Cdec bristol

375 views
261 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
375
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • As the video in the last slide hinted, the data value chain is potentially enormous and in CDEC we have put a lot of thought into trying to map that value chain to see what would be the most useful entry point for us as an organisation and where might we be able to add the most value ourselves.
    It’s a smorgasboard of potential value - cities, transport, energy, government, culture, education, health - so we have defined the areas where we feel we can initially add most value as these three areas.
  • Creative Media, Health and Digitally Enabled Cities. And when addressing these three areas we have identified four key challenges that we are structuring our project approach to address. These are….
  • The difficulty of integrating and mashing up different data sets and sources. These involve skill sets that don’t always reside in the SME community, or that can be costly for them to access and deploy or difficult for them to know where to access. We can offer help here with our technology capability and access to R&D and Academic communities.
    Exploiting next generation connectivity.
    Horizon scanning and keeping abreast of the next big thing is an important element of entrepreneurship and innovation. But often smaller companies don’t have the time or space to play and experiment with what is coming next to better understand how they may need to configure or iterate their products to remain relevant.
    We can give them that opportunity by providing a physical space where they can come and test and experiment with a community of their peers.
    Developing successful products and services. We know that our innovator and technology community are completely adept at creating new ideas
    and bootstrapping their businesses with ingenuity and skill. But sometimes the start-up runway is tight. Many of the revolutionary technologies that made the iPhone and other services “smart” were actually the result of government funding.
    The Internet, GPS, touchscreen displays as well as Siri did not just benefit from government-funded research activity but also received early stage finance from the US government Small Business Investment Company Program. In these cases the venture capitalists entered only after government research funding had gotten these companies to the critical proof of concept. Google’s algorithm, don’t forget, was funded by the National Science Foundation.
    So, we feel that CDEC can play its part by supporting our innovators in the UK in much the same way. We can help scale, we can provide a place to play and experiment and we can network SME’s into bigger business, R&D and Academia to help make that runway a little bit longer.
  • SOME KICK OFF ALREADY – WE ARE GETTING GOING
    STRATEGIC AND QUICKSTART – PORTFOLIO
    EXPLAIN DCX AND WHITESPACE AS LARGE STRATEGIC DOTS
    EXPLAIN TRUSTED DATA SANDPIT – HORIZONTAL CAPABILITY – EXPLAIN THE BIG COMPANIES ENGAGED
    SOME STEADY CAPABILITIES AND FACILITIES BUILT - TO ADDRESS BOTTOM TWO CHALLENGES
    EXPLAIN INNOVATOR CENTER
  • The difficulty of integrating and mashing up different data sets and sources. These involve skill sets that don’t always reside in the SME community, or that can be costly for them to access and deploy or difficult for them to know where to access. We can offer help here with our technology capability and access to R&D and Academic communities.
    Exploiting next generation connectivity.
    Horizon scanning and keeping abreast of the next big thing is an important element of entrepreneurship and innovation. But often smaller companies don’t have the time or space to play and experiment with what is coming next to better understand how they may need to configure or iterate their products to remain relevant.
    We can give them that opportunity by providing a physical space where they can come and test and experiment with a community of their peers.
    Developing successful products and services. We know that our innovator and technology community are completely adept at creating new ideas
    and bootstrapping their businesses with ingenuity and skill. But sometimes the start-up runway is tight. Many of the revolutionary technologies that made the iPhone and other services “smart” were actually the result of government funding.
    The Internet, GPS, touchscreen displays as well as Siri did not just benefit from government-funded research activity but also received early stage finance from the US government Small Business Investment Company Program. In these cases the venture capitalists entered only after government research funding had gotten these companies to the critical proof of concept. Google’s algorithm, don’t forget, was funded by the National Science Foundation.
    So, we feel that CDEC can play its part by supporting our innovators in the UK in much the same way. We can help scale, we can provide a place to play and experiment and we can network SME’s into bigger business, R&D and Academia to help make that runway a little bit longer.
  • The difficulty of integrating and mashing up different data sets and sources. These involve skill sets that don’t always reside in the SME community, or that can be costly for them to access and deploy or difficult for them to know where to access. We can offer help here with our technology capability and access to R&D and Academic communities.
    Exploiting next generation connectivity.
    Horizon scanning and keeping abreast of the next big thing is an important element of entrepreneurship and innovation. But often smaller companies don’t have the time or space to play and experiment with what is coming next to better understand how they may need to configure or iterate their products to remain relevant.
