2040 RTP Community Advisory Committee/Core Technical Team #2
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2040 RTP Community Advisory Committee/Core Technical Team #2

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Presentation made October 22nd and 23rd, 2012, to the 2040 Regional Transportation Plan's Community Advisory Committee and Core Technical Team.

Presentation made October 22nd and 23rd, 2012, to the 2040 Regional Transportation Plan's Community Advisory Committee and Core Technical Team.

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  • Developed set of goals/objectives based on extensive public outreach conducted summer 2012.We heard a lot about transportation needs, challenges, frustrations, opportunities.Much of the time, needs were presented from two rather distinct perspectives; one perspective driven by a broad set of stakeholders approaching the 2040 RTP from a more local, community-oriented perspective (focused on advancing livability, quality of life principles, and healhty, multimodal travel options for broad set of users), and the other from stakeholders focused on more systems-level, regional investments (focused on reducing congestion, improving mobility for people and goods … e.g., the “bypass” crowd) to ensure region is well-positioned and competitive from economic standpoint.Difference in perspectives is not unique to the plan process. TPO has developed a performance-framework to help strike the right balance, in terms of addressing needs of both (community/regional). Presented here as the “community to region” transect which is intended to help illustrate the transition in perspectives related to transportation needs as you move from community scale up to regional scale. This “community to region” approach is the foundation for our 2040 RTP performance framework and has been used to guide development of goals and objectives.
  • Developed set of goals/objectives based on extensive public outreach conducted summer 2012.We heard a lot about transportation needs, challenges, frustrations, opportunities.Much of the time, needs were presented from two rather distinct perspectives; one perspective driven by a broad set of stakeholders approaching the 2040 RTP from a more local, community-oriented perspective (focused on advancing livability, quality of life principles, and healhty, multimodal travel options for broad set of users), and the other from stakeholders focused on more systems-level, regional investments (focused on reducing congestion, improving mobility for people and goods … e.g., the “bypass” crowd) to ensure region is well-positioned and competitive from economic standpoint.Difference in perspectives is not unique to the plan process. TPO has developed a performance-framework to help strike the right balance, in terms of addressing needs of both (community/regional). Presented here as the “community to region” transect which is intended to help illustrate the transition in perspectives related to transportation needs as you move from community scale up to regional scale. This “community to region” approach is the foundation for our 2040 RTP performance framework and has been used to guide development of goals and objectives.
  • Historically this was the primary focus of the LRTP processExplain E+C
  • Significant portion of overall funds available
  • Significant portion of overall funds available
  • (you will see this contrasts later with just over $5 based on regional research)

2040 RTP Community Advisory Committee/Core Technical Team #2 2040 RTP Community Advisory Committee/Core Technical Team #2 Presentation Transcript

  • 2040 Regional Transportation PlanCommunity Advisory CommitteeMeetingOctober 23, 2012 Chattanooga-Hamilton County/N. GA Transportation Planning Organization
  • 2040 Regional Transportation PlanCore Technical TeamMeetingOctober 23, 2012 Chattanooga-Hamilton County/N. GA Transportation Planning Organization
  • Agenda• Overview• Results of Public Outreach Activities• Review of Goals & Objectives• Travel Demand Model Update• Needs Identification Exercise• Public Workshops• Next Steps
  • OverviewProgress to date
