified a gap in embedded employability learning for students undertakingpart-time HE courses. “Within Professional Construction, employer engagement and employability skills have been refined and developed within a specific frame work for full-time level 3 learners, and has proved to be a great success with employers and students alike providing students with internships, industry mentors and specific enrichment activities. This in turn has highlighted the lack of these activities and concepts within the HE portfolio/offering, and it is against this background that the professional construction team have sought to develop a framework and process that meets the needs of HE students in this respect.” (Harmonising Student Learning and Employers/Industry needs, Richard Bell)These courses contain a mixture of employed and non-employed students so the aim of thispilot was to develop processes around matching non-employed students with employers andto develop student learning to meet the needs of industry as well as career planning, careerdevelopment and promotion for employed students within their existing organisations. Buy-infrom one company in particular was sought early on as co-operation from their linemanagers and HR departments was crucial to gain acceptance of the pilot for the CPDcontext. The company are also keen to ensure that promising employees are not ‘missed’through ensuring their evidence is retained over time. This helps the company, employeeand college to match up their experiences at work with course requirements from the collegeand to see the progression of their employees and evidence to support their investment intraining.A detailed summary of student activity and recommendations arising for the pilot isdocumented on the SHED blog10.4.2.4 DemonstratorFollowing the requirements gathering, a demonstrator was produced. This sought toillustrate requirements from the different stakeholders and demonstrate the workflow andinteraction between students and employers, with an emphasis on employer requirements.The design of the demonstrator reflects the comprehensive and detailed requirements11gathered from local SMEs. Requirements were rigorously prioritised using the standardMoSCoW method to identify the higher priority requirements for implementation. Thedemonstrator was developed as an ASP.NET web application using Visual Studio and waswritten in C#. It was implemented using an N-tier architectural design, comprising anASP.NET web-application running on a web-server, a MySQL database and a CSS-managed presentation layer.‘Proof-of-concept’ functionality demonstrates how an Employer would use the system asshown in the screenshots included in Appendix G. Employers register on the system and indoing so, record their company details as well as registering their preferences as to thetypes of engagement with the University that they are interested in. This data can besubsequently amended as and when required. The core use case illustrated by thedemonstrator is that the Employer searches for a student who meets their (various)requirements. This has been designed as a ‘hybrid’ search approach and as such supports a9 Derby College pilot summary https://docs.google.com/document/d/1OdUcIEsLKDlFPjBXo7OQKFT-t-g3Nc_AW0rvuj-t5Pg/edit?pli=1#heading=h.2dtsn27luc4g10 Derby College SHED pilot blog - http://uilaplep01.nottingham.ac.uk/mahara/view/artefact.php?artefact=14395&view=133611 Requirements Catalogue -http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/docs/SHED%20Requirements%20Catalogue%20v1.pdfDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 8 of 32
  • 9. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012combination of ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ searching. This allows the Employer to eitherrequest to search across all data sources simultaneously (bottom up) or to first select aspecific category within which they wish to search (top-down). This is similar in principle tothe search mechanisms implemented on the BBC and Amazon web-sites and is arguablyemerging as a standard for good practice on commercial web-sites. Specifically, the following use cases are supported by the demonstrator in the form ofcategory searches:-  Employer searches across all data sources  Employer searches for a Student for a Placement  Employer searches for a Student for a Project  Employer searches for a Student for Research Work  Employer searches for a Student on this particular course  Employer searches for a Student with these Goals These category searches relate to, and rely on, corresponding data being entered intoMahara by students wishing to market themselves to Employers. The illustrativeimplementation shown by the demonstrator could be significantly enhanced and improved bythe development of a Mahara Employability plug-in (see section 7) which would enable theinformation searched for by Employers to be captured in a more structured and granularway.Note that in order to meet the requirement (identified during requirements elicitationworkshops) that students retain control of their own data, search results are presented to theemployer in an anonymised format, as illustrated in the screenshots in the Appendix G. TheEmployer then submits a request for permission to view the student’s portfolio which must beaccepted by the student before the Employer can view any further information about thestudent. This reflects the ‘circle of trust’ principles put forward by the EU FP7 TAS3 project.4.2.5 How the project changedSHED was a consultative project. Requirements were gathered as described in paragraph4.2.2 and subsequent findings impacted on the direction of the project. Staff changes meantalso that the technical work was started later than envisioned, so there was a weighting ondefining methods and processes to inform the technical work and recommendations forfurther development.As a part of the Learning and Teaching Innovation programme, the project sought to identifyand trial innovation in:- 1. Incorporating professional learning into student activity 2. Student engagement with employers 3. Integrated workflow around permissions and policies.4.2.6 Initially, it was envisioned that findings from the TAS312 EU project on auditing dataflow and assigning user-specified policies to the data would be used. The TAS3 technologydeveloped for this was in the event rather complex and developmental, requiring significantskills in Unix and C for implementation which were not available for the project, and whichalso would have been surplus to SHED requirements. However, core TAS3 concepts ofpersonal data and ownership have influenced the development of the project and itsrecommendations.12 http://tas3.eu/Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 9 of 32
