Developing Social Work
Leadership in IPE
CSWE Annual Program Meeting
Dallas, Texas
October 31, 2013
Barbara L. Jones, PhD,...
Our goals for today
 Review the current state of Interprofessional Education
(IPE)
 Identify the connections between IPE...
Introductions

 Why are you here?
 Why do we care about IPE?
Historical Context of SW in
Interdisciplinary Practice
Shelley Cohen Konrad
Social Work Leadership &
Interprofessional Education

Is health a human
right?
Social Work as a Health Profession
Public Health Act, 1992
• Titles VII and VIII of the Public Health Services Act (PHA) e...
U.S. Department of Education 1995
“… a new way of preparing all professionals needs to be built. This will
require changes...
The Interdisciplinary Movement
“Education on all levels needs to forge institutional
ties with health care providers and i...
Institute of Medicine (IOM) 1999

44,000 – 99,000
DEATHS every
year in the U.S.
from preventable
adverse events –
medical ...
Crossing the Quality Chasm (2001)
“One approach is to redesign the way health
professionals are trained and to emphasize t...
IPE and the Strengths Perspective
“Highlighting the strengths of multiple disciplines along with
the merits of interdiscip...
Roles & Responsibilities
“Social work students who are
exposed to the benefits of
collaboration and taught
effective colla...
Collaboration:
A Social Work Method
Collaboration
proposes joint
sharing and
decision-making
in the interest of
change, as...
Collaboration: Social Work Definition
“… interdisciplinary collaboration is the achievement of goals that cannot be reache...
Intentional Culture Change
Collaboration is an intervention that begins with
communication, requires preparation, and ends...
Collaboration
Social Work Model
“Trends in social problems and professional
practice make it virtually impossible to serve...
Natural Collaborations

Social
Work &
Public
Health

Schoolbased
Practice

Practice
with
Children
&
Families
/Child
Welfar...
Collaboration takes place when
“autonomous, interdependent stakeholders with their
respective competency domains” organize...
Interprofessional
Collaboration

Community
Collaboration

Inter-organizational
/Interagency

• When expertise of different...
World Health Organization (2010)
“Once students understand how to work
interprofessionally, they are ready to enter the
wo...
International Federation of Social Work -

2013
Strategies for intervention, desired end states and policy
frameworks are ...
Making Interdisciplinary Collaboration Work
Interdisciplinary Collaboration can be one of the most rewarding, yet
challeng...
IPE-Current Definitions
and Competencies
Maureen Rubin
IPE Definition
 “Interprofessional Education occurs when two or
more professions learn with, from and about each
other to...
World Health Organization (2010). Framework for Action on
Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice. Page 9.
...
Interprofessionality
 “the process by which professionals reflect on and develop
ways of practicing that provides an inte...
Core Competencies for
Interprofessional Collaborative
Practice (May 2011)
 Sponsored by the Interprofessional Education
C...
Why core competencies are
needed?
1. Create a coordinated effort across the health
professions to embed essential content ...
Why core competencies are
needed? Contd.
5.

6.

7.

Prompt dialogue to evaluate the “fit” between
educationally identifie...
Why core competencies are
needed? Contd.
8.

Inform professional licensing and credentialing bodies in
defining potential ...
Core competencies
 Competency Domain 1: Values/Ethics for Interprofessional
Practice
 Competency Domain 2: Roles/Respons...
Small Group Discussion
Barbara Jones
Film/Case Discussion
Shelley Cohen Konrad
Meet Pat Chalmers
Patricia Chalmers, 31
Patricia (Pat) Chalmers is a 31-year-old woman who prides herself
on self-sufficiency and resourcefu...
Questions
1. What do we know about Pat?
2. How can Pat’s case be used to educate social work
and other health professions ...
Exemplars
Obstacles & Barriers to
IPE Development
Shelley and Jay
Activity
 As you think about your experience in creating/implementing IPE
in your school what challenges you have faced?
...
• Curricular
differences
• Accreditation
• Too much
Content
• Different
Assessment
Tools
• Misalignment
of Academic
IPE an...
ATTITUDINAL BARRIERS
SILOED TRAINING

