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PresentersCharles AguillonAssociate Principal for Teaching & LearningGeorgetown East View HS, Georgetown ISDKay PaytonChor...
Agenda10:00-10:30   Introduction and Background10:30-10:50   7E Model10:50-11:05   Break11:05-11:35   Module 1—Aural Cultu...
What are your initial thoughts whenyou think of music andtechnology?Would you describe yourself as“tech savvy”?
When you see this music lab, doesit make you want to:A: ScreamB. LaughC. Learn more
How many of you are a little anxiouswhen you think of teaching music andtechnology?How many of you are anxious when youthi...
Students Face Big Challenges• Global competition for skilled workers—a  war for “talent”• Jobs in vertical markets that do...
Schools Face Big Challenges“Nearly half (47%) of former studentssurveyed said a major factor in theirdecision to drop out ...
Fine Arts Educators       Face Big Challenges• Budget cuts• Students overwhelmed or disengaged• Lack of parent and communi...
We are losing our students to boredomand lack of relevance.The arts can provide solutions toaddress many of the challenges...
Arts and Digital Media Series• Designed to teach 21st century  workforce skills in the creative  media arts• 2009-12 Art a...
Texas Policy Support: StandardsTexas EssentialKnowledge andSkills for Fine ArtsTexas EssentialKnowledge andSkills forTechn...
Music and Media Communications                   Creates                   relevancy                   Teaches vital      ...
TEA-Approved Innovative Course• Course pilot: 2012-2013 school year• PEIMS Code: N1170160• Abbreviation: MUMECOM• State el...
Music and Media Communications• Open to students not participating in  traditional music classes/groups• Explores student ...
Music and Media Communications Essential Knowledge and Skills 1.) Perception & Information Acquisition 2.) Creative Expres...
7E Lesson Framework
7E FrameworkElicit—Access prior knowledgeEngage—Stimulate interest/thinkingExplore—Observe, experiment, interpretExplain—I...
7E Example: Pitch, Chords, Rhythm Elicit Engage Explore Explain Elaborate Evaluate Extend
The Times Are A Changin’How has access to music changed for the typical consumer over the last several decades?At your tab...
A different approach to technology            integration…
Module 1: Aural Culture and Identity
Module 1: Aural Culture andIdentity• Foundational musical concepts/vocab• Musical genres, styles, components• Music histor...
Module 1Lesson 1—Music of My Life, Part 1Lesson 2—Music of My Life, Part 2Lesson 3—Creating a Musical Timeline
Module 1: Music of My Life-Part 1• Musical vocabulary• What do we hear in our everyday life?• How do we compare/contrast w...
Module 1: Music of My Life-Part 1• Break into groups of 3-4• Look at your assigned URLs and complete  the worksheet.•   Ma...
Module 1: Music of My Life-Part 2• Billboard Charts• How did popular music become popular?• Compare and contrast genres• W...
Module 1: Musical Timelines• Musical timeline with list of composers from  each of the main historical periods• Groups are...
Module 2: Imagination and Ideas
Module 2: Imagination and Ideas• Examine emotional components of music• Analyze music in media• Organize and create musica...
Module 2: Imagination and IdeasLesson 1: The Possibilities of Digital SoundLesson 2: Music and the MessageLesson 3: Captur...
Module 2: Possibilities of Digital SoundDigitize Me! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0FzjETQsQc•Bring this lesson to their...
Module 2: Possibilities of Digital Sound• The first lesson in this module encourages  students to explore techniques to cr...
Module 2: Possibilities of Digital Sound• Let’s take a brief look at Audacity  http://audacity.sourceforge.net/
Module 2: Music and the Message• This lesson focuses on having students analyze  music and how it conveys different types ...
Module 2: Capture Your IdeasLesson 3:  • Students begin looking at some basic    notation concepts  • Projects have studen...
Module 2: Capture Your Ideas• Students willexplore byimporting thefamiliar “Ode to Joy”theme• There is a“quick start” tuto...
Module 2: Capture Your IdeasACTIVITY:•If you have a computer, download FinaleNotePad and let’s see how quick it is forstud...
Module 2: Music and Society • Reflect on the impact of technology on music and how   communities distribute and share musi...
Module 3: Careers in Music—Collaboration and Communication
Module 3: Careers in Music• Performance/writing, business/management,  recording/technical, gaming/new media• Research opp...
Module 3: Careers in MusicLesson 1: Music AvocationsLesson 2: Performance and ManagementLesson 3: Technical ProfessionsLes...
Module 3: Sample ActivityHow many artists can you connect totheir accomplishments?
H    1. Dolly PartonD    2. Lionel RitchieA    3. Leonard BernsteinJ    4. Ricky SkaggsO    5. Christina PerriK    6. John...
Module 3: Careers in Music• Careers in Music website www.careersinmusic.com• Degree programs  – Austin Community College C...