  • 10. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 20124.2.7 In the event, the demonstrator sought to implement permissions and data release byallowing users (students specifically) to retain control over their personal data through theePortfolio and workflow (as identified in Appendix C) operating via use of database tableflags to enable interaction and iterative release of data between student and employer. Ananonymous search criterion is harvestable for storage in a database for future querying andbusiness intelligence. If this approach were implemented for a large number of users, then asolution would have to consider the storage and analysis of a large and growing dataset.4.2.8 Navigating the dataSHED highlighted the different types of institutional data and issues around their release andaccess.  Student-generated data  Curriculum information  Student record data  Other institutional data of interest to employersThere is a challenge is to find the pathways through the masses of institutional data andactually to determine what could be useful and how it could be presented. There is slow andongoing work to be done in the sector more widely to develop information streams availablevia web services and to review data protection requirements. As with all projects undertakenwith JISC, interoperability and standardisation of data/processes is key. Nottingham isundertaking an XCRI-CAP project with JISC’s Course Data programme13, although resultsservices from this have not been available within the SHED timeframe. A separateCurriculum Mapping project is also running – however, the timings of all of these activitieshave not intersected in a useful way within the project timeframe.4.2.9 The original idea for SHED was an innovative one. The project examined the ‘as-is’and designed the ‘to-be’ processes and functions to enable direct contact between thestudent and employer, bypassing potential administrative hold-ups. The solution drawslessons from the business world, such as recruitment practices and online matchingservices, and examines how these might be suitably applied to HE. Applying iterativeinteraction between student and employer, whether for seeking a placement or receivingfeedback on project work, strengthens the relationship and provides a ‘virtuous circle’,further developing student learning about their professionalism and reinforcing the studentsemployability in the eyes of the employer.For Derby College, SHED saw the first use of Mahara within the College and in particular,enabled the College to innovate in their management of student’s professional learning,using it as a platform for peer development, career reflection and learning from employerinput. Students gather information that is related to employer requirements and from thatlearn how their knowledge appears for an employer. This is not only learning for them, butfor their peers and the College in understanding what sort of information is of interest to theiremployer contacts and how students should be advised to fine tune their employabilityinformation to improve their career prospects.4.3 What did you learn?4.3.1 As discussed in section 4.2.2, the project team engaged with students, employers andacademics throughout the project to inform development and to evaluate our assumptions.13 http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearning/coursedata.aspxDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 10 of 32
  • 11. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012These engagement activities proved extremely useful and informative not only for SHED, butto inform other projects and activities including the concurrent CIePD JISC-fundedESCAPES14 and Ingenuity KnowledgeHub15 projects, the University’s own fledgling Maharaimplementation and new practice in promoting student employability for Derby College.Below are summaries of the key messages extracted from interviews and focus groups.4.3.2 Employers “Many businesses are keen to access universities’ specialist knowledge and are unaware of the R&D capacity available within the student body. For non-engaged companies, particularly SMEs, navigating through the maze of diverse education institutions and courses to find the right skill or contact can be problematic.” (SHED project proposal 2011)Discussions with employers centred on a set of questions (Appendix A) but in actualitydeveloped into broad and rich discussions about how and why they interact with theUniversity. 3 SMEs were interviewed in depth, and the employer view was sought at DerbyCollege on engaging with their employee’s learning.SME engagement with Universities is more inconsistent than that of large blue chipcompanies. At Nottingham, we are fortunate to have a strong and growing community ofSMEs through the Ingenuity network16 and its regular programme of business-focussedevents. This provides an accessible way for SMEs to engage, network and find contacts.Once initial contact with the University has been made, they are put in touch with the areasthey express interest in. This is a huge job to perform manually - so a system which couldsurface relevant information from different departments would be very much desired,particularly as University information is notoriously hard to find due to its distribution acrossdifferent academic schools and departments.Knowledge transfer in a broad sense was identified as a top area of interest which, from theSME viewpoint, could largely be labelled as; expertise, events and research.Students and knowledge transferAs well as an interest in University research, the employers were interested in studentplacements, internships, projects and employment. Small businesses are often on the cuspof growth and innovation, and a good student placement or project can be invaluable at thistime. However, in taking on a placement, the business has to be sure that the benefits forthem (as well as the student) are clear.In summary, the SMEs interviewed viewed the following as desirable:-  A single ‘front door’ to the University - and a hook for engagement  Bite size pieces of information, easily accessible via the web, mobile app or email digest  University events available in one place and filterable  Ability to find students for discrete pieces of work (paid or otherwise)  Access to research and innovation headline information (filtered by interest)  More university engagement with social media for easier personal networking and identifying key contacts14 www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/escapes15 www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/knowledgehub16 http://www.ingenuitygateway.com/Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 11 of 32