NO EXPOSURE

HISTORIC RIVALRIES

STEREOTYPES

IPE SKEPTISM

MEDICAL MODEL

STUDENT D...
Professional Barriers
 Profession-centrism – preferred view of the world:
“Interdisciplinary context requires the ability...
Example – Profession-centrism
 Article response from prominent Social Work Journal:
This is a notable beginning for the i...
Barriers within our profession
 Collaboration is ethically challenging
 Professional training guides social workers to a...
Critical Constructionism
“Social work designed from the standpoint of critical construction
… helps clarify and make trans...
Working with professional differences
Collaboration assumes the inevitability of conflicting ideas;
differentials in power...
“Collaboration proposes joint sharing and decision-making in the
interest of change, as well as changes in relationships t...
Leadership
Barbara Jones and Maureen Rubin
Social Workers as Leaders of IPE
CSWE White House Briefing - Oct 2013
Addressing the Social Determinants of Health in a
New Era: The Role of Social Work Ed...
CSWE Leadership for IPE…
According to Dean Barbara Shank, Chair, Board of
Directors, and CSWE President, Darla Spence Coff...
CSWE, APM – Track:
Interprofessional and
Transdisciplinary Practice
 Strengthen the areas of interprofessional
practice, ...
Affordable Care Act (ACA) and IPE
 ACA became law in 2010
 It is expected to bring
 Insurance reform
 Health System Re...
Subtitle F—Health Care Quality Improvements
Subpart II—Health Care Quality Improvement
Programs
SEC. 3502 o42 U.S.C. 256a–...
IPE in Cancer Care
IOM, 2013
 The IOM committee will
examine opportunities for
and challenges to the
delivery of high-qua...
Recommendations
Recommendation 3
 Academic institutions and professional societies should
develop interprofessional education programs.
The Need for Interprofessional
Collaboration – International
perspective (WHO, 2010)
 Family and Community Health
 women...
The Need for Interprofessional
Collaboration contd..
 Health Security
 Epidemics and pandemics place sudden and intense
...
Social work education:
International perspective
 Infuse in curriculum
 Field placement
 Study-abroad
 Exchange progra...
The IPE Strategic
Advantage: A Social
Work Dean’s Perspective
Anna Scheyett
University of South Carolina
In addition to all the benefits already
articulated, there are a number of
strategic advantages to IPE for
deans…but they ...
Your job is to make them aware.
Here are a few suggestions for talking
points.
“Involvement with IPE makes
Social Work more competitive
within the university”
 Increases:

 Other departments’ and col...
“Involvement with IPE makes
Social Work more competitive
within the university”
 Increases:
Opportunity to “be at the ta...
“IPE furthers the agenda of upper
administration”
A good IPE program can make a Provost
and a President happy by:
 Enhan...
“IPE furthers the agenda of upper
administration”
A good IPE program can make a Provost
and a President happy by:
 Incre...
“IPE makes us stand out with
external constituents”
Funders (private and governmental) and
providers will think highly of...
Communicating Your Message
If you are engaged in IPE:
 Include IPE in recruitment materials
 Work to get internal and e...
Communicating Your Message
If you are not yet engaged in IPE, but are
working to develop:
 Make sure to create a clear m...
Group Activity in Teams
Jayashree Nimmagadda
Conclusion
Next Steps
Barbara Jones
CSWE Social Work and Leadership
CSWE Social Work and Leadership
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CSWE Social Work and Leadership

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University of New England's Center for Excellence in Interprofessional Education Director Shelley Cohen Konrad presents at the annual meeting of The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), a nonprofit national association representing more than 2,500 individual members, as well as graduate and undergraduate programs of professional social work education.