Module 3: Careers in Music• Participate in projects in industry-  appropriate roles  – Create a promotional plan for a com...
Module 4—Social Relevance andCommunity (PSA Video)
Module 4: Social Relevance andCommunity• Examine music in social change messaging• Identify key message for target audienc...
Module 4: Social Relevance andCommunity              Capstone Project       Public Service AnnouncementsLesson 1: Idea Gen...
MMC I• Pilot in 2012-13 school year• Offer training statewide in 2013
Lessons Learned continued• Work with tech staff in advance• Download, test, practice using software• Don’t forget the smal...
http://www.txartandmedia.org/
Technology & Software               • Computers               • Projector               • MP3 recorders               • Di...
Contact Information-TCTTexas Cultural Trusthttp://txculturaltrust.org/Amy Barbee, Executive Directorabarbee@txculturaltrus...
Contact Information-RFLResources for Learningwww.resourcesforlearning.netTracy LaughlinTracyL@resourcesforlearning.netChar...
http://www.txartandmedia.org/
Music and Media Communications
Music and Media Communications
Music and Media Communications
Music and Media Communications
Music and Media Communications
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Music and Media Communications

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  • TRACY Welcome participants. Introduce Texas Cultural Trust representatives. Let them introduce the trust and vision. 10:05
  • Tracy Introduce writers
  • Tracy In this session we are going to be up and about, moving around, and doing a lot of hands-on work with several of the lessons from the curriculum. We will have breaks, we will have lunch, and we will have fun. READ FROM SLIDE
  • Kay Let’s have a show of hands as to how many music educators, how many administrators, principals, and others. We’re going to be working together a lot in this session over the next 3 hours, so introductions are in order. Introduce yourself to your neighbor. Talk about why you are here and discuss these questions. (Elicit some responses.)
  • Kay This looks like a home study, but what if it were a classroom?
  • Kay
  • Kay QUICK SHOW OF HANDS
  • Charles Challenges for students
  • Charles Keeping kids in school is one of the major challenges faced by our school systems today. According to the Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA), Texas public schools lose one out of every 4 students. In a study funded by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation called The Silent Epidemic: Perspectives of High School Dropouts, “nearly half …(READ FROM SLIDE) In On the Frontlines of Schools: Perspectives of Teachers and Principals on the High School Dropout Problem, a study funded by the AT&T Foundation, 70% of teachers and 68% of principal… (READ FROM SLIDE) http://www.civicenterprises.net/pdfs/thesilentepidemic3-06.pdf http://www.att.com/Common/merger/files/pdf/Schools_Executive_Summary.pdf
  • Charles READ FROM SLIDE
  • Charles Do you agree with any of these statements? How could these three statements related?
  • Tracy A project of the Texas Cultural Trust, the Arts and Digital Media Series is a set of innovative course curricula in the fine arts based on a combined set of fine arts and technology standards, resulting in arts instruction that is rigorous and designed to specifically develop student’s media literacy, providing integrated relevant skills that will preparing them for the 21 st century workplace. READ FROM SLIDE TO DESCRIBE THE STATUS OF DEVELOPMENT
  • Tracy We developed Essential Knowledge and skills for these series of courses that integrate the fine arts TEKS, the technology applications TEKS, the state’s College and Career Readiness standards, and 21 st Century skills. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for Fine Arts – Section 117 Perception Creative expression/ performance Historical/cultural Response/evaluation TEKS for Technology Applications Information acquisition Solving problems Communication CCRS Intellectual curiosity Reasoning Problem solving Academic behavior Work habits Academic integrity Reading, writing Research, use of data Technology
  • Tracy Designed by music teachers for music teachers. MMC provides access to music instruction for students who are not on traditional music trajectories Creates relevancy in the curriculum Teaches key workforce skills that help students communicate and succeed Provides opportunities to integrate other areas of the curriculum such as mathematics, social studies, English/language arts, and science. A year-long course that provides instructional modules in four thematic units that span 32 weeks and cover approximately 12 projects Final unit allows time for capstone project Lessons in each module provide scaffolding of skills for introduction to both foundational music instruction and digital media literacy Resources and links to online tools Assessment rubrics for each project
  • Tracy Course: Music and Media Communications PEIMS Code: N1170160 Abbreviation: MUMECOD Grade Level: 9-12 Credits: 1.0 (state elective) Year long course.
  • Tracy MMC 1 is designed to provide access to rigorous and relevant instruction in music and media-based skills for those students entering high school who may not have an extensive background in music. Students will explore and discover their own connections to music and their musicality using technology and media-based resources for listening, recording, sharing, composing, and making music. Students will also analyze the presence of music in contemporary contexts and media, review fundamental musical concepts, and be introduced to skills and knowledge required for some music-related professions both performance, technical, and media-related.
