Breeding of Climbing Beans for Biotic Resistance and
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Poster6: Breeding of climbing beans for biotic resistance and nutritional quality

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Poster6: Breeding of climbing beans for biotic resistance and nutritional quality

  1. 1. Breeding of Climbing Beans for Biotic Resistance and Nutritional Quality M. W. Blair, F. Monserrate, P. Kimani, R. Chirwa, A. Musoni, A. Namayanja R. Buruchara. I. Wagara, G. Mosquera, C. Jara, S. Beebe, C. Cajiao, I. Roa, M. Castaño, F. Morales CIAT - International Center for Tropical Agriculture, ECABREN, SABRN, Univ. Nairobi, ISAR-Rwanda, NARO-Uganda Introduction Figures and Photographs Climbing beans have certain advantages and needs from a breeding perspective Advantages: Climbing beans have been an important component of traditional agriculture in Central and South America for centuries and have spread to highland areas of East Africa. The most outstanding characteristic of climbing beans is their high yield potential (up to 4,750 kg / ha). They can be grown even in small spaces such as backyard gardens. Climbing beans create a highly productive, sustainable agricultural ecosystem that provides ground cover, good weed control, high biomass and elevated nitrogen fixation. Climbing beans can come in many commercial classes some of which command premium prices and are a valuable source of employment due to continuous harvest (green and dry beans). They are therefore a good alternative for small farms and for producers who need a valuable crop for both food security and income generation. Figure 2. Pod and seed colors typical of the Andean climbing beans developed in Breeding Needs: the MAC (mid-altitude climber) and MBC (mid-altitude BCMNV resistant) series. The majority of climbing beans come from high elevation (1500 masl +) cool-growing environments and have never been selected in lower elevation (500 –1500 masl) for heat tolerance and adaptation. They also have not been subjected to intense breeding yet so are Figure 3. MAC climbing lacking many modern disease or insect resistance genes. Therefore, there is an urgent need to Figure 4. MBC line nurseries selected with marker assisted selection beans – derived from develop more mid-altitude climbing (MAC) beans with valuable new traits. for bc-3 resistance and mid-elevation adaptation. Durango or Andean bush x Andean climber crosses Breeding Process Pedigrees Breeding process involves multiple cycles of selection for adaptation to low elevations (1000 to 1500 msal), to biotic resistance through marker assisted MAM39 x ICA Viboral selection (for BCMNV resistance) and for prevalent disease isolates (ALS and Puebla 444 x ICA Viboral root rots) as well as for nutritional quality in each cycle and in multiple AND930 x ICA Viboral generations. SUG92 x ICA Viboral Rojo 70 x LAS399 Development of MNC and NUC lines (Mid-altitude and Nutrition Climbers) Flor de Mayo x LAS399 100 DRK49 x LAS399 Triple, double Figure 5. Selection for productivity and new seed colours (e.g. yellow) and backcrosses Crosses with inter- Dore de Kirundo x LAS399 with MAC and Development of MBC lines specifics LAS399 x ICA Viboral 80 MBC lines through MAS Iron (ppm) Deevelopment (bc-3 gene) Screening for ALS resistance Best MAC lines (AND277, G5686, G10474, 65 of MAC lines G10909 and MEX 54) MAC7 and Identification of Biofortified varieties should have MAC12 donor parents the agronomic characteristics of MAC13 50 the MAC and MBC lines as well as enhanced nutritional quality MAC27 MAC34 MAC49 2004 2008 2012 2016 MAC35 Cycles of selection MAC56 MAC57 Figure 1. Scheme for development of MBC, MNC and NUC lines in MAC64 Figure 6. Final users are researchers and farmers in the ECABREN/ SABRN regions such as this the climbing bean breeding program. seller of MAC12 in Mozambique, and MAC49 seed multiplication and a bean farmer in Rwanda. Strategies and Methods Future Directions Varietal Releases (final success) success) Nutritional evaluation has been conducted across various labs (Aarhus Univ. Incorporation of the full set of donor parents will take time but is underway (Denmark), Adelaide (Australia), CIAT (Analytical Services), Cornell (USDA Country Genotype Seed Institutions lab), Univ. Narobi (Kenya). Angular leaf spot (ALS) and bean common mosaic Color necrosis virus (BCMNV) evaluations along with marker assisted selection (MAS) for resistance (R) genes is being conducted in CIAT laboratories and at Donor parents for iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) Donor parents for iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) Donor parents for iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) Colombia MAC13, MBC46 RM IPRA / CIAT field sites in Colombia, Kenya, Malawi and Uganda. Adaptation in D.R. Congo and Rwanda has been tested in various locations. Core collection genotypes: G14519, G21242, G23823E Core collection genotypes: G14519, G21242, G23823E Core collection genotypes: G14519, G21242, G23823E Evaluation across mineral methods: Local Varieties: e.g. AND620 (ECABREN), Cerinza (Colombia) Local Varieties: e.g. AND620 (ECABREN), Cerinza (Colombia) Local Varieties: e.g. AND620 (ECABREN), Cerinza (Colombia) Kenya MAC13, 34, 64 CM/LR/ Univ. Nairobi / RM KARI / Egerton Advanced bush bean lines: BID29, BID115, NUA35, NUA56 … Advanced bush bean lines: BID29, BID115, NUA35, NUA56 … Advanced bush bean lines: BID29, BID115, NUA35, NUA56 … University Sufficient variability exists Sufficient variability exists Sufficient variability exists Malawi pending CM/RM SABRN AAS Effect of iron and zinc increase does not decrease Effect of iron and zinc increase does not decrease Effect of iron and zinc increase does not decrease yields or acceptability when used in crosses yields or acceptability when used in crosses yields or acceptability when used in crosses ICP Mozamb. pending RM SABRN NIRS Rwanda MAC9, 44, 49 RM ISAR G14519 G23823E RADICAL RADICAL RADICAL G14519 G14519 G23823E G23823E G21242 G21242 NUA35 NUA35 G21242 CERINZA NUA35 CERINZA CERINZA Uganda MAC31 (Sug 31) CM NARO / CIAT Preference experiments NABE12 Pyramiding into climbing beans is a challenge given Cooking time / taste the need to make complex crosses and engage in gamete selection combined with up to six generations Acknowledgements Hard-to-cook of pedigree selection to obtain stability. Funding from CIAT core, CIDA-Canada, DFID-UK, DANIDA-Denmark, Harvest Plus program and USAID-USA are gratefully acknowledged. Fotos from M. Blair, N. Palmer and R. Chirwa.

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