2012 getting started

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2012 getting started

  1. 1. Getting StartedYouth (15 to 24 years of age) Unemployment Rate
  2. 2. Significance• The youth unemployment rate encompasses high school and post-secondary graduates seeking to enter the working world.• According to the OECD, youth unemployment must be paid attention to because of its negative implications for young graduates’ future careers called “scarring effects”. “Scarring effects” are the competitive disadvantage that young graduates acquire as a result of having a large period of time between graduation and employment.
  3. 3. Core Indicator• Youth unemployment rate indicates the degree of opportunity offered by the labour market for those just starting their careers.• The youth unemployment rate in Canada was 14.2% in 2011, a 0.6% drop from 14.8% in 2010 and a 1.0% drop from 15.2% in 2009 (see following chart).
  4. 4. Unemployment Rates for Youth in Canada, 1976 - 201120.015.010.0 5.0 0.0 1976 1981 1986 1991 1996 2001 2006 2011 Source: Statistics Canada, CANSIM Table 282-0002 (LFS).
  5. 5. Canada’s Major CMAs• London had the highest youth unemployment rate among Canada’s major CMAs in 2011, at 20.5% (see following chart).• The next highest were Kingston (17.4%) and St. John’s (16.6%).• Edmonton had the lowest rate at 9.2%, followed by Québec City at 9.5%, and Victoria at 10.9%.
  6. 6. Unemployment Rate for Youth in Major CMAs, 201121.018.015.012.0 9.0 6.0 3.0 0.0 Source: Statistics Canada, CANSIM Table 282-0002 (LFS)
  7. 7. CMA Trends (2000 to 2011)• Edmonton and Quebec City had the largest declines in youth unemployment between 2000 and 2011 (see following chart).• London, on the other hand, had a huge increase of 7.2%.• Toronto also experienced a substantial increase of 5.5%, more than three times greater than the increase in the national average in the same time period (1.5%).
  8. 8. Percent Change Unemployment Rates for Youth in Major CMAs, 2000-20118.06.04.02.00.0-2.0-4.0-6.0 Source: Statistics Canada, CANSIM Table 282-0002 (LFS)
  9. 9. Youth Unemployment as a Percent of Total Unemployment• The unemployment rate of youth as a percent of the total unemployment rate increased 3.7% from 2010 to 2011 (see following chart).• Since the relative supply of youth in the labour market has fallen, one might expect their relative labour market performance to improve; however this has not been the case.• The explanation for this paradox is not readily apparent and deserves further study.
  10. 10. Youth Unemployment Rate as a Percent of the Total Unemployment Rate and YouthShare of Working Age Population (aged 15 to 64), Canada, 1976-2011 200.0 31.0 Youth Unemployment Rate as a Per Cent of the Total 29.0 190.0 Youth Share of Working Age Population 27.0 180.0 Unemployment Rate 25.0 170.0 23.0 160.0 21.0 150.0 19.0 140.0 17.0 1976 1981 1986 1991 1996 2001 2006 2011 Youth Unemployment Rate as a Per Cent of the Total Unemployment Rate Youth Share of the Working Age Population (aged 15 to 64) Source: Statistics Canada, CANSIM Table 282-0002 (LFS).

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