  • Tracy MMC Essential Knowledge and Skills are READ FROM SLIDE
  • Tracy The curriculum is based on the 7E model, which is an extension of 5E model, developed by Roger Bybee and team of educators at the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study. Many districts already use related 5E Model, so this design simplifies implementation for those teachers. Many of you are probably familiar with the 7e’s but for those that aren’t, NEXT SLIDE
  • Tracy The first handout in your packet provides a description/explanation of each of the 7 e’s Elicit -Accessing and ascertaining prior knowledge and understanding -Teacher can frame “What do you think” questions. Engage -Generate enthusiasm and stimulate interest and thinking -Teacher can surprise students, get students thinking, or raise questions through compelling demonstrations or presentations. Explore -Provide opportunities to observe, record data, design experiments, interpret results, organize findings -Teacher can frame questions, suggest approaches, provide feedback and assess understanding. Explain -Introduce models, laws, theories -Teacher can guide students toward generalizations and provide terminology and questions that help students explain their explorations. Elaborate -Provide opportunity to apply knowledge to new domains -Teacher can introduce new variables and pose new questions/scenarios in which students practice transfer of knowledge. Evaluate -Provide formative and summative assessment opportunities, including self-reflection -Teacher can conduct ongoing assessment of student learning through all phases. Extend -Provide additional challenges that allow students to apply knowledge -Teachers can provide new contexts for application of knowledge that allow students to go one step further.
  • Charles (They can use the handout to jot down ideas in pairs for what an activity aligned with each of the 7es might look like, or after you do first one, they all don’t have to do all 7 e’s, you can assign different groups different Es to work on) Lets do a little brainstorming to address the 7e’s in a lesson about Pitch, Chords, and Rhythm. With the person next to you, come up with an elicit activity…. (Ask for some examples, then move on) SOME IDEAS BELOW IF IT FALLS FLAT Elicit Ask students what the following terms refer to (pitch, chord, rhythm) PRIOR KNOWLEDGE (Ask participants to anticipate what students might answer) Engage Teachers plays some sounds (different in pitch, chords, rhythms) and ask students to call out the first words they think of (not just adjectives, could be nouns or verbs, emotions, colors, etc.) Explore IS WHERE YOU PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS TO OBSERVE DATA, EXPERIMENT THEMSELVES, ANALYZE AND INTERPRET “FINDINGS”—ASK PARTICIPANTS TO COME UP WITH SOME EXPLORE ACTIVITIES Options: --Play a variety of rhythms and chords, chord progressions, making slight changes (add a flat or sharp, change tempo and dynamics) and ask students how emotional overtone changes. --Play a variety of sounds and have students rate sounds on an emotional continuum from one to 10—happy to sad/excited to calm and then explain why one is a 1 and one is a 10, invite students to compare --Students play with virtual keyboards themselves to experiment with sounds that they relate with key emotions, recording which notes sound happier/sadder and what patterns emerge, lower pitched sounds sound SAD/CALM/SERIOUS. # notes sound XXXX, Explain Give them language to describe Diminished Augmented Major Minor Simple Complex Crescendo Decrescendo Play the first portion of this (until he uses the word “damn”—watch out for this). Students don’t have to totally understand it, they just have to see it and take it in http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KR_TK6ybetw Elaborate Students read an article entitled: Why music makes you feel? In it, a study talks about how different music can color how a person views a visual image. Students can recreate the experiment discussed in the artile using some of the chords, pitches, rhythms that the associate with certain emotional overtones and see if the sound changes a veiwers perception of the image Evaluate: Ask students to articulate musical components and patterns that make them feel one way or another (minor chords make you feel x; slow rhythms make you feel x; low pitched, slow rhythms make you feel calm, etc.) Extend: ASK PARTICIPANTS TO THINK OF SOME EXTENSIONS
  • Charles These are the Course values, which drive instruction. Activities in the lessons are designed to provide opportunities for students to: Work as a team and in various roles Think conceptually Reflect and evaluate Offer feedback and criticism Create meaningful projects of value to them and their communities
  • Kay Activity. Give the conversation two minutes. Who has never seen a 78? (Hold one up) I’ll show it around! Does anyone listen to local radio except for news? How many read on a “reader”? How many LISTEN to books? How many of you remember when “ripped” meant you tore your clothing?
  • KAY MMC I is based on the Music TEKS. It is not a technology course, it is a music course in which technology is the instrument.
  • Kay Even without previous musical training, all students have deep connections to and interests in music. The goals of this module are to engage students through connections to their own musical interests, build student skill in listening and perception, and enhance student knowledge and appreciation of music as a cultural and historical influence. Aural Culture and Identity guides students in reflecting on the prevalence of music in their daily lives and its role in our culture. Lessons draw on students’ prior exposure to music. In the first Module, students are asked to listen in ways that they have not ever listened before. They begin by listening to the music all around them: the radio, the television, soundtracks at movies, elevator music, ringtones, etc. Students then have the opportunity to research Dick Clark’s American Bandstand and the roots of the Billboard system of ranking and rating music. Copyright rules are important at this point as many students pirate music and movies without a conscious thought as to who might be “hurt” in the process. Finally, students listen to music through history to find what they like about genres they may have never heard before and to put their musical knowledge in context.