  • 12. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012  An online community where students, academics and employers can share ideas and make connections4.3.3 Students “..students will expect a clear return on their investment, including enhanced employability at graduation. Institutions need to seek out creative and cost-effective methods to maximise their students’ employability and enhance meaningful engagement with employers.” (SHED project proposal 2011) “We come to University and assume that employability is getting the degree but are starting to learn that it’s the degree plus other stuff” (student participant in workshop)In order to identify the motivating factors for students to create and share information aboutthemselves, workshops were held with Nottingham and Derby students. The former wereinvited to answer questions (Appendix B) and to discuss their own views on theiremployability as well as the project aims with the team, whereas the latter group wereinterviewed more informally with their lecturer. The University student discussion issummarised below and the Derby student discussion is summarised in section 4.3.4 within awider discussion in a Further Education context.The Nottingham students were a self-selecting and motivated group, all sharing a concernwith finding good employment beyond their studies. They were aware of what constitutesemployability, describing these skills as being interpersonal, resourcefulness, ‘knowing whoto ask’ and managing projects. Work experience and placements are viewed as vital inhelping them to realise their long term career goals.Some interesting points and assumptions raised by the students were:- Course, Skills and Interests  Coursework and team projects are more useful forms of assessment than exams in developing transferable skills.  Module choice is influenced by the reputation of the lecturer, general interest and is generally not considered of interest to the employer.  For some, there is a worry about module choice being too specific and closing down options. For others, specialising early represents a clear idea of future career choice.  Currently, information about employer demand can be found through the careers centres, employer talks and websites.  The importance of extra-curricular activities to gain new skills (student societies etc.) is recognised, however, for engineering students with full timetables, time is an issue. Accessing businesses  The smaller the company, the more specific the skills required.  Summer placements are sought after - these are student-sourced and not a part of the course.  There is less awareness of engineering SMEs when applying for placements.  It is easy to find the household names, but opportunities are competitive. Access to smaller companies is key.  The first job on graduating is seen as a kick-start to a career.Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 12 of 32
  • 13. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012  The engineering job website Gradcracker17 was cited as a good place to find employers, as is engineering magazines, careers fairs and Google.  Personal networking with employers is a good way to find opportunities as is word of mouth from other students or family.  There is an interest in current employer demand, research and growth areas. The students were asked what ideally they would like:-  Clearly presented information via the web (such as Grad cracker).  A university provided, comprehensive and easily accessible list of companies, tagged and searchable by sector, wage bracket, job description and company information (including social responsibility, employee benefits and information about former placements) with the ability to store favourite companies.  Somewhere to browse available placements which the University has secured.  Up to date links to the company application procedures.  Information about company project areas.  Company presentations do not clash with lectures, e.g. breakfast meetings for networking opportunities would be preferable.  Careers fairs with smaller companies represented.  Employment opportunities advertised with a salary specified - not just labelled competitive.  Feedback from employers, and support with interpretation, if unsuccessful.4.3.4 An FE perspectiveSHED presented Derby College with an opportunity to respond to its more immediate needsin trialling new approaches to promote career development and professional understandingwithin the level 4 HE in FE programme. This is discussed fully in ‘E-portfolios – HarmonisingStudent Learning and Employers/Industry Needs’18 (Richard Bell 2012).A focus group (report available in the project blog19) with the students and lecturer from theFoundation Degree in Professional Construction revealed a pragmatic interpretation of theuse and purpose of the ePortfolio and their motivation for recording professionaldevelopment, namely, finding a job and career progression. The group understand the valuein learning how better promote, market and differentiate themselves to potential employersthrough sharing employability data with employers.The pilot has raised issues for Derby College, one of which is company IPR (IntellectualProperty Rights). Whilst on the course, students are made aware of what it is appropriate toupload and to share – this is a part of their professional learning. Introducing an agreed codeof conduct before using the system is one way to alleviate these issues.17 http://www.gradcracker.com/18http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/docs/Harmonizing%20Student%20Learning%20and%20Employers%20Needs%20-%20Derby%20College.pdf19 www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 13 of 32