    We can give them that opportunity by providing a physical space where they can come and test and experiment with a community of their peers.
    Developing successful products and services. We know that our innovator and technology community are completely adept at creating new ideas
    and bootstrapping their businesses with ingenuity and skill. But sometimes the start-up runway is tight. Many of the revolutionary technologies that made the iPhone and other services “smart” were actually the result of government funding.
    The Internet, GPS, touchscreen displays as well as Siri did not just benefit from government-funded research activity but also received early stage finance from the US government Small Business Investment Company Program. In these cases the venture capitalists entered only after government research funding had gotten these companies to the critical proof of concept. Google’s algorithm, don’t forget, was funded by the National Science Foundation.
    So, we feel that CDEC can play its part by supporting our innovators in the UK in much the same way. We can help scale, we can provide a place to play and experiment and we can network SME’s into bigger business, R&D and Academia to help make that runway a little bit longer.
  • The difficulty of integrating and mashing up different data sets and sources. These involve skill sets that don’t always reside in the SME community, or that can be costly for them to access and deploy or difficult for them to know where to access. We can offer help here with our technology capability and access to R&D and Academic communities.
    Exploiting next generation connectivity.
    Horizon scanning and keeping abreast of the next big thing is an important element of entrepreneurship and innovation. But often smaller companies don’t have the time or space to play and experiment with what is coming next to better understand how they may need to configure or iterate their products to remain relevant.
    We can give them that opportunity by providing a physical space where they can come and test and experiment with a community of their peers.
    Developing successful products and services. We know that our innovator and technology community are completely adept at creating new ideas
    and bootstrapping their businesses with ingenuity and skill. But sometimes the start-up runway is tight. Many of the revolutionary technologies that made the iPhone and other services “smart” were actually the result of government funding.
    The Internet, GPS, touchscreen displays as well as Siri did not just benefit from government-funded research activity but also received early stage finance from the US government Small Business Investment Company Program. In these cases the venture capitalists entered only after government research funding had gotten these companies to the critical proof of concept. Google’s algorithm, don’t forget, was funded by the National Science Foundation.
    So, we feel that CDEC can play its part by supporting our innovators in the UK in much the same way. We can help scale, we can provide a place to play and experiment and we can network SME’s into bigger business, R&D and Academia to help make that runway a little bit longer.
  • The difficulty of integrating and mashing up different data sets and sources. These involve skill sets that don’t always reside in the SME community, or that can be costly for them to access and deploy or difficult for them to know where to access. We can offer help here with our technology capability and access to R&D and Academic communities.
    Exploiting next generation connectivity.
    Horizon scanning and keeping abreast of the next big thing is an important element of entrepreneurship and innovation. But often smaller companies don’t have the time or space to play and experiment with what is coming next to better understand how they may need to configure or iterate their products to remain relevant.
    We can give them that opportunity by providing a physical space where they can come and test and experiment with a community of their peers.
    Developing successful products and services. We know that our innovator and technology community are completely adept at creating new ideas
    and bootstrapping their businesses with ingenuity and skill. But sometimes the start-up runway is tight. Many of the revolutionary technologies that made the iPhone and other services “smart” were actually the result of government funding.
    The Internet, GPS, touchscreen displays as well as Siri did not just benefit from government-funded research activity but also received early stage finance from the US government Small Business Investment Company Program. In these cases the venture capitalists entered only after government research funding had gotten these companies to the critical proof of concept. Google’s algorithm, don’t forget, was funded by the National Science Foundation.
    So, we feel that CDEC can play its part by supporting our innovators in the UK in much the same way. We can help scale, we can provide a place to play and experiment and we can network SME’s into bigger business, R&D and Academia to help make that runway a little bit longer.
  • The difficulty of integrating and mashing up different data sets and sources. These involve skill sets that don’t always reside in the SME community, or that can be costly for them to access and deploy or difficult for them to know where to access. We can offer help here with our technology capability and access to R&D and Academic communities.
    Exploiting next generation connectivity.
    Horizon scanning and keeping abreast of the next big thing is an important element of entrepreneurship and innovation. But often smaller companies don’t have the time or space to play and experiment with what is coming next to better understand how they may need to configure or iterate their products to remain relevant.
    We can give them that opportunity by providing a physical space where they can come and test and experiment with a community of their peers.