  • Kay Lessons in the module introduce students to a variety of musical genres, styles, and components. Students also place their own musical experiences and tastes in context through a brief musical history overview that spans traditional periods and musical institutions but also includes a look at the very recent technological developments that are responsible for the rapidly changing music industry of today. At the outset of the module, students are introduced to foundational musical concepts and are given the knowledge and vocabulary to describe and analyze musical works. Technology-focused activities introduced during this module include standard presentation software, Internet research and access to music archives, blogging, and an introduction to music editing software. Students also begin investigation of intellectual property issues.
  • Kay Discuss instructional focus/objective of each lesson (summarize lesson descriptions) Lesson 1 focuses on the music that students encounter in everyday life. Since no prior musical coursework is required for student enrollment in Music and Media Communications I, this opening lesson gives students an experiential introduction to the elements of music. learn basic music concepts and vocabulary describing the elements of music  rhythm, form, melody, timbre, dynamics, texture, and harmony; investigate examples of a variety of musical genres to explore similarities and differences; practice critical listening skills; create a blog to communicate and reflect on course activities; and examine how the elements of music can elicit emotional or perceptual responses in the listener In Lesson 2, students conduct online research on music industry developments and institutions; describe music industry developments that capture (or shape) musical trends and tastes; compare and contrast similarities and differences in contemporary musical genres; conduct research on contemporary musicians and their songs; use audio-editing and recording software to compile a musical montage; prepare a brief presentation using Power Point or video applications highlighting an artist and popular song; research and prepare a presentation on a major 20 th century music industry development; and document lesson reflections using media-based communication tools In Lesson 3, students research various eras of music history through online research and access to digital archives; identify major composers and musical developments of each era of music history; begin an introduction to music copyright and intellectual property issues; prepare a brief presentation using PowerPoint and audio and video applications; create questions or concepts to use in evaluating the quality of student presentations; and synthesize presentations into an integrated timeline of musical history
  • Kay
  • KAY First, we need a common vocabulary. This helps them “speak the language of music” and will help them understand the research they do in the modules ahead. Once they have learned the vocabulary (played a few games, made some note cards) they will study a tutorial on blogging. Blogging will be their “writing across the curriculum” and an opportunity to share their thoughts for the teacher to use as a formative grade. Everyday we hear many sounds: alarm, ringtones on phones, tv theme songs, the band practicing at school, radio, elevator music. Students need to become cognizant of the sounds around them and the many different styles or “genres” of music. We will go on a musical scavenger hunt to listen to several different genres and place the information we discover on a handout that has the main vocabulary words on it. Let’s try this activity: Pass out Attachment 2 of Module one - Qualities
  • Kay
  • KAY Now that students have had the opportunity to listen to the “popular music” of the 20 th and 21 st century, they will get to hear what was popular during the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Modern time periods. This is a good opportunity to remind them that if this music was written in the 1500’s (by hand) and it’s still being sung, it must be really good! The lesson is set up as though they were on a magical time machine touring the different era’s. Hopefully, they’ll find a style they can relate to and enjoy!
  • CHARLES Digital music and everyday technology, from smartphones and mp3 players to free musical editing software, has dramatically expanded our ability to not only access music but to organize musical sounds and create musical products. Students explore opportunities to make digital music, allowing them to articulate musical intentions, practice musical decisionmaking, and create musical compositions. The goals of this module are to guide students in using technology as an instrument in creative expression and performance and to analyze and experience the use of music as a communication tool.
  • Charles They also investigate how music is used to convey feeling, emotions, and ideas analyzing musical messages and the storytelling potential of music from the most elemental units of music (key, pitch, and tempo) to complex compositions (songs, symphonies, and soundtracks). Students will also experiment with entry-level notation software to compose a piece of music or notate an existing musical work. Finally, students will research intellectual property issues and create a podcast summarizing their research. descriptions to provide overview of instructional focus in terms of skills/knowledge and technology
  • Charles In Lesson 1, students learn about analog and digital sound; describe differences in examples of analog and digital recordings; practice music vocabulary describing the elements of musical sound­— pitch, dynamics  (loudness or softness),  tone color (timbre) and duration; learn the fundamentals of digital music editing through use of software such as Audacity ; create a brief “found-sound” composition using editing software; and describe, justify, and analyze creative choices and products In Lesson 2, students will identify the emotive potential of the elements of music; experiment with modifying the elements of music to produce different emotive approaches; analyze media messages; analyze how music is used to communicate basic feelings, messages, and ideas in media products; continue use of Audacity music editing software to create a musical product that communicates a message; and explore the use of music in storytelling In Lesson 3, students, Look at the concepts of intervals, music notation, chord structure, and rhythm and meter using standard terminology; Interpret music symbols and terms related to dynamics, tempo, and articulation learn the basic elements of Finale Note Pad notation software; organize musical sounds to create a composition; analyze key compositional elements such as rhythm and keys; perform composition for their peers; use appropriate music vocabulary to critique their own and each other’s work In Lesson 4, students reflect on the impact of technology on music and how communities distribute and share music; research the effects of filesharing on the music industry; explore the uses of the podcast as a communication tool; compare and contrast the cultural role and influence of music across cultures; plan and prepare a podcast on the role of music in society; review intellectual property issues in using music in podcasts; use knowledge of composition or musical editing to create a short theme song for podcast projects; and share podcasts through blogs or other online distribution channels
  • Charles
  • CHARLES
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  • Charles Bookmark url for the video?