  • 14. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Continuing engagement with employers is time consuming for college and employers, thelatter not always wanting a constant update on learner and work experience progress. Anyway this can be made easier is desirable, hence the commitment from the HE Manager togrow and embed the work into other HE in FE programmes.However, as with other new e-learning activities, continued success can depend on thecommitment of individuals. This is recognised by the HE Manager who will continue topromote the work (see section 5, conclusions) within the College.4.3.5 Other learning pointsAcademic staff at the University (engaged primarily through the Technology for Employabilityevent on 25th May 2012) emphasised the diversity of students, from those very strategic andmotivated students to those less engaged with their own professional development. Studentsat Nottingham have many opportunities to undertake activities to support their employability,often embedded into their course (collaborative project work for instance), some accessingplacements and internships, student union and societies and the Nottingham AdvantageAward20 to name a few. All Graduates need to be able to articulate their employability skillsand present themselves to employers, and in addition, recognise that the majority ofemployers will be SMEs. Furthermore, a presentation at this event from Jeanne Booth on‘engaging employers’ stated that the top 100 large corporates provide around 30,000vacancies annually whereas there are approximately 350,000 graduates (Wilson Review21paragraph 6.4).The project brought together a diverse steering team, with representation from businessengagement, learning technology, curriculum, technical and management, and for onemeeting, an international perspective from the University’s Malaysia Campus colleagues viavideo link. There were benefits to having a diverse range of perspectives and individualpriorities which helped to define the strategic aims and direction of the project; however, thiscan sometimes lead to ‘scope creep’. SHED uncovered many interesting, highly relevantlearning, outlined further in section 6’s recommendations for further work.Although the project was to trial and test innovation, for which a year-long timeframe isappropriate, in order to take aspects of the innovation and try to embed them can be difficultto achieve in this timeframe. With embedding comes stakeholder commitment whichremoves the high-risk elements of undertaking new practice.4.4 Immediate Impact4.4.1 SHED has uncovered new ideas and approaches to student-employer relationshipswithin the University. The most significant and immediate impact for the University was thatthe evidence arising from employer discussions and the overarching vision behind SHEDenabled a new piece of innovative work to be scoped and evidenced to build more fully onthe SME motivation for accessing and engaging with University resources. The result wasthe JISC BCE Access to Resources project, Ingenuity KnowledgeHub22. The project joinsBusiness Engagement Innovation Services with Community Partnerships, the University ofDerby, Social Enterprise the Good Work Guide and SME In A Fishbowl and is building a newonline community for small businesses whilst utilising semantic technology for surfacingUniversity information (see Appendix H). The long term view is that student employabilityinformation would form a part of the University resource that employers are interested in.20 http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/careers/students/advantageaward/21 http://www.wilsonreview.co.uk/review/graduate-recruitment/22 www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/knowledgehubDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 14 of 32
  • 15. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 20124.4.2 DisseminationStrategic University dissemination occurred through the project Board, containing theDirector of Research and Learning Resources, the Director of Teaching and Learning andthe Director of the Careers and Employability Service.Project dissemination materials were produced and made available at a range of events andconferences, including; ALT-C 2011, EPIC 2011, Technology for Employability (projectevent), Assessment in a Digital Age (University event), AGCAS 2011, JISC events and adhoc meetings with colleagues from other institutions. Further dissemination will occur at theGreenwich Employer Engagement in a Digital Age, EPIC 2012 and ALT-C 2012conferences.4.4.3 Participants in the projectThe Deputy Faculty Head of Engineering at Nottingham has championed the projectthroughout and furthermore will be supporting any spin-off activities with a particularemphasis on teaching and learning. Learning from SHED has cross-fertilised with theNottingham’s ePortfolio Implementation project the CIePD’s JISC-funded ESCAPES project,particularly in relation to student placement learning, evidencing professional skills andstudent motivation to use these tools. The project team remain in contact with the SMEsengaged with during the project which has seeded a new University/employer relationship.The demonstrator also provides a catalyst and talking point for the departments involved andto introduce new ideas and ways of working.4.4.4 Derby College have started to embed the benefits of their pilot within the FoundationDegree programme, although the current uncertainties for FE may put this at risk. However,SHED has provided the College as a whole with their first opportunity to use and assessMahara. Students on the pilot have developed an understanding of what material theyshould be collecting and how to record and present themselves. This forms part of a‘professional mind-set’ being developed through participation in the pilot. The company hasresponded positively to the concepts of being able to view shared