This collaborative presentation is the work of
Barbara L. Jones, PhD, MSW, University of Texas at Austin
Shelley Cohen Konrad, PhD, LCSW, University of New England
Jayashree Nimmagadda, Ph.D., MSW., LICSW, Rhode Island College
Maureen Rubin, Ph.D., MSW, MA, University of Nevada, Reno
Anna M. Scheyett, PhD, MSW, LCSW, University of South Carolina

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  • The status quo is not acceptable and cannot be tolerated any longer. Despite cost pressures, liability constraints, resistance to change and seemingly insurmountable barriers, it is simply not acceptable for patients to be harmed by the same health care system that is supposed to offer healing and comfort
  • CSWE Social Work and Leadership

    1. 1. Developing Social Work Leadership in IPE CSWE Annual Program Meeting Dallas, Texas October 31, 2013 Barbara L. Jones, PhD, MSW, University of Texas at Austin Shelley Cohen Konrad, PhD, LCSW, University of New England Jayashree Nimmagadda, Ph.D., MSW., LICSW, Rhode Island College Maureen Rubin, Ph.D., MSW, MA, University of Nevada, Reno Anna M. Scheyett, PhD, MSW, LCSW, University of South Carolina
    2. 2. Our goals for today  Review the current state of Interprofessional Education (IPE)  Identify the connections between IPE and SW  Discuss obstacles and successes in IPE development  Describe the leadership roles and strategic opportunities for social work
    3. 3. Introductions  Why are you here?  Why do we care about IPE?
    4. 4. Historical Context of SW in Interdisciplinary Practice Shelley Cohen Konrad
    5. 5. Social Work Leadership & Interprofessional Education Is health a human right?
    6. 6. Social Work as a Health Profession Public Health Act, 1992 • Titles VII and VIII of the Public Health Services Act (PHA) expanded the geographic, racial and ethnic distribution of the health care workforce. • Increased number of providers working in the public health sector and improving diversity of the public health work force. • Increased the number of underrepresented minorities in the health care field. • Minority providers are more likely to treat minority patients and provide health care to poor, uninsured and publicly insured patients, improving access to care. • 2001 review of PHA found that training workforce in “interdisciplinary” and “community-based” concepts was effective and ensured national best practice sustainability in underserved geographic regions or in service to vulnerable populations.
    7. 7. U.S. Department of Education 1995 “… a new way of preparing all professionals needs to be built. This will require changes throughout the campus culture and new relationships between professional preparation programs, communities, and clients.” Allen-Meares, P. (1998). The interdisciplinary movement. J SW in Education, 34(1), 2-5.
    8. 8. The Interdisciplinary Movement “Education on all levels needs to forge institutional ties with health care providers and incorporate into curriculum interactions with students from fields such as medicine, nursing, education, law, economics, and political science.” Allen-Meares, P. (1998). The interdisciplinary movement. J SW in Education, 34(1), 2-5.
    9. 9. Institute of Medicine (IOM) 1999 44,000 – 99,000 DEATHS every year in the U.S. from preventable adverse events – medical errors
    10. 10. Crossing the Quality Chasm (2001) “One approach is to redesign the way health professionals are trained and to emphasize the six aims for improvement, which will mean placing more stress on teaching evidence-based practice and providing more opportunities for interdisciplinary training.”
    11. 11. IPE and the Strengths Perspective “Highlighting the strengths of multiple disciplines along with the merits of interdisciplinary collaboration not only exposes students to collaboration early in their careers, but also enables instructors to model the strengths perspective” Berg-Weger, M. & Schneider, F. D. (1998). Interdisciplinary collaboration in social work education. J of SW Education, 34(1), 97-107.
    12. 12. Roles & Responsibilities “Social work students who are exposed to the benefits of collaboration and taught effective collaboration skills early in their training can become effective collaborators throughout their careers.” “Highlighting the strengths of multiple disciplines along with the merits of interdisciplinary collaboration not only exposes students to collaboration early in their careers, but also enables instructors to model the strengths perspective.” Berg-Weger, M. & Schneider, F. D. (1998). Interdisciplinary collaboration in social work education. J of SW Education, 34(1), 97-107.
    13. 13. Collaboration: A Social Work Method Collaboration proposes joint sharing and decision-making in the interest of change, as well as changes in relationships to facilitate these ends. Collaboration assumes the inevitability of conflicting ideas; differentials in power; and necessity of compromise and continued advocacy. Graham, J. R., Barter, K. (1999). Collaboration: A social work practice method. FIS, 80(1), 6-13.