  • Public Outreach Schedule COMMUNITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE + CORE TECHNICAL TEAM Community leaders and technical experts comprise these two committees, whose input will help form plan goals and validate recommendations. Meeting #1: July 25-26, 2012 Meeting #3: January 2013 Status report to committees: Late August Meeting #4: Mid March 2013 Meeting #2: Mid October 2012 Status report to committees: April 2013 Status report to committees: Late November LEADERSHIP SYMPOSIUMS WORKSHOPS Large forum events where regional initiatives, Transit Aspirations: August 22, 2012 strategies, and integration are contemplated Visioning: Mid October 2012 by political and community leaders from throughout the region Priorities: January 2013 Visioning Event: August 23, 2012 Draft Fiscally Constrained Plan: Mid May 2013 Project Summit: Early December 2012 STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEWS PUBLIC MEETINGS One-on-one and small group interviews with Community Open House (kickoff): key community figures, agencies, service August 23, 2012 providers, and other relevant groups. Community Open House: Early August 21-24, 2012 December 2012 Mid October 2012 Final Plan Open House: October 2013
  • Questionnaire325 Questionnaires have been completed to date
  • Transit Aspiration Workshop• The “Chattanooga Way” • High Speed Rail to Atlanta• Multi-modal mobility • Connectivity
  • Open House32 people attended
  • Leadership SymposiumOver 80 people attended the event Mobility Chip Game
  • Leadership Symposium
  • Stakeholder Interviews2 stakeholder interviews completed during Augustevent period6 interviews scheduled this week, including economicdevelopment, quality of life, and service providers1 jurisdiction meeting with City of Soddy-Daisy
  • Defining Goals and ObjectivesFirst critical step in the processBased on outreach efforts summarized previously
  • Performance-Based Plan• TPO advancing previous performance-based planning efforts from 2035 RTP• Performance-based plan process: – Supports transparent decision-making in competitive funding environment – Provides context for plan development Quality Data and helps balance analysis across competing needs – Applies key metrics to track positive outcomes – Ensures investment decisions align with long-term goals – Allows MPO to manage expectations 13
  • Defining Goals and Objectives• First critical step in the process• Based on outreach efforts conducted summer 2012 – Community Advisory Committee and Core Technical Committee meetings – Regional leadership symposium – Transit visioning workshop – Public open house and public questionnaires – Stakeholder interviews 14
  • “Community to Region” Framework Region to Region Community to Region Within Community INVESTMENT NEEDS THAT SUPPORT: INVESTMENT NEEDS THAT SUPPORT: • Mobility and intermodal INVESTMENT NEEDS THAT improvements to ensure • Strategic, multimodal region is well connected SUPPORT: connections between within the state and the • Local, multimodal communities and regional nation connections and access to activity/economic centers • Support economic community resources to support economic competitiveness and • Advance livability and quality development advance overall economic of life principles development potential 15
  • Goals and Objectives Within Community Goal: BUILD AND MAINTAIN SAFE AND HEALTHY COMMUNITIES Objectives: • Support walkable and bicycle-friendly communities that promote safe, connections to community resources • Provide incentives for complete streets project design • Encourage investments anchored in integrated transportation and land use planning, that support desired community character • Improve safety through improved system operations, preventative maintenance, and ADA compliance • Prioritize investments in areas where local land use and development regulations support healthy, safe communities • Prioritize investment that improves multimodal access to existing or planned transit hubs or that fills gaps in existing multimodal system • Encourage connected street network 16
  • Goals and Objectives Community to Region Goal: CONNECT COMMUNITIES IN THE REGION BY PROVIDING MULTIMODAL TRAVEL OPTIONS TO ACTIVITY AND ECONOMIC CENTERS Objectives: • Preserve, maintain and improve existing infrastructure before adding new capacity • Provide incentives for complete streets project design • Encourage corridor improvements anchored in integrated transportation and land use planning, that support desired community character • Improve mobility and support economic development by providing expanded set of travel options, with emphasis on public transit • Improve travel time reliability through improved system operations • Incentive corridor protection plans 17