student data with interestemerging primarily from one or two of the employer mentors. They see benefits in beingable to keep an overview of their employee activity whilst they undertake rotationalplacement within the company (technical training occurs in at least 3 areas of the company)and to be able to view their evidence.4.4.5 The students are populating their ePortfolios (see Appendix E) with enthusiasm andregular meetings have been arranged by their lecturer over the summer recess.Professionalism via reflective and self-directed learning continues to be promoted, avaluable skill which the CIOB Professional Body is keen to promote. The employer mentorremains positive and is planning to brief other workplace mentors following an evaluationwith his existing trainees. Informal conversations with a construction employer HRrepresentative have revealed an interest in ‘career development’ ePortfolios. From apractical curriculum assessment point, the lecturer is using more typed feedback which isreinforced with one-to-one meetings. This has meant greater time being spent onassessments/assignments that may be used within the student’s e-portfolios.4.5 Future Impact4.5.1 The SHED project represents the skeleton framework for student-employer matchingand interaction. Its constituent parts require further robust and embedded constructionthrough iterative and targeted change. The Ingenuity KnowledgeHub project presents anopportunity to do this for Nottingham, and the Mahara pilot for Derby. At some stage, theDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 15 of 32
  • 16. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012parts need to meet and this is where meaningful interaction will take place. The team areconsidering how to develop further work as outlined in section 7 to strengthen the framework– referred to by a member of the steering team as ‘son of SHED’. The framework andconcepts are designed to be flexible and adaptable for development beyond the project.4.5.2 Future impact of SHED will be realised through Nottingham’s Ingenuity KnowledgeHuband ePortfolio implementation projects (described in section 4.4) and Derby’s continuingwork with level 4 HE students and their employers. A wider group of College staff see thebenefit of the level 4 students sharing elements of their information with level 3 students,demonstrating to them techniques and exemplars for employability early on in their learning.Overall, the value is seen in being able to understand what employers want to see and whatthey are interested in. Students understanding how to ‘sell themselves’ in the employmentmarket and to present another channel for them to differentiate themselves from othercandidates.4.5.3 Support for job-seekingThe intention within Derby College is to carry on the basic concepts trialled with other fulland part-time HE in FE courses to support students in finding jobs – although, this may besubject to the uncertain FE funding situation. Where the employer mentor defines what theywant to see, this may determine how students who are not currently in employment structureand present their information, giving a greater understanding of what employers want to seemore generally. Employer interaction with the employee’s ePortfolio will enable all studentsto fine tune their shared information thus providing a valuable insight into employerrequirements, helping inform the whole cohort, not just those in work.4.5.4 However, would employers be interested in viewing a student’s ePortfoio showcasepage? For the Derby students, this provides another channel for students to use to promoteand market themselves to potential employers. Having the supporting information,incorporating personal and professional achievements, differentiates the candidate toemployers (see Appendix E). Participants recognise the value in being able to quickly pulltogether customised ‘views’ for different applications based on existing personal content.Their showcase can be used to supplement/enhance the paper application where existingprocesses restrict the application format. Once a link is provided within an email, it is alsoeasier to be passed on within the company or through personal networks. Building intracking as to who has accessed the shared information and how many times is desirable,and can be done through some bespoke reporting either via Mahara or through the SHEDarchitecture and could potentially be as simple as a read receipt or hit counter, or providingstats back to the user via Google Analytics. This is an important part of assessing howeffective the channel is.5 Conclusions5.1 Employability for students and employers is a practical concern. Course and careerlearning as well as the practicalities of finding placements, internships and work do not existin isolation. Students need to know what employers are looking for and how to access themas well as being able to analyse, recognise the value of, assess and showcase theiremployability and subject-related skills to employers. This typically might integrate with moretraditional Personal Development Planning (PDP) activities, but essentially needs to form anembedded and valued part of student learning. The HEA state:Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 16 of 32
  • 17. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012 “Employability can be enhanced through personal development planning, but success will depend upon the extent to which students see a ‘pay-off’ for the effort that they put in.” 23(Embedding employability into the curriculum, HEA)For students, the ‘pay off’ may constitute short term interaction with employers for seekingwork or work-experience which also provides real-world learning about the sectors they areinterested in.5.2 For employers, involvement with Institutional systems needs to present them withimmediate and tangible benefits; for instance, finding a project or placement student faster, aconfidential way to source short-term talent or the ability to focus on applicants from anappropriate area. Any system or interface needs to be easy to deal with and actually useful.5.3 Introducing new systems or processes, communicating with users and building upnumbers is time-consuming. Where systems exist and are already being used