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  • Kay Music is most often created, performed, and enjoyed as the result of the collaborative effort of many people. This module looks at the avocations and vocations in music and the myriad “players” who are “instrumental” in the making and distribution of the final product. Students will explore opportunities in the broad areas of community-based arts, performance/management, production and technical professions, and new media. The goals of this module are to gain practical knowledge about the array of opportunities in the music and entertainment industries and the skills, knowledge, and experience required for work in these careers; to practice and apply musical skills learned throughout the course; and to experience the collaborative nature of work in the arts.
  • Kay Students will independently research a variety of specific music careers in music performing/writing, music business jobs, the recording and record industry, and the game industry. Research will include a look at necessary skills, salaries, employment and advancement opportunities, and education and training. Students will also work in collaborative teams to create musical products relevant to the area of study working in industry-appropriate roles. Virtual field trips and guest speakers could be incorporated into this module.
  • Kay In Lesson 1, students will research the range of non-professional arts opportunities available in their community; describe the different types of music avocations; identify the variety of skills and roles required for the production of a community musical event; and create a promotional plan for a musical event. In Lesson 2, students research music careers in performance/management; explore business and management aspects of music careers; explore technologies used in these career fields; plan, promote, organize, and conduct a school-based concert. In Lesson 3, students will explore the changing landscape of music technology; research the various careers, skills, and educational requirements associated with sound recording; analyze the importance of 21 st Century Learning and Innovation skills; practice intermediate audio editing and mixing skills; record and mix a recording of a live performance; and evaluate the quality of mixed audio clips. In Lesson 4, students will research a range of music-related careers in media; explore technologies used in these career fields; identify required skills and knowledge and academic and vocational pathways for specific careers; and experiment with creating music for video games and applications.
  • Kay Each lesson will involve a range of introductory activities that elicit prior knowledge and explore opportunities in a career field. This activity is in the careers in performance and management lesson Pass out Attachment 1 3-3 “Name my Game”. After 10 minutes post the answers.
  • How did you do?
  • KAY In most of the lessons in this module, students will use resources such as the Careers in Music website to research the range of jobs available and the specific skills sets that are needed, salary expectations, and the education requirements. Students will also research Texas college certificate or degree programs related to the career field. (CLICK ON WEBSITES AND DEMONSTRATE WHAT INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE THERE)
  • Kay Finally, as a culminating project for each lesson, students will participate in a project related to the industry. For example, They will … READ FROM SLIDE
  • Tracy In this module, students will research, design, and implement a public service announcement (PSA) aligned with a school or community campaign with a social message. The goals of this module are to synthesize knowledge and skills gained through the course; practice and refine key 21 st century skills such as leadership, creative collaboration, and reflection; engage with audiences; and evaluate impact of projects. GE
  • Tracy The Capstone lesson still uses the 7e framework and provides some structure to help the teacher guide the student group work on this long-term project. Students will first study the role of music in messaging to affect social change. Students will then engage in creative team processes to brainstorm, plan, and implement project ideas for a public service announcement. As part of the process, they will assemble or compose musical and audio components of the PSA to specifically target their assigned audience and will conduct focus groups to test the effectiveness of the musical elements of their PSAs with that audience. The goal will be to integrate music and audio components with video to communicate the critical message of the campaign. Final PSA products will be distributed or presented as appropriate in school or community contexts. Students will also implement formal data collection strategies to evaluate audience responses and accomplishment of project objectives.
  • Tracy The Capstone lesson still uses the 7e framework and provides some structure to help the teacher guide the student group work on this long-term project.
  • Tracy For example, if a school or district has an anti bullying campaign, students will create a Public Service Announcement about the campaign targeting an assigned audience. They will create, integrate, and edit both the video and audio components for the PSA. Targeted audiences will include elementary aged children, middle school students, high school students, school/district staff, and the broader community. You would expect the messaging around the campaigns targeting these different audiences to take different approaches. What might work for high school students would be inappropriate for elementary students. The audio and video components of student projects should be appropriate for the target audiences, demonstrating student’s knowledge of how music can be used in media messaging to achieve certain goals.