    14. 14. Collaboration: Social Work Definition “… interdisciplinary collaboration is the achievement of goals that cannot be reached when individual professions act on their own.” Bronstein, L. R. (2003). A Model for Interdisciplinary Collaboration, Social Work, 48(3), 297-306.
    15. 15. Intentional Culture Change Collaboration is an intervention that begins with communication, requires preparation, and ends with collaboration. Script Writer Pharmacy Student playing a NA PT Playing a Nurse Videogra -pher Change requires careful preparation.
    16. 16. Collaboration Social Work Model “Trends in social problems and professional practice make it virtually impossible to serve clients effectively without collaborating with professionals from various disciplines.” Bronstein, L. R. (2003). A Model for Interdisciplinary Collaboration, Social Work, 48(3), 297-306.
    17. 17. Natural Collaborations Social Work & Public Health Schoolbased Practice Practice with Children & Families /Child Welfare Social Work & Health Care Social work & Criminal Justice Social Work & Social Service
    18. 18. Collaboration takes place when “autonomous, interdependent stakeholders with their respective competency domains” organize around common goals for the greater good. Building Trust Naming Power Inequities Resolving Conflict Client Family Community Strategies for cooperation Managing Diversity
    19. 19. Interprofessional Collaboration Community Collaboration Inter-organizational /Interagency • When expertise of different professions come together to facilitate culturally responsive services, structures and practices • Systems and Ecological; Functional School, Group Dynamics • When expertise of all stakeholders comes together to improve the well-being of community residents • Community Organization, Participatory Advocacy Models, and Community Economic Development • When independent organizations with different missions come together to work together towards a common purpose • Network Theory; Exchange Theory; Organizational Culture Theory Claiborne, N. & Lawson, H. A. (2005). An intervention framework for collaboration. FIS, 86(1), 93-103.
    20. 20. World Health Organization (2010) “Once students understand how to work interprofessionally, they are ready to enter the workplace as a member of the collaborative practice team.”
    21. 21. International Federation of Social Work - 2013 Strategies for intervention, desired end states and policy frameworks are based on holistic, biopsychosocial, spiritual assessments and interventions that transcend the micro-macro divide, incorporating multiple systems levels and inter-sectorial and interprofessional collaboration.
    22. 22. Making Interdisciplinary Collaboration Work Interdisciplinary Collaboration can be one of the most rewarding, yet challenging, aspects of social work practice. It’s also increasingly essential, regardless of practice setting or client population. [NASW ToolsNational Association of Social Workers& Techniques] Winter 2013 Identify and Understand the Acknowledge Be proactive in Address conflict seek common roles and the differences establishing Articulate your and don’t let ground with responsibilities among social and maintaining your role in the team resentment of other team work and other collegial accumulate interdisciplinary members disciplines relationships colleagues http://www.socialworkers.org/assets/secured/documents/practice/interdisciplinarycollaboration.pdf
    23. 23. IPE-Current Definitions and Competencies Maureen Rubin
    24. 24. IPE Definition  “Interprofessional Education occurs when two or more professions learn with, from and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of care.”(CAIPE, 2002).  Interprofessional education/training (IPE): Members (or students) of two or more professions associated with health or social care, engaged in learning with, from and about each other. It is an initiative to secure interprofessional learning and promote gains through interprofessional collaboration in professional practice. (Freeth, Hammick, Reeves, Koppel and Barr, 2005)
    25. 25. World Health Organization (2010). Framework for Action on Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice. Page 9. Switzerland, Geneva.
    26. 26. Interprofessionality  “the process by which professionals reflect on and develop ways of practicing that provides an integrated and cohesive answer to the needs of the client/family/population…{I}t involves continuous interaction and knowledge sharing between professionals, organized to solve or explore a variety of education and care issues all while seeking to optimize the patient‟s participation….Interprofessionality requires a paradigm shift, since interprofessional practice has unique characteristics in terms of values, codes of conduct and ways of working. These characteristics must be elucidated” (p.9) D‟Amour and Oandasan (2005). Inerprofessionality as the field of interprofessional practice and interprofessional education: An emerging concept.
    27. 27. Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (May 2011)  Sponsored by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC)  American Association of Colleges of Nursing  American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine  American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy  American Dental Education Association  Association of American Medical Colleges  Association of Schools of Public Health