then buildingupon these is a sensible option, for instance, the current ePortfolio or a well-used businessnetwork.5.4 Institutional tools enable students to develop professional habits of reflection and self-awareness in a secure environment. Students use social networking tools. Professionalnetworking tools such as LinkedIn offering showcasing and CV functions are important alsoin presenting employers and learning about the marketplace, thus arguably form part ofemployability learning as well as learning about how best to use these tools for careerprogression.6 Recommendations6.1 General recommendations and recommendations for the wider community  Meaningful employability and professional learning practices ought to be embedded into day to day student use of learning technologies and tools  Consider how a continuation of the above practices could be offered to Alumni (see Kent’s EAT-PDP24 project) in a cost effective way to maintain engagement and offer a useful service.  Students would benefit from a form of access to the university employer contacts.  Make it easier for students to develop their own relationships with employers.  Review PDP practices alongside practical employability concerns for students.  Promote institutional ePortfolio use for direct student benefit (e.g. a marketing tool for students to match themselves to employers).  Cement the understanding of employability skills and what they mean for the institution, track and present marketplace intelligence to inform institutional employability practice.  Continued effort on employer engagement.  ‘Build it and they will come’ does not generally work. Remove barriers to systems and processes, for instance, for employers, consider using LinkedIn login criteria for access to systems.23http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/documents/employability/id460_embedding_employability_into_the_curriculum_338.pdf24 http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/eatpdp/2012/04/17/developing-the-student-catalogue/Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 17 of 32
  • 18. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012  Develop a clear understanding of what useful institutional information is held which is of interest to employers.  Use more communication and networking tools to support career learning.  Work towards standardising institutional datasets to aid discovery.6.2 Recommendations for JISC  Further funding work to develop and embed employability tools (section 7).  Join BCE and eLearning programme outcomes.  Develop a future eLearning theme around developing employability.  While new approaches have been identified, a longer project would be beneficial to support further change and embedding.  Further work to promote institutional open data and put in place the institutional infrastructure.  Promote benefits of why investment in the above is important, specifically aimed at non-technical audiences (XCRI-CAP being a good example).  FEIs in particular are operating in an increasingly uncertain world. It is important JISC recognise this and offer more contextual support for responding to immediate needs.  Both partners would welcome dissemination through JISC publication or the On Air radio programme. Case studies helps to promote esteem within the institution and help to embed new practice.7 Implications for the future7.1 The SHED project has enabled the two institutions to investigate and trial parts of astudent-employer matching service. The issues arising are useful for project partners as wellas the wider HE and FE community. Documentation, in particular the requirementscatalogue25 and mind map provide materials to build upon. These will be accessible from theCIePD website indefinitely.7.2 Where next?The team unearthed other possibilities arising from the SHED project work which largelyemerged from requirements gathering. These are suggested developments which couldpromote the employability of students in a low cost and student-focussed way:-7.3 Employability toolsThere is the potential to develop a range of tools which could be plugged into anexisting/used eLearning system, such as an ePortfolio through use of widgets, plugins orother module technology. These further ideas turn the SHED architecture around, placingstudents in the position of ‘actor’ rather than ‘resource’. Possible tools may include:- a) Access to University-engaged employers (CRM headline information/business from the Ingenuity KnowledgeHub community) b) A place to view employer opportunities (e.g. unfinished projects, placement offers etc.) c) Tagging and storing ‘favourite’ employers d) An enhanced and structured employability profile e) Tool to find and collaborate with fellow-students to pool resources for responding to employer project needs for placements/internships or work.25 http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/shed/documents.shtmlDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 18 of 32
  • 19. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012 f) Social media connections – e.g. drawing information from ePortfolio status updates into Facebook, rather than vice versa (which seems to be the norm at present) g) Development and release of richer evidence for job seeking (see Note)For further information on requirements gathered to inform the above, refer to Appendix F.Note: The team consulted with Leo Lyons of the University of Kent EAT-PDP 26project whichis developing a ‘Student Catalogue’. On completion of the project a Mahara plug-in will beavailable that enagles Google Search Appliance searching of alumni ‘pages’ built specificallyto expose to potential employers.7.4 Continued work on institutional web services and data standardisationTo underpin the flow and access to information both internally and externally, institutionsmust continue to build on initiatives such as XCRI-CAP and Open Data to provide the datastructures necessary for realising fit for purpose services in the long term. For instance,development of a web service and open data directory would enable data to be re-used andshared either internally or externally according to as yet unpredicted user requirements.  