  • Tracy
  • Tracy When we piloted the first course in the series, Art and Media Communications 1, we also conducted a formative evaluation of the field test to gather data to inform continued development and improvement of the curriculum and implementation guidelines and to shape the development of the additional courses in the series of which music was next in line. Some key findings from the evaluation were as follows: The course provides meaningful learning opportunities for students and a solid introduction to the full spectrum of 21 st century skills. The curriculum guides students to examine a host of personal, social, and cultural big ideas and to practice higher order thinking and collaboration skills as well as art-related hand skills and technical skills. It also introduces career paths in marketing, communications, and digital media and a range of contemporary workplace skills.   Teachers participating in the pilot benefitted from teaching this course. Despite a big learning curve, teachers reported that they gained new skills and understanding of their own and other disciplines and were exposed to new pedagogical techniques that will change their teaching practice. Teachers gained important practical experience leading project-based instruction, orienting instruction to smaller, collaborative groups, and shifting from teacher-directed to student-directed learning.   Students were engaged and interested in the course. The creative focus, the opportunity to use a range of technologies, and the practical skills gained were of great value to student participants. Students were pleased and surprised at the extent of what they were able to do, and their self-esteem was particularly bolstered when they created meaningful artworks that were recognized by others.   Students reported improved communications skills and had highly positive reactions to the framework of collaboration built into the curriculum. The collaborative nature of course activities was highly appreciated by students. All participants reported that student/student and student/teacher interactions were positive and helpful and focused on the work. High levels of communication and teamwork were cited by students as a key benefit of the course.   Challenges identifying specific teacher technology training and preparation time needs need for additional support/training to master course-related pedagogical techniques teacher support in classroom management/strategies for working with at-risk students school practices, such as regularly pulling students out of electives for tutoring, and enrollment realities that impact course fidelity
  • Tracy Some of the practical considerations we gleaned from the pilot and evaluation included the following. --get with district folks in advance for policy for accessing web resources and posting content internally and externally --work with technology staff to download software on computers and test it in advance --work through all tutorials, and lessons in advance technology-based steps (such as downloading saving files) --create weblists --review general social media practices an cyberbulling resources to prepare in advance guidelines for students in using/commenting on blogs, etc., including --group work, collaborative approaches
  • A draft version of the curriculum is posted at this website. Feel free to access the curriculum. A revised version, complete with a lesson assessment rubric, will up late in the summer. After the pilot in the 2012-13 school year, we will make revisions, and the final version will be available at no cost to educators anywhere.
  • Tracy What will you need to teach the course: You’ll need access to computers some or most of the time; teachers can adapt lesson activities to align with access needs. However, infrequent access would not be productive. Hardware that is needed Computers (1 for every 3 students; with occasional individual access in library etc.) Most computer activities are designed for small groups. Computer speakers Edirol/MP3 recorders or cellphones Projector Digital Cameras SD card/reader for digital video recorders USB sticks  Internet Access   Software heir choice of blogging/class website software (listed in first lesson) PowerPoint Zamzar Audacity Finale Note Pad Imovie/Movie Maker  
  • Transcript of "Music and Media Communications"

    1. 1. PresentersCharles AguillonAssociate Principal for Teaching & LearningGeorgetown East View HS, Georgetown ISDKay PaytonChoral DirectorHendrickson HS, Pflugerville ISDTracy LaughlinSenior Project ManagerResources for Learning
    2. 2. Agenda10:00-10:30 Introduction and Background10:30-10:50 7E Model10:50-11:05 Break11:05-11:35 Module 1—Aural Culture and Identity11:35-12:05 Module 2—Imagination and Ideas 12:05-1:00 Lunch 1:00-1:15 Module 3—Careers in Music 1:15-1:30 Module 4—Social Relevance and Community 1:30-2:00 Lessons Learned, Wrap Up, Questions
    3. 3. What are your initial thoughts whenyou think of music andtechnology?Would you describe yourself as“tech savvy”?
    4. 4. When you see this music lab, doesit make you want to:A: ScreamB. LaughC. Learn more
    5. 5. How many of you are a little anxiouswhen you think of teaching music andtechnology?How many of you are anxious when youthink of the future of music education?How many of you are anxious when youthink about what the future may hold foryour students?
    6. 6. Students Face Big Challenges• Global competition for skilled workers—a war for “talent”• Jobs in vertical markets that don’t exist yet• A growing service economy and knowledge work• An increased need for entrepreneurial skills
    7. 7. Schools Face Big Challenges“Nearly half (47%) of former studentssurveyed said a major factor in theirdecision to drop out was that classes werenot interesting.”“70% of teachers and 68% of principals feltconnecting classroom learning to real-worldexperiences would help a lot in reducing thenumber of dropouts.”
