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2012 learning
2012 learning
2012 learning
2012 learning
2012 learning
2012 learning
2012 learning
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2012 learning

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  • 1. LearningAboriginal Canadian High School Completion Rates
  • 2. Significance• Educational attainment is a main determinant of individuals’ future living standards.• Education is strongly linked with future employment status and income level.• High school completion is especially important, because it is considered the bare minimum level of education necessary for the vast majority of jobs.
  • 3. Core Indicator• Aboriginal Canadian high school completion rates are used as a proxy to future employment and living standards.• In 2006, the unemployment rate for Aboriginal Canadians who had completed high school was 11.4 percent, compared to 22.5 percent for those who had not completed high school.
  • 4. Canada’s Major CMAs• Aboriginal Canadian high school completion rates were lower than the total population high school completion rates for almost all of Canada’s major census metropolitan areas (CMAs) in 2006 (see following chart).• The only exception was St. John’s, where the overall high school completion rate was 78.3 percent and the Aboriginal Canadian rate was 78.8 percent, a 0.5 percentage point difference (note that Aboriginal people represented 1.1% of the total St. John in 2006).• The CMAs with the largest discrepancies were Edmonton (17.9 percent difference) and Hamilton (17.7 percent difference).
  • 5. Aboriginal Canadian and Overall High School Completion Rates for Major CMAs, 200690.080.070.060.050.040.030.020.010.0 0.0 Aboriginal Canadian High School Completion Rate Overall high school completion rate Source: Aboriginal Population Profile, Census (2006).
  • 6. CMA Trends (2001 to 2006)• In 2006, 56.3 percent of Aboriginal Canadians 15 years of age and over had completed high school (an increase of 4.3% since 2001 – see following chart).• The rate had increased in all major CMAs except for Calgary and Kitchener who saw declines of 1.6 and 1.5 percentage points, respectively.• Kingston had the largest increase (10.1%), followed by Winnipeg (8.1%).
  • 7. Percentage Point Change in the Aboriginal Canadian High School Completion Rate, 2001 to 200612.010.0 8.0 6.0 4.0 2.0 0.0-2.0-4.0 Source: Statistics Canada, Census (2001 and 2006).

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