Centralisation of approach (particularly when supplying services)  Unified approach to data and information - use of RSS, data standards and web services plus common tagging to enable aggregating and search across different data sets7.5 Potential for CollaborationA future impact envisaged at the time of writing the bid was a long-term regional serviceallowing employers to connect with students and resource from different institutionsdepending on their interest. Employers are interested in resources and knowledge of aparticular type regardless of the institution. Regional Development Agencies would possiblyhave provided a central point for such a service, but in their absence, there would either bereliance on individual institutions to collaborate or for students to opt-in to share data outsideof the institution. In theory, this could present a valuable resource for students to market theirknowledge and specialisms to interested employers.8 ReferencesDirect references are presented inline. The following present either foundations of evidenceto underpin the project or work referenced or developed during the project.  EAT PDP University of Kent http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/eatpdp/2012/04/17/developing-the-student-catalogue/  Ingenuity KnowledgeHub http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/knowledgehub/  EU FP7 Tas3 http://tas3.eu  University of Greenwich GWizards http://www.cms.gre.ac.uk/enterprise/gwizards/  SAMSON and ESCAPES projects http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/eportfolio/  JISC LLLWFD projects http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearning/workforcedev.aspx  JISC FSD programme/Infonet http://www.jiscinfonet.ac.uk/flexible-service-delivery/programme26 http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/eatpdp/2012/04/17/developing-the-student-catalogue/Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 19 of 32
  • 20. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012  JISC BCE Programme http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/bce.aspx  Grant, S. (2009) Electronic Portfolios: Personal information, personal development and personal values. Chandos. ISBN: 9781843344018  http://www.graduatesyorkshire.co.uk/internships  http://www.milkround.com/  http://www.grb.uk.com/  http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/bce/stream4.aspx  http://www.jiscinfonet.ac.uk/infokits/collaborative-tools/context-tools9 Appendices (optional)Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 20 of 32
  • 21. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Appendix A – Interview questions for employersDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 21 of 32
  • 22. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Appendix B – Student focus group activity worksheetSHED Workshop ActivityName______________________________________Year______________________________________Course_____________________________________Please answer the following questions on your own and then discusswith your neighbours. We will revisit the Activity following thepresentation.A: Your course, skills and interests1. How is employability a concern for you?2. Do you know what career you want?3. What influences your module choices?4. How might you find out about employer demand for particular skills (including ‘transferable’ skills)?Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 22 of 32
  • 23. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012B: Accessing businesses5. What might your reasons for wanting to interact with an employer be? E.g. placements, networking, internships, employment, other6. How would you go about finding and contacting employers?7. How do you think the University could/should help you to access employers?8. What information about you and your course do you think employers might be interested in?C: In an ideal world…9. If there were a system which allowed you and an employer to find out about each other in a secure way, what would it look like?10.What sort of information would you want from employers?11.What might the issues about accessing this information be? Please revisit your answers after you have heard the presentation and note any further thoughts/changesDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 23 of 32
  • 24. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Appendix C - Process for employer search and workflowAction Enhancement or processStudent populates their profile, and resume New button added to Mahara ‘makeinformation (including goals, achievements searchable for Employer Portal (beta)’and interests)They will be directed to e.g. fill in ‘interested <new db table save userid/artefactid/date>in’ e.g. placement, research project, generalopportunities etc. <new table access log userid/artefactid/employerid/datestamp>Student clicks button to make their data New record within shed accessavailable anonymouslyEmployer registers on portal and fills in Create user credentials.profile. RecordCan edit profile at any time.  id (auto)  ?Vat number? Check  name*  location* (from google map to record lat/long ideally? Investigate tying in with google places?)  A bit about the company*  sector* (from SIC list?) (future potential to access other sources of data)  Interest keywords* – separate by comma for building keyword/tag cloud through usage)  Interested in* (offering placement/student for internship/providing employment/research?? / other - specify) Market Research questions  Have you contact with the University before? Detail?  Are there areas you would like to pursue (drop down list from BEIS/other)Employer logs in. Query available data, return anonymousSees search results based on their information.registration details (interest keywords,interested in)Employer refines search Interest keywords Interested in (note, does not change registration information) Update access log, save new data in ‘event log’Employer expresses interest in a student “ we have n matches on the search term X” Click to view” Pull through available artefacts. Button for employer ‘do you want to contact thisDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 24 of 32
