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Creative commons and Open Educational Resources

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Joint Presentation by Ms. Jessica Coates and Ms. Jane Hornibrook for Workshop on Open Educational Resources and Open Licensing Policies in the Indian Context on 22 February 2013 at India International …

Joint Presentation by Ms. Jessica Coates and Ms. Jane Hornibrook for Workshop on Open Educational Resources and Open Licensing Policies in the Indian Context on 22 February 2013 at India International Centre, New Delhi.


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  • Non-profit Founded in 2001 These academics became concerned that the default copyright laws that applied in most countries were restricting creativity in the digital environment by preventing people from being able to access, remix and distribute copyright material online Taking inspiration from the open source movement, they decided to develop a set of licences that creators could use to make their material more freely available without giving up their copyright They wanted to replace the standard “all rights reserved” model with a new, more flexible, “some rights reserved”
  • Non-profit Founded in 2001 These academics became concerned that the default copyright laws that applied in most countries were restricting creativity in the digital environment by preventing people from being able to access, remix and distribute copyright material online Taking inspiration from the open source movement, they decided to develop a set of licences that creators could use to make their material more freely available without giving up their copyright They wanted to replace the standard “all rights reserved” model with a new, more flexible, “some rights reserved”
  • Non-profit Founded in 2001 These academics became concerned that the default copyright laws that applied in most countries were restricting creativity in the digital environment by preventing people from being able to access, remix and distribute copyright material online Taking inspiration from the open source movement, they decided to develop a set of licences that creators could use to make their material more freely available without giving up their copyright They wanted to replace the standard “all rights reserved” model with a new, more flexible, “some rights reserved”
  • Non-profit Founded in 2001 These academics became concerned that the default copyright laws that applied in most countries were restricting creativity in the digital environment by preventing people from being able to access, remix and distribute copyright material online Taking inspiration from the open source movement, they decided to develop a set of licences that creators could use to make their material more freely available without giving up their copyright They wanted to replace the standard “all rights reserved” model with a new, more flexible, “some rights reserved”
  • The first CC licences were released in 2002 The central to each of the CC licences are the four licence elements – Attribution, noncommercial, no derivative and sharealike These represent restrictions that copyright owners may want to put on how people can use their material. As you can see, each of the elements has a symbol that can be used to ‘represent’ each of these elements this makes the licences easier understand – in theory, once a person is familiar with the CC licences, they should be able to recognise what uses are allowed simply by looking at the symbols
  • Users can mix and match these elements to set the conditions of use for their material So, for example, an author may be happy to allow private uses of their work, but may want to limit how it can be used commercially. They may also want people to remix their work, but only so long as that person attributes them and makes the new work available for others to remix So they can choose the Attribution-noncommercial-sharealike licence
  • Users can mix and match these elements to set the conditions of use for their material So, for example, an author may be happy to allow private uses of their work, but may want to limit how it can be used commercially. They may also want people to remix their work, but only so long as that person attributes them and makes the new work available for others to remix So they can choose the Attribution-noncommercial-sharealike licence
  • Users can mix and match these elements to set the conditions of use for their material So, for example, an author may be happy to allow private uses of their work, but may want to limit how it can be used commercially. They may also want people to remix their work, but only so long as that person attributes them and makes the new work available for others to remix So they can choose the Attribution-noncommercial-sharealike licence
  • Users can mix and match these elements to set the conditions of use for their material So, for example, an author may be happy to allow private uses of their work, but may want to limit how it can be used commercially. They may also want people to remix their work, but only so long as that person attributes them and makes the new work available for others to remix So they can choose the Attribution-noncommercial-sharealike licence
  • Users can mix and match these elements to set the conditions of use for their material So, for example, an author may be happy to allow private uses of their work, but may want to limit how it can be used commercially. They may also want people to remix their work, but only so long as that person attributes them and makes the new work available for others to remix So they can choose the Attribution-noncommercial-sharealike licence
  • Users can mix and match these elements to set the conditions of use for their material So, for example, an author may be happy to allow private uses of their work, but may want to limit how it can be used commercially. They may also want people to remix their work, but only so long as that person attributes them and makes the new work available for others to remix So they can choose the Attribution-noncommercial-sharealike licence
  • Users can mix and match these elements to set the conditions of use for their material So, for example, an author may be happy to allow private uses of their work, but may want to limit how it can be used commercially. They may also want people to remix their work, but only so long as that person attributes them and makes the new work available for others to remix So they can choose the Attribution-noncommercial-sharealike licence
  • although my experience working with the literary world, I sometimes suspect they think the world is more like this; FLAT!
  • although my experience working with the literary world, I sometimes suspect they think the world is more like this; FLAT!
  • although my experience working with the literary world, I sometimes suspect they think the world is more like this; FLAT!
  • although my experience working with the literary world, I sometimes suspect they think the world is more like this; FLAT!
  • In writing the licences, the main goal was to ensure that the licences are: Voluntary – contrary to some claims, CC isn’t anti-copyright. It just aims to provide options for those copyright owners who do want to make their material more freely available Flexible – unlike other parts of the open access movement, CC licences are specifically designed to provide a range of options for licensors, so that they can choose exactly how they want their material to be used Easy to understand – the academics designing the licences felt that one of the biggest problems with default copyright law is that its so hard for both copyright owners and users to understand. So the licences are specifically designed to be as simple as possible. And, of course, freely available for everyone to use
  • Creative Commons comes in. Hopefully you’ll remember from the last lecture I gave,
  • Transcript