  • Goals and Objectives Region to Region Goal: GROW ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY THROUGH STRATEGIC INVESTMENT IN CRITICAL REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE Objectives: • Preserve, maintain and improve existing infrastructure before adding new capacity • Support continued economic growth of the region by improving intermodal connections that reduce delay for both people and goods • Reduce delay on critical regional thoroughfares with minimal impact to community, historic and environmental resources • Improve the efficiency and reliability of freight, cargo and goods movement by reducing delay on corridors critical to freight movement • Improve travel time reliability through improved system operations 18
  • Performance Framework Outcomes Region to Region Community to Region Within Community • Enable balanced consideration of investment needs across three geographic scales • Infuse context into the project evaluation process to better match solutions to needs • Provide flexible approach to project evaluation to support livability considerations at community level without impeding mobility and economic considerations at regional level 19
  • Identifying Future Needs• Addressing congestion• Preservation of existing system• Assuring safety and security• Active transportation: pedestrian and bicycle mobility; complete streets; health• Transit alternatives• Climate resilience 20
  • Needs: Congestion• Air quality 2010 2040 % Growth• Safety impacts Population 445,000 560,000 26%• Cost of congestion• Competitiveness Future Year Congested Highways• Quality of life• Future year demand on E&C network – Travel demand model – Congested corridors – Hotspots – Managing operations 21
  • Travel Demand ModelingPurpose • To understand future transportation demand • To test transportation scenarios • Inputs to air quality analysis
  • Travel Demand ModelingModel Features • Standard 4-Step Model • Time of Day • Mode Choice • Truck Model • Vehicle Availability • High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes
  • Travel Demand ModelingData Inputs • Land Use • Travel Characteristics • Roadway and Transit Characteristics
  • Travel Demand ModelingModel Operation • Trip Generation • Trip Distribution • Mode Choice • Assignment
  • Travel Demand ModelingSchedule • Base Year • Model Input – approved September 11 • Trip Behavior – approved October 15 • Trip Assignment – draft for review October 25 • Calibration and Validation – draft October 25
  • Travel Demand ModelingSchedule • Future Year – draft October 31 • Future Year on Existing Network • Future Year on Existing and Committed Network • Future Year on Major Route Plan • Model Interface – draft October 31 • Model Training – Mid-December
  • Needs: CongestionTransportation Systems Management and Operations (TSM&O) includes:• Traffic Incident Management • Work Zone Traffic• Travel Information Services Management (for roadways and for • Roadway Weather transit) Information• Freeway Management • Electronic Payment (for• Automatic Vehicle Location transit, parking, tolling) for Transit • Freight Management (ports• Traffic Signal Coordination and transfer areas) Applied individually or in combination 28
  • Needs: Congestion Why Is TSM&O Important? To take back as much of the road as we can ! TSM&O Weather Work Zones Incidents Recurring congestion 29
  • Needs: System Preservation• Focus of MAP-21• Impact to National competitiveness – 1 in 4 bridges deficient (2009) – Wilcox Tunnel (1931) – Chickamauga Lock (1940) Pavement Analysis Bridge Analysis 3% 9% Not Deficient Good 19% 18% Functionally Obsolete Fair Poor Structurally Deficient 73% 78% 30
  • Needs: System Preservation 31
  • Needs: System Preservation• Data sources: – National Bridge Inventory (FHWA) – State (TN, GA), County and Municipal departments – National Transit Database (FTA)• Develop costs to address deficiencies 32
  • Needs: Safety and Security• Traffic crashes leading cause of death 5-34yo 450 80• 55 deaths; 330 injuries 71 400 62 70 58 56 350 60 annually in region 300 250 47 44 49 50 40• $1,700 per person 200 150 30 100 20 50 10 404 386 366 319 261 252 332 0 0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Serious Injuries Fatalities 33
  • Needs: Safety and Security• Emphasis areas: – Roadway departure Roadway Departure 33.4% Aggressive 33.3% – Aggressive driving Intersection Seat Belt Use 25.2% 32.6% – Intersection crashes Young Drivers (15-24) Motorcycles* 12.5% 19.1% Alcohol Impaired 12.3% – Seat belt use Older Drivers (65+) Heavy Trucks 8.7% 3.0% – Young drivers Pedestrian* Work Zone** 1.3% 0.5% Pedacylists/Bicyclists* 0.2% 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 35.0% 40.0% 34