    8. 8. Fine Arts Educators Face Big Challenges• Budget cuts• Students overwhelmed or disengaged• Lack of parent and community involvement• Educating others on your campus as to the value of what you do• Connecting to your colleagues & sharing resources
    9. 9. We are losing our students to boredomand lack of relevance.The arts can provide solutions toaddress many of the challenges facedby schools today.New technologies are changing theway we do everything.
    10. 10. Arts and Digital Media Series• Designed to teach 21st century workforce skills in the creative media arts• 2009-12 Art and Media Communications I and II• 2011-13 Music and Media Communications I• 2012-14 Theatre, Dance
    11. 11. Texas Policy Support: StandardsTexas EssentialKnowledge andSkills for Fine ArtsTexas EssentialKnowledge andSkills forTechnologyApplicationsTexas College andCareer ReadinessStandards
    12. 12. Music and Media Communications Creates relevancy Teaches vital workforce skills Provides integration opportunities
    13. 13. TEA-Approved Innovative Course• Course pilot: 2012-2013 school year• PEIMS Code: N1170160• Abbreviation: MUMECOM• State elective credit (1.0)• Grades 9-12
    14. 14. Music and Media Communications• Open to students not participating in traditional music classes/groups• Explores student interests and connections to music• Uses technology applications for listening, sharing, recording, composing, making music• Analyzes music in contemporary contexts/media• Introduces music-related professions
    15. 15. Music and Media Communications Essential Knowledge and Skills 1.) Perception & Information Acquisition 2.) Creative Expression & Communication 3.) Historical/Cultural Studies 4.) Response, Evaluation, & Media Literacy
    16. 16. 7E Lesson Framework
    17. 17. 7E FrameworkElicit—Access prior knowledgeEngage—Stimulate interest/thinkingExplore—Observe, experiment, interpretExplain—Introduce models, vocab, rules, theoriesElaborate—Apply knowledge to new domainsEvaluate—Assess learning (formative/summative)Extend—Provide new challenges for application
    18. 18. 7E Example: Pitch, Chords, Rhythm Elicit Engage Explore Explain Elaborate Evaluate Extend
    19. 19. The Times Are A Changin’How has access to music changed for the typical consumer over the last several decades?At your tables discuss the following:• When did you last see a 78, 45, 33 1/3, 8 track?• Did you listen to your radio on the way to this conference? Tuning in local or Sirrius/XM?• Do you listen to music on an iPod/iPad?• Is the music you listen to “ripped” or downloaded?
    20. 20. A different approach to technology integration…
    21. 21. Module 1: Aural Culture and Identity
    22. 22. Module 1: Aural Culture andIdentity• Foundational musical concepts/vocab• Musical genres, styles, components• Music history overview• Music and media industry developments• Copyright issues• Basic presentation, online research, blogging
    23. 23. Module 1Lesson 1—Music of My Life, Part 1Lesson 2—Music of My Life, Part 2Lesson 3—Creating a Musical Timeline
    24. 24. Module 1: Music of My Life-Part 1• Musical vocabulary• What do we hear in our everyday life?• How do we compare/contrast what we hear?
    25. 25. Module 1: Music of My Life-Part 1• Break into groups of 3-4• Look at your assigned URLs and complete the worksheet.• Marching Band: http://listeninglab.stantons.com/marching-band/• Choral Music: www.carlfischer.com/partbypart/brilee/3partmxd.html• Symphony Concert: www.myspace.com/chicagosymphony, http://www.radiosymphony.com/• Broadway Music: http://www.mtishows.com/find_a_show.asp• Be prepared to discuss your findings!
    26. 26. Module 1: Music of My Life-Part 2• Billboard Charts• How did popular music become popular?• Compare and contrast genres• What was popular on my birthday?• Soundtrack of my life• http://www.billboard.com/soyl/wizard#/soyl/edit?e=&t=Got %20Married&d=1976-8-21/#intro
    27. 27. Module 1: Musical Timelines• Musical timeline with list of composers from each of the main historical periods• Groups are assigned a genre and listen to music they choose from a list of classical music websites.• Each group makes a presentation on their genre.
    28. 28. Module 2: Imagination and Ideas
    29. 29. Module 2: Imagination and Ideas• Examine emotional components of music• Analyze music in media• Organize and create musical phrases• Experiment with notation/composition• Investigate intellectual property concerns• Research the role of music across cultures• Use editing/notation software, podcasts
    30. 30. Module 2: Imagination and IdeasLesson 1: The Possibilities of Digital SoundLesson 2: Music and the MessageLesson 3: Capture Your IdeasLesson 4: Music and Society
    31. 31. Module 2: Possibilities of Digital SoundDigitize Me! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0FzjETQsQc•Bring this lesson to their world!•Engage students in dialogue about theirdevices, etc.•Quick survey: How many digital devices do youhave in your home? 2, 3,.........•If we place that much emphasis on digitaldevices, why do we try to stifle what studentsuse at school?
