Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Poster12A: Farmers' adaptive management: key factor in wider adoption of climbing beans in Rwanda
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Poster12A: Farmers' adaptive management: key factor in wider adoption of climbing beans in Rwanda

965
views

Published on

ciatapr10, ciat, poster, "poster Exhibit", beans, frijol, Agbio

ciatapr10, ciat, poster, "poster Exhibit", beans, frijol, Agbio

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
965
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Farmers’ Adaptive Management:  Key factor in wider adoption of climbing beans in Rwanda  J.C. Rubyogo (CIAT/PABRA), D. Mukankubana (ISAR),  A. Musoni (ISAR),  L. Sperling (CIAT) and R.Buruchara (CIAT‐PABRA)  Innovative and adaptive capacities of farmers Context background  Beans are a key food crop in Rwanda  with an  • Before  1985, climbing beans were mainly  estimated area of  300,000 ha/year about 22% of  grown by farmers  in the north‐west of  Rwanda  (less than 10% of farmers in Rwanda)  arable land and second to banana .   The annual   on very fertile soils (volcanic) and in  bimodal  bean consumption is estimated at 60 kg per capita  good rainfall   per year. The adoption and wider use of climbing in  • The use of organic soil amendments and  Rwanda is a result of  several factors including  chemical fertilizers were quasi inexistent   farmers’ capacities to innovate and  adopt  additional  • Farmers were mainly planting less vigorous  technologies and attitudinal changes  such as:  climbing bean varieties and using    Pennisetum  Purpereum (elephant grass) or cassava sticks as  staking materials (see photo on left side)  • staking techniques and stake management  • For food security reasons and risk aversion ,  • Use of highly  appreciate Improved varieties  farmers were mixing  bush and climbing beans   •Improved soil fertility   management  varieties  •Changing cropping systems  • Farmers practiced broadcasted planting  • market responsiveness  • Most of farm work related to beans was left to  •Gender work redistribution  female farmers  Changes in the cropping systems : What were  early farmers’ changes with the introduction of  Other  changes: stakes and their  climbing bean technologies in Rwanda? management Row planting rather than usual broadcasting to  ease the weeding and staking  Farmers in north west of Rwanda (traditional zone of climbing  Elephant grass/bamboo, eucalyptus, grevillea  Two weedings. The first one is done some  beans) knew that local  climbing beans  varieties expressed  sp branches are predominantly used as  weeks before flowering and it is carried using a  higher yield potential (twice)  than local bush bean mixtures  staking materials. After harvesting beans , the  hoe and the second one is hand weeding.   especially on better soils.  However,  the wider use of climbing stakes are collected and kept either in the  Use of pure climbing varieties at most three  bean varieties was hindered by farmers’ concerns related to  house compound or in bean field for reuses of  especially highly preferred by the market . white  staking materials  especially the unavailability of stakes or/and  about 4‐8 seasons for hardwood and 1‐2  pea beans , yellows and red mottled   cost such as manpower to cut and transport them to the field.  seasons for non wood  materials . To avoid  Efficient (localized ) organic manure  rot,  bunches  of stakes are kept at  an angle  supplemented more  by chemical fertilizers   With the introduction of highly productive and preferred  of 450 and  bottom  ends looking up.   especially the DAP therefore increasing P  climbing bean varieties by the Institut des Sciences  availability in the soil. The efficient manure use  Agronomiques du Rwanda (ISAR) and the International Center  reduces the amount by half (about 10 tones/ha)   for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), farmers started intensifying   climbing beans by using  stakes from the elephant grass  Changes in gender roles  planted on the hedges of anti‐erosion contour lines closer to  The  increased bean productivity coupled   climbing bean fields. This  reduced the costs of transporting the  with use of more marketable bean varieties  stakes.  have stimulated the participation of men  farmers in climbing bean production. For  As benefits resulting from the use of climbing beans were  instance row planting, manure/fertilizer  increasingly being visible especially  high bean productivity and  application, collect of stakes and staking and  high return to land which is very scarce in Rwanda, many  weeding are now carried out by both men  farmers in both traditional and non traditional climbing zones   and women .  The weeding  of row planted  adopted and adapted   the technology. This wider e adoption  beans has also attracted men because they  led to the deeper changes in the cropping systems, social and  use large/normal hoes while in traditional  agricultural policy changes  broadcasted planting, the weeding is carried  Climbing beans in  consolidated land out using a small hoe called Nyirabunyagwa.  Culturally is not acceptable for men to use  this farm implement. .  On going research efforts to address  high demand of staking materials  Though farmers have adapted climbing bean technology and its components, the concerns of staking materials and  cost are still an handicap for many more farmers who want to expand the climbing beans especially in non  traditional climbing beans (photo below on left side). There is a need to devise cost effective staking approaches.  ISAR bean team with PABRA support, is developing several staking techniques and materials (see photo below on  right).  Partners •Institut des Sciences Agronomiques du  Rwanda (ISAR)  •Development Rural du Nord (DRN)  •Urugaga Imbaraga  •Rwanda Agricultural Development Authority  (RADA)  On going research effort using fewer  poles  Pan‐African Bean Research Alliance(PABRA)  Staking beans with elephant  Multi season stake management  by  and strings  may  reduce stakes at  15,000  grass and a stone farmers stakes/ha rather than the usual of 50,000 CIAT‐Bean Programme  Take home messages : 1. Expose farmers  to relevant technologies  and making available  to them  helps them to strengthen their innovation capacities for further adaptation and expansion  2. The way Rwandan farmers adapted climbing bean technology and its components is an important source of inspiration  and education for any body interested in  agricultural changes and development  3. The relevance of climbing bean technology has attracted the support from the Rwanda  agricultural policy and decision makers  who  intend to  support the use  of  climbing beans in middle and lower attitude  under the land consolidation policy