    28. 28. Why core competencies are needed? 1. Create a coordinated effort across the health professions to embed essential content in all health professions education curricula 2. Guide professional and institutional curricular development of learning approaches and assessment strategies to achieve productive outcomes 3. Provide the foundation for a learning continuum in interprofessional competency development across the progressions and the lifelong learning trajectory 4. Acknowledge that evaluation and research work will strengthen the scholarship in this area
    29. 29. Why core competencies are needed? Contd. 5. 6. 7. Prompt dialogue to evaluate the “fit” between educationally identified core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice and practice needs/demands Find opportunities to integrate essential interprofessional education content consistent with current accreditation expectations for each health professions education program Offer information to accreditors of educational programs across the health professions that they can use to set common accreditation standards for interprofessional education, and to know here to look in institutional settings for examples of implementation of those standards
    30. 30. Why core competencies are needed? Contd. 8. Inform professional licensing and credentialing bodies in defining potential testing content for interprofessional collaborative practice
    31. 31. Core competencies  Competency Domain 1: Values/Ethics for Interprofessional Practice  Competency Domain 2: Roles/Responsibilities  Competency Domain 3: Interprofessional Communication  Competency Domain 4: Teams and Teamwork
    32. 32. Small Group Discussion Barbara Jones
    33. 33. Film/Case Discussion Shelley Cohen Konrad
    34. 34. Meet Pat Chalmers
    35. 35. Patricia Chalmers, 31 Patricia (Pat) Chalmers is a 31-year-old woman who prides herself on self-sufficiency and resourcefulness. She works part-time as a bookkeeper and gets paid to take care of her aging grandmother with whom she lives. Pat describes herself as having been a caretaker since adolescence. It is therefore difficult for her to acknowledge her own needs or to seek others for help. Pat is tired of people commenting on her weight, diet, and need to exercise. She avoids health care as much as possible because she knows she’ll be told to lose weight or be blamed for “being fat” (her words). “I know what risks I face” she says. “But I’ve tried everything and nothing works. I’ve accepted my size and would like others to respect that.” Pat found herself in the ED with a broken ankle several months ago. The break was significant enough to require surgery. Labs revealed elevated glucose levels and surgery was put off until further tests could be done to determine whether Pat might have diabetes. When asked about this possibility, Pat reacted strongly. “I don’t have the time or money for diabetes,” she explained.
    36. 36. Questions 1. What do we know about Pat? 2. How can Pat’s case be used to educate social work and other health professions students in IPE competencies? Social determinants of health? 3. What health professions might contribute to Pat’s rehabilitation and recovery? 4. How can Pat’s case be used for health professions faculty development?
    37. 37. Exemplars
    38. 38. Obstacles & Barriers to IPE Development Shelley and Jay
    39. 39. Activity  As you think about your experience in creating/implementing IPE in your school what challenges you have faced? Single Discipline Multiple Disciplines
    40. 40. • Curricular differences • Accreditation • Too much Content • Different Assessment Tools • Misalignment of Academic IPE and IPC Site Readiness SCHEDULES • Funding • Faculty Workload • Faculty Training • Onsite Faculty ACADEMIC-PRACTICE BUDGET Administrative & Curricular Barriers • Different Academic Calendars • Different Credit Systems • Different Practice Schedules
    41. 41. ATTITUDINAL BARRIERS SILOED TRAINING NO EXPOSURE HISTORIC RIVALRIES STEREOTYPES IPE SKEPTISM MEDICAL MODEL STUDENT DISINTEREST NO MODELS
    42. 42. Professional Barriers  Profession-centrism – preferred view of the world: “Interdisciplinary context requires the ability to suspend the tendency to evaluate difference as right or wrong.” Dewees, M. (2004). Postmodern social work in interdisciplinary contexts: Making space on both sides of the table. Social Work in Health, 39(3/4), 343-360.
    43. 43. Example – Profession-centrism  Article response from prominent Social Work Journal: This is a notable beginning for the interdisciplinary work of social work and nursing and I applaud the effort. However, the current manuscript is quite slanted toward the value of nursing and less so towards social work. One example is the following excerpt: Nursing student: when do I call for a social worker? Social work student: “How do I talk to a nurse when they are so busy and doing important medical things?” Don't social workers do important things as well? You may think that I have missed the point of your work, but I have a great deal of respect for your attempt to write this paper. It requires additional thinking about how it would be read by social work educators who are the primary readers of this journal. Finally, the references only include 2 articles from social work journals. I know that many exist in health care and even in hospital care. Please consult the journals Social Work in Health Care and also, Health and Social Work for current social work involvement in the health care field.