    Developing successful products and services. We know that our innovator and technology community are completely adept at creating new ideas
    and bootstrapping their businesses with ingenuity and skill. But sometimes the start-up runway is tight. Many of the revolutionary technologies that made the iPhone and other services “smart” were actually the result of government funding.
    The Internet, GPS, touchscreen displays as well as Siri did not just benefit from government-funded research activity but also received early stage finance from the US government Small Business Investment Company Program. In these cases the venture capitalists entered only after government research funding had gotten these companies to the critical proof of concept. Google’s algorithm, don’t forget, was funded by the National Science Foundation.
    So, we feel that CDEC can play its part by supporting our innovators in the UK in much the same way. We can help scale, we can provide a place to play and experiment and we can network SME’s into bigger business, R&D and Academia to help make that runway a little bit longer.
  • Cdec bristol

    1. 1. “Supporting digital innovation to power sustained economic growth in the UK” Name: Neil Crockett Title: CEO Twitter name: @CDECatapult
    2. 2. The data value chain
    3. 3. Following the heat 3 initial sectors •Creative & Media •Digital Health •Digitally Enabled Cities
    4. 4. 4 key challenges •Difficulty of mashing content and data - Skills and time - Trust, privacy and licensing •Exploiting next gen connectivity •Developing successful products - User centricity and design and business models •Accelerating the best digital ideas to market
    5. 5. Initial focus framework Initial strategic projects Initial quickstart projects Developing commercially successful new applications, services and products, based on new business models, security and trust, and user centricity UK CDEC Innovator Centre
    6. 6. CDEC creative engagement and projects NVI events chaired by CDEC linking Abertay, London, Birmingham, Sunderland UK ENGAGEMENT HEADLINES - 15+ University engagements - 40+ Business engagements - 7 Cluster visits - 18 Presentations - 4 Projects live (2 with other Catapults) - 10 further projects in discussion - 9 Collaboration agreements in discussion - 4 Webinars Edinburgh & Glasgow FP7 media project and collaboration agreements in discussion Belfast. Future media projects in discussion UK wide innovator to innovator platform and marketplace in discussion Manchester cluster visit planned for December 13 DTG future media and health services project in scoping Bristol cluster visit and webinar Copyright Hub project in scoping Brighton cluster visit in development
    7. 7. CDEC working with creative / media clusters and organisations CDEC Media/C reative Clusters Bristol / Bath Manchester London (TC, Soho, IL) Brighton Northern Ireland Cardiff Scotland (Abertay, Edinburgh, Glasgow) Networks Orgs DTG BBC Mozilla Disney Nesta Design Council Design SIG Creative England UCL NVI CREATe AHRC Creative Hubs CIKTN Copyright Hub Group
    8. 8. How do we identify a cluster? Supply of specialist higher level skills and R&D Established anchor businesses Critical mass of creative people A shared and linked vision between key stakeholders Mixed, complimentary sectors Start-up scene and support Access to connectivity and infrastructure
    9. 9. The value of CDEC to clusters - A powerful neutral convener - Links and bridges across and between clusters - Listens and identifies barriers to innovation - Builds solutions and provides new capabilities in collaboration - Helps the best innovators to be heard – project, collaboration and showcase studios
    10. 10. The Bristol opportunity Supply of specialist higher level skills and R&D - Bristol is a significant creative and media cluster - Potential for collaborative projects that CDEC could support, which link R&D or new challenges (from uni’ and bus’) with the creative and tech innovator base - Opportunities which build on Bristol as a creative city linking creative and media innovators with challenges faced in healthcare and/or cities - For example: Could new pervasive media platforms and hyper local services be developed to provide better preventative healthcare solutions in Bristol, which would be open to innovators and improve quality of life? Established anchor businesses Critical mass of creative people A shared and linked vision between key stakeholders Mixed, complimentary sectors Start-up scene and support Access to connectivity and infrastructure
    11. 11. The Bristol opportunity Come to us with collaborative proposals (new or existing) that fit our criteria: 1. In the data value chain 2. Do not duplicate but add value 3. Convening ratio of at least £2 to £1 4. The market would not solve in a timely manner 5. Open to innovators 6. Can scale @CDECatapult @cgthompson Info@cde.catapult.org.uk
    12. 12. Questions? ♯cdecbristol @CDECatapult

    ×