  • 25. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012 student? If so, an email will be sent to the student who will be able then to view your profile and initiate contact’ If yes:Student receives email confirming that there Student clicks link – accesses employerhad been interest in your profile. Email profile.contains a link to the employer profile Button ‘share your profile with this employer’ (protected URL?)Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 25 of 32
  • 26. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Appendix D – Mahara Resumé sectionDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 26 of 32
  • 27. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Appendix E – Derby College pilots (screenshots)Below is a screenshot from a Derby College pilot participant’s ePortfolio. He has shared thiswith his employers and it includes a mixture of personal achievements, scanned newsclippings, qualifications, technical certificates and training reviews.Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 27 of 32
  • 28. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Appendix F – Requirements for Employability tools_________________________________________________________________________________ (1) Employer Search Functionality (Plug-in will allow Students will record information to be searched on)F1.01 - Employer searches for a student to match their requirementsEmployer searches for a student with specific skills and competencies to match their requirementsF2.06 - Student records Employability EvidenceStudents record their skills, competencies, employment experience and accomplishments to theirpersonal portfolio enable them to demonstrate evidence of employability_________________________________________________________________________________F1.01.06 - Employer searches for a student with particular goalsEmployer searches for a student with goals and aspirations that match what the Employer is offering(goals, type of work/duration of work/geographical area/working hours etc)F2.05 - Student records employment goalsStudents record their aspirations e.g. their goals, geographical areas/sectors/roles/working hoursthey’re interested in working in to enable to Employers to search and locate them according to theirpreferences_________________________________________________________________________________ (2) Student Search Functionality (Plug-in will provide interface for student to perform search)F1.04.01 - Employer records skills and competencies requiredEmployer records the high-level skills and competencies required for their organisation (as opposed tofor a specific vacancy). The employer would effectively define an high-level job description at theorganisation level which the students could then search against and compare with their profileF2.02.02 - Student searches for Employer CompetenciesStudent searches for qualities and competencies required within a specific organization_________________________________________________________________________________F1.04.03 - Employer records their company detailsEmployer records their company name, location and optionally their address and post code,telephone number, email address, web page, vacancies URL, Company Number, VAT number andSector (SIC Code)F1.04.04 - Employer records their company profile informationEmployer can (optionally) record information about their company, its culture, size and their intereststhat is relevant to the University and it’s students e.g. a synopsis and keywordsF1.04.05 - Employer records what types of opportunities they offerEmployer records whether they are interested in offering Placements, Internships, Permanent jobs,Research opportunitiesF1.04.07 - Employer records what areas of the curriculum map to their businessEmployer records what areas of the curriculum map to their business and are therefore of interest tothem in terms of engagement, student recruitment etcF1.04.02 - Employer records a list of unfinished projectsDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 28 of 32
  • 29. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Employer records a list of outstanding projects that they need to complete so that the university canpotentially engage with them and provide resources/consultancy to complete themF2.02.01 - Student searches for prospective EmployerStudent searches for an employer who is looking for a student with their skills/competencies andmatches their interests and personal requirements. Search could include Sector, Keywords relating toskills/competencies/interests, Region/Geographical area, Salary Offered. Progenitor Solutionssuggested using Amazon-style suggestions to try and help fill hard-to-fill vacanciesDocument title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 29 of 32
  • 30. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Appendix G – Demonstrator screenshotsG1 - Design of home page interface for demonstrator purposesG2 – Capture employer information 1G3 – Capture employer interests (to aid search and matching)Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 30 of 32
  • 31. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012G4 – Employer searchG5 – Anonymised search resultsG6 – Submit request to student – introductory email sent (Note: in principle, this alert could bereceived as a text message or Mahara activity alert).Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 31 of 32
  • 32. Project Identifier: SHED LTIG project University of NottinghamVersion: 1Contact: Kirstie Coolin, CIePD, University of NottinghamDate: 30th June 2012Appendix H – Prototype for Ingenuity KnowledgeHub employer interfaceThis is a screenshot developed by Zabisco for the JISC-funded CIePD project, IngenuityKnowledgeHub. While not a part of the SHED project, it illustrates the evolution of ideas andembedding of employer requirements into further activity. The two elements being developed forIngenuity KnowledgeHub are the ‘Fishbowl’ and ‘Semantic Search’ (developed by the University ofDerby’s DISYS). These represent a combination of a useful employer community tool and apresentation of useful University resources. These elements sit within the University of Nottingham’sIngenuity Network website, a successful SME engagement tool. In the long term, student profilescould form an area for search by employers.Document title: JISC Final Report TemplateLast updated : Feb 2011 – v11.0 Page 32 of 32

×