    • 1. Open Education Resources
    • 2. closedby default
    • 3. Layers of openAVAILABILITY (freely available resources) TECHNICAL (open formats) LEGAL (the freedom to share and adapt resources)
    • 4. OER is “educational resources(lesson plans, quizzes, syllabi, instructional modules,simulations, etc.) that are freely available for use, reuse, adaptation, and sharing” - WikiEducator handbook
    • 5. Licensing is important
    • 6. Explicit permission is needed
    • 7. License choice matters
    • 8. Reach your full potential by sharing
    • 9. Provides free licences that creators can apply to their work to signal to others how that work can be used.
    • 10. This creates a pool of materialthat can be shared and reused, legally...
    • 11. Which in turn enables a culture of sharing.
    • 12. It is the legal infrastructure that powers the world of open
    • 13. License Elements Attribution – credit the author Noncommercial – no commercial use No Derivative Works – no remixing Share Alike – remix only if you let others remix
    • 14. Attribution Attribution-ShareAlikeAttribution-Noncommercial Attribution-Noncommercial- ShareAlikeAttribution-NoDerivatives Attribution-Noncommercial- NoDerivatives
    • 15. Attribution
    • 16. AttributionAttribution-Noncommercial
    • 17. AttributionAttribution-NoncommercialAttribution-NoDerivatives
    • 18. Attribution Attribution-ShareAlikeAttribution-NoncommercialAttribution-NoDerivatives
    • 19. Attribution Attribution-ShareAlikeAttribution-Noncommercial Attribution-Noncommercial- ShareAlikeAttribution-NoDerivatives
    • 20. Attribution Attribution-ShareAlikeAttribution-Noncommercial Attribution-Noncommercial- ShareAlikeAttribution-NoDerivatives Attribution-Noncommercial- NoDerivatives
    • 21. search.creativecommons.org
    • 22. http://creativecommons.org.au/infopacks/findingmaterial
    • 23. Thinking Hot by Lisandro Moises Enriqueavailable at http://www.flickr.com/photos/latente/2041435108/under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 licence Before you use remember to: • obey the licence • attribute • think about other rights (privacy etc) • use your common sense
    • 24. Thinking Hot by Lisandro Moises Enriqueavailable at http://www.flickr.com/photos/latente/2041435108/under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 licence Before you license, think: Who do you want to use the material, and when? Are you choosing the right licence? Do you have the rights to license the material? Are you using anyone else’s material? Are you sure? You cant change your mind (or not easily)
    • 25. OER in action
    • 26. Repositories● collection of materials available for reuse● basic resource that fuels the oer ecosystem● open licence permits reuse, collaboration, adaptation
    • 27. Open Textbooks● prefunded textbooks under open licences● reduced costs for schools and students, flexibleformats and delivery, improves materials● open license allows teacher to update, localize,customise
    • 28. MOOCs● online courses available for anyone in the world to participate● makes learning available to anyone; increasescourses reach, effectiveness, impact.● open licence enables translation, & increasesreach, cutting down on license inquiries
    • 29. Peer Learning● peer driven online courses, written by anyone foranyone● democratizes learning, empowers individuals tobecome teacher and student● open licensing fundamental to crowdsourcingmodel
    • 30. OER policies● policies that make OER the default practice● from Governments to universities to individual schools● see examples http://wiki.creativecommons.org/ OER_Policy_Registry
    • 31. Thank youwww.creativecommons.orgjessica@creativecommons.orgjane@creativecommons.orgUnless otherwise notice, this slide show and all materials in itis licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence. Formore information seehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0.background image “culture exhausts anyone” by procsilasflickr.com/photos/procsilas/343784334, CC BY
    • 32. Useful links http://wiki.creativecommons.org/OER creativecommons.org/education wikieducator.org ocwconsortium.org P2Pu.org●