    44. 44. Barriers within our profession  Collaboration is ethically challenging  Professional training guides social workers to advocate for social justice and client empowerment. How then does one advocate while also being a member of the team?  Social Work Identity
    45. 45. Critical Constructionism “Social work designed from the standpoint of critical construction … helps clarify and make transparent professional expertise through raising differences and assumptions, honoring the multiplicity of ideas and possibilities, and reflexively working through them. It can make space at the table for differing professional views as well as differences between the team and the family” (Dewees, 2004).
    46. 46. Working with professional differences Collaboration assumes the inevitability of conflicting ideas; differentials in power; and necessity of compromise and continued advocacy (Graham & Barter,1999).
    47. 47. “Collaboration proposes joint sharing and decision-making in the interest of change, as well as changes in relationships to facilitate these ends” (Graham & Barter,1999). “Only after disciplines become aware of how others can contribute to achieving shared goals can the stages of realistic appraisal, accommodation, and integration take place” (Germain, 1984).
    48. 48. Leadership Barbara Jones and Maureen Rubin
    49. 49. Social Workers as Leaders of IPE
    50. 50. CSWE White House Briefing - Oct 2013 Addressing the Social Determinants of Health in a New Era: The Role of Social Work Education.  Preparing the next generation of social work practitioners for the new paradigm in health professional education and collaborative practice to meet the needs of all Americans.  The briefing featured panels of White House and federal agency officials speaking on the following topics:  Shifting US Demographics: Ensuring Care for All  New Expectations for Health Care: Including Interprofessional Health Care  National Dialogue on Mental Health  Building Capacity to Meet the Need
    51. 51. CSWE Leadership for IPE… According to Dean Barbara Shank, Chair, Board of Directors, and CSWE President, Darla Spence Coffey:  CSWE is very supportive of social work programs and educators' engagement with interprofessional practice.  Many programs are engaged, and the 2014 Annual Survey of Accredited Programs is going to include questions that will allow CSWE to more clearly articulate social work's investment and activity in the interprofessional "space."  CSWE strongly encourages people to advocate for social work being at the table in IPE discussions.
    52. 52. CSWE, APM – Track: Interprofessional and Transdisciplinary Practice  Strengthen the areas of interprofessional practice, education, and research  collaborative initiatives between social workers and other professionals to address micro and macro work related to social issues, ethical dilemmas across professions  researchers, practitioners, and educators explore and examine social problems, target populations, and practice interventions through an interdisciplinary lens, as well as how such teams recommend measures for social policy, education, and practice.
    53. 53. Affordable Care Act (ACA) and IPE  ACA became law in 2010  It is expected to bring  Insurance reform  Health System Reform  With increased need for workforce, need to establish Interprofessional team is included
    54. 54. Subtitle F—Health Care Quality Improvements Subpart II—Health Care Quality Improvement Programs SEC. 3502 o42 U.S.C. 256a–1 - ESTABLISHING COMMUNITY HEALTH TEAMS TO SUPPORT THE PATIENT-CENTERED MEDICAL HOME. (p.435) (a) IN GENERAL. — The Secretary of Health and Human Services (referred to in this section as the „„Secretary‟‟) shall establish a program to provide grants to or enter into contracts with eligible entities to establish community-based interdisciplinary, interprofessional teams (referred to in this section as „„health teams‟‟) to support primary care practices, including obstetrics and gynecology practices, within the hospital service areas served by the eligible entities. Grants or contracts shall be used to— (1) establish health teams to provide support services to primary care providers; and (2) provide capitated payments to primary care providers as determined by the Secretary. (b) ELIGIBLE ENTITIES.—To be eligible to receive a grant or contract under subsection (a), an entity shall— (1)(A) be a State or State-designated entity; or (B) be an Indian tribe or tribal organization, as defined in section 4 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act; (2) ensure that the health team established by the entity includes an interdisciplinary, interprofessional team of health care providers, as determined by the Secretary; such team may include medical specialists, nurses, pharmacists, nutritionists, dieticians, social workers, behavioral and mental health providers (including substance use disorder prevention and treatment providers), doctors of chiropractic, licensed complementary and alternative medicine practitioners, and physicians‟ assistants