  • Needs: Active Transportation• Human-power replaced by automobile and other powered modes• Resultant decline in national health – Childhood obesity – Cost to families• Lack of suitable facilities – Topographic, geographic challenges – Average home 1.6 miles from a facility→ Complete streets 35
  • Needs: Active Transportation• Where are the greatest needs?• What facilities are needed? 36
  • Needs: Active Transportation• Pedestrian trips – Short-distance focus – Land use pattern – Generators – Barriers – Topography 37
  • Needs: Active Transportation• Bicycle trips – Longer distance – Generators – Road and traffic conditions – Bicycle level of service 38
  • Needs: Active Transportation 39
  • Needs: Transit Alternatives• Not served by auto travel: – Tourist market – Aging population – Youth less inclined to drive – Zero-car households Investment Job Creation• Jobs and economic Every $1 billion invested in Creates and supports an transit capital and operations average of 36,000 jobs development• Fuel cost and oil dependence• Environment and air quality Source: American Public Transportation Association 40
  • Transit Benefits: Economy Investment Economic Return For every $1 invested in $4 is generated in economic public transportation returns Source: American Public Transportation Association 41
  • Transit Benefits: Quality of Life Transit Use Annual Savings Americans living in areas 796 million hours in travel time served by public + 4,400 fewer miles driven transportation 42 Source: Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) Report on Congestion and American Public Transportation Association
  • Transit Benefits: Energy Transit Use Savings In 2011, Americans took 4.2 billion gallons of gasoline 10.4 billion trips per year on public transportation + 900,000 automobile fill-ups every day 43 Source: American Public Transportation Association
  • Transit Benefits: Environment Mode Shift Savings 20 mile roundtrip commute Decrease CO2 air pollutant emissions by 4,800 pounds per year = 10% less carbon footprint in a two-car household from driving to transit 44 Source: American Public Transportation Association
  • Needs: Transit Alternatives• What’s in our future? – Continued growth in suburban residential and employment – Aging population – Airport growth focus – High Speed Rail – Limited highway expansion – Fuel costs and air quality impacts – Impact of new technologies 45
  • Needs: Transit Alternatives• Vision for Transit – Electric vehicle technology – Connect downtown, airport, Enterprise S• Strategies – Collaboration & Leadership – Private sector; education partners – Technology – Integration with land use – Service levels by area – Funding 46
  • Needs: Transit Alternatives 47
  • Needs: Climate Resilience• September Climate Adaptation Workshop• Increasing frequency: – Extreme precipitation – Extreme temperature• Potential Climate Impacts: – Flooding, erosion, road closures – Landslides and other earthwork failures – Pavement cracking and rutting – Bridges – Scour critical and expansion – Airport take off and landing issues
  • Needs: Climate Resilience• Critical Transportation Assets– Chickamauga Lock and Dam,– Chattanooga Airport and SR 153 access,– Interchange of I- 75/I-24,– Enterprise South road and rail access, and– Downtown bridges.
  • Needs: Climate Resilience• Potential Adaptation strategies: – More resilient infrastructure design and materials – Establish network redundancy and emergency detours – Better maintenance of drainage systems – Conduct more detailed vulnerability and risk assessment of certain assets• Relation to RTP – Performance measure for network redundancy – Flag RTP projects on identified critical/vulnerable assets and work with project sponsors on resilient design
  • Needs: What Next?• Develop alternative scenarios to address deficiencies: – Spatial component of growth – Balance of modal options – Focus on systems management? – Focus on transit and alternative modes? 51
  • Don’t Forget the WorkshopsDISCUSSION
  • Public Workshop ScheduleOCTOBER 22, 2012 – Constitution Hall – 6:00-8:00 p.m. Soddy-Daisy High School Cafeteria – 6:00-8:00 p.m.OCTOBER 23, 2012 – Downtown Chattanooga – 4:30-7:00 p.m. Collegedale Municipal Building – 6:00-8:00 p.m.