    32. 32. Module 2: Possibilities of Digital Sound• The first lesson in this module encourages students to explore techniques to create new versions of digital music.• Students also listen critically to make connections between various music files and decide how they might aurally fit together.• This next activity demonstrates what type of product students will create using and editing sound clips using the free software “Audacity.”• How many of you are familiar with “Audacity?”• What do you think of the learning curve?
    33. 33. Module 2: Possibilities of Digital Sound• Let’s take a brief look at Audacity http://audacity.sourceforge.net/
    34. 34. Module 2: Music and the Message• This lesson focuses on having students analyze music and how it conveys different types of messages.• You have a handout titled: KEY QUESTIONS TO ASK WHEN ANALYZING MEDIA MESSAGES• Let’s look at the video and go through the handout http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLRhsxJ8_GE
    35. 35. Module 2: Capture Your IdeasLesson 3: • Students begin looking at some basic notation concepts • Projects have students creating compositions using Finale NotePad • How many of you have used Finale NotePad? http://www.finalemusic.com/notepad/default.aspx
    36. 36. Module 2: Capture Your Ideas• Students willexplore byimporting thefamiliar “Ode to Joy”theme• There is a“quick start” tutorial to getstudents started!
    37. 37. Module 2: Capture Your IdeasACTIVITY:•If you have a computer, download FinaleNotePad and let’s see how quick it is forstudents to explore!OR•Watch me demonstrate!
    38. 38. Module 2: Music and Society • Reflect on the impact of technology on music and how communities distribute and share music • Explore the uses of the podcast as a communication tool • Compare and contrast the cultural role and influence of music across cultures • Use knowledge of composition or musical editing to create a short theme song for podcast projects • Share podcasts through blogs or other online distribution channels
    39. 39. Module 3: Careers in Music—Collaboration and Communication
    40. 40. Module 3: Careers in Music• Performance/writing, business/management, recording/technical, gaming/new media• Research opportunities, skills, education• Work in industry-appropriate roles to create collaborative products• Virtual field trips/guest speakers
    41. 41. Module 3: Careers in MusicLesson 1: Music AvocationsLesson 2: Performance and ManagementLesson 3: Technical ProfessionsLesson 4: New Media
    42. 42. Module 3: Sample ActivityHow many artists can you connect totheir accomplishments?
    43. 43. H 1. Dolly PartonD 2. Lionel RitchieA 3. Leonard BernsteinJ 4. Ricky SkaggsO 5. Christina PerriK 6. John WilliamsI 7. Beverly SillsN 8. Eric WhitacreC 9. Ryan SeacrestG 10. Stephen Curtis ChapmanB 11. Benny GoodmanF 12. Arthur FiedlerL 13. Luther VandrossE 14. Billie HolidayM 15. Hans Zimmer
    44. 44. Module 3: Careers in Music• Careers in Music website www.careersinmusic.com• Degree programs – Austin Community College Commercial Music Management Program http://www.austincc.edu/cmusic/ – Texas State University Sound Recording Technology Program http://www.txstate.edu/music/srt/about/overview.html
    45. 45. Module 3: Careers in Music• Participate in projects in industry- appropriate roles – Create a promotional plan for a community arts event – Produce a concert at school – Record a live performance and mix audio clips – Create a proposal for a video game with background or theme music
    46. 46. Module 4—Social Relevance andCommunity (PSA Video)
    47. 47. Module 4: Social Relevance andCommunity• Examine music in social change messaging• Identify key message for target audience• Develop audio/video components of PSA• Identify/compose music for target audience• Present and collect data on impact
    48. 48. Module 4: Social Relevance andCommunity Capstone Project Public Service AnnouncementsLesson 1: Idea Generation and PlanningLesson 2: ProductionLesson 3: Presentation and Evaluation
    49. 49. MMC I• Pilot in 2012-13 school year• Offer training statewide in 2013
    50. 50. Lessons Learned continued• Work with tech staff in advance• Download, test, practice using software• Don’t forget the small stuff—where to save files• Create weblists in advance• Review best practices in social media• Don’t be afraid of loud and messy group work
    51. 51. http://www.txartandmedia.org/
    52. 52. Technology & Software • Computers • Projector • MP3 recorders • Digital cameras • Internet connection • Blogging software •Audacity • Finale Note Pad •imovie/Movie Maker
    53. 53. Contact Information-TCTTexas Cultural Trusthttp://txculturaltrust.org/Amy Barbee, Executive Directorabarbee@txculturaltrust.orgCaroline Hammond, Project Managerchammond@txculturaltrust.org
    54. 54. Contact Information-RFLResources for Learningwww.resourcesforlearning.netTracy LaughlinTracyL@resourcesforlearning.netCharles Aguilloncharles.aguillon@gmail.comKay Paytonutmom@austin.rr.com
    55. 55. http://www.txartandmedia.org/
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