    55. 55. IPE in Cancer Care IOM, 2013  The IOM committee will examine opportunities for and challenges to the delivery of high-quality cancer care and formulate recommendations for improvement. www.iom.edu/qualitycancer care
    56. 56. Recommendations
    57. 57. Recommendation 3  Academic institutions and professional societies should develop interprofessional education programs.
    58. 58. The Need for Interprofessional Collaboration – International perspective (WHO, 2010)  Family and Community Health  women worldwide die from complications in pregnancy or childbirth  HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria  expertise and resources critical to the success of disease management  Health action in crisis  Interprofessional education provides health workers with the kind of skills needed to coordinate the delivery of care when emergency situations arise.
    59. 59. The Need for Interprofessional Collaboration contd..  Health Security  Epidemics and pandemics place sudden and intense demands on the health system - collaboration among health workers is the only way to manage the crisis.  Non-Communicable Diseases  Interprofessional teams - more comprehensive approach to preventing and managing chronic conditions such as dementia, malnutrition and asthma  Health Systems and Services  Interprofessional education and collaborative practice – enables health workers to function at the highest capacity.
    60. 60. Social work education: International perspective  Infuse in curriculum  Field placement  Study-abroad  Exchange programs  Fulbright scholarship  University-community collaboration to prepare students to work in their own communities – refugees, immigrants, etc.
    61. 61. The IPE Strategic Advantage: A Social Work Dean’s Perspective Anna Scheyett University of South Carolina
    62. 62. In addition to all the benefits already articulated, there are a number of strategic advantages to IPE for deans…but they may not be fully aware of them.
    63. 63. Your job is to make them aware. Here are a few suggestions for talking points.
    64. 64. “Involvement with IPE makes Social Work more competitive within the university”  Increases:  Other departments’ and colleges’ understanding of Social Work as a discipline (internal public education)  Other departments’ and colleges’ understanding of the value-added Social Work brings to a collaboration  Other departments’ and colleges’ awareness of Social Work faculty skills and capacities
    65. 65. “Involvement with IPE makes Social Work more competitive within the university”  Increases: Opportunity to “be at the table” for large interdisciplinary grants Ability to recruit excellent students and have students from other disciplines take our courses Opportunity for joint appointments and creative hires Scholarly productivity and funding, and thus successful faculty
    66. 66. “IPE furthers the agenda of upper administration” A good IPE program can make a Provost and a President happy by:  Enhancing the reputation of the university and creating a niche  Attracting and retaining excellent faculty  Attracting and retaining excellent students, both graduate and undergraduate
    67. 67. “IPE furthers the agenda of upper administration” A good IPE program can make a Provost and a President happy by:  Increasing collaboration and decreasing silos across the university  Increasing opportunities for service learning  Enhancing the potential for large interdisciplinary grants and centers
    68. 68. “IPE makes us stand out with external constituents” Funders (private and governmental) and providers will think highly of us because: We are training students in a model that is  Evidence-based  Cost-effective  Congruent with current health policies (e.g. ACA)  i.e. we are graduating students who can “hit the ground running” in contemporary health settings We are raising the profile of the social work profession in the health community
    69. 69. Communicating Your Message If you are engaged in IPE:  Include IPE in recruitment materials  Work to get internal and external press  Find champions outside of IPE  Publish  Include IPE in your annual performance report  Give your dean regular outcome-driven reports  Give your dean “good news” s/he can share with the Provost  Meet with your dean to talk about the ROI of IPE for social work
    70. 70. Communicating Your Message If you are not yet engaged in IPE, but are working to develop:  Make sure to create a clear mission statement and goals  Get your dean involved early  Invite experienced IPE educators to campus for seminar, workshop, colloquium  Gather literature, examples from other universities, funding opportunities, evidence of ROI  Keep talking!!!
    71. 71. Group Activity in Teams Jayashree Nimmagadda
    72. 72. Conclusion Next Steps Barbara Jones

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