Developing Effective Health Communication Campaigns for Your STD Program
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Developing Effective Health Communication Campaigns for Your STD Program

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Developing Effective Health Communication Campaigns for Your STD Program:

Developing Effective Health Communication Campaigns for Your STD Program:
Skill Building & Lessons Learned from the Field

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  • HC- Involves more than production of messages & materials Research/audience-centered Doesn’t necessarily use mass media or advertising, but is focused on communication. [VS MEDIA CAMPAIGN: “ A planned program using (the mass media or) advertising aimed at a particular target market or audience over a defined period of time for the purpose of increasing sales or raising awareness of a product or service.”]
  • 2. Test concepts & messages for: Acceptability, Understandability, Relevance, Appropriateness, Effectiveness, Credibility, Potential unintended consequences Identify effective messaging, design, format, tone, sources, channels & settings. 4. Process Evaluation/ Tracking Are messages delivered appropriately, effectively, efficiently? Are messages reaching intended audiences & meeting info needs? Identify partnership successes/failures, emerging partner needs Need for refinements/redirection? Outcome/Impact Evaluation Has campaign impacted audience awareness, knowledge, attitudes, or behavior? Are there any unforeseen results/unintended consequences? Need for refinement/redirection?
  • 1. Exploratory research used to assess the health issue & identify all components of possible solutions: Review available data (epi, beh, consumer srv, other) Environmental scan to identify gaps & best practices Determine appropriate roles for health communication//Identify necessary approaches for bringing about desired change Establish logical program development process communication program that supports clearly defined objectives, Set priorities Assign responsibilities & assess progress (accountability) Avert potential disaster
  • Findings from consumer research should be applied strategically & with caution: Attention-getting vs. stigmatizing
  • Focus: based on commercial marketing practices, BEHAVIOR change (not just attitude, awareness) Increasingly, focus is shifting beyond individual behavior (lifestyle) change, to use marketing principles to: improve social & economic conditions promote social policy change. to address poverty, hunger, housing, unemployment, education, environment, crime, social support The consumer= the central focus for planning and conducting a program. strategies based on their wants and needs rather than what good health practice directs that they should do. While people want health, it is not always a priority. Often, to achieve it, people must give up time, convenience, money, pleasure. What’s the benefit to consumer?
  • “ Marketing Mix” Product. Targeted behavior change +/ potential benefits/gains for intended audience Price. Cost to consumer to receive program benefits (in/tangible); what consumer must give up Promotion. How the exchange is communicated (appeals used) Place . Channels & settings used to reach intended audience (e.g., mass media, community, interpersonal) These strategies evolve from consumer research -to determine what benefits and costs they would consider acceptable and how they might be reached. importance of understanding intended audiences
  • Note: promise without delivery = extremely damaging Brand aims to generate buzz, remove taboo & stigma around STD testing Get youth talking about testing in a way in which they are comfortable call to action that becomes part of youth’s vernacular
  • audience has primary, interactive role in process Both= grounded in consumer research - to determine: - what benefits and costs they would consider acceptable how they might be reached. importance of understanding intended audiences & designing strategies based on their wants and needs (rather than what good health practice directs that they should do) Segmentation: the purpose of finding & addressing common benefits/barriers SM considers each element of the marketing mix & how they could be applied to the situation & selects the best elements to address it, based on goals & resources.

Developing Effective Health Communication Campaigns for Your STD Program Developing Effective Health Communication Campaigns for Your STD Program Presentation Transcript

  • Developing Effective Health Communication Campaigns for Your STD Program: Skill Building & Lessons Learned from the Field 2010 National STD Prevention Conference Pre-Conference Academy March 8, 2010 The findings and conclusions in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Health Communication (HC)
    • “ The study & use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual & community decisions that enhance health.”
    • – National Cancer Institute
  • Health Communication
    • Based on an understanding of the needs & perceptions of intended audiences.
    • 4 stages of HC process:
      • 1. Planning & Strategic Dev
      • 2. Concept & Message Dev/Testing
      • 3. Implementation
      • 4. Evaluation & Refinement
    • Source: NCI. Making Health Communication Programs Work ( 2002)
  • Strategic Planning The Foundation of HC Programs
    • Assess health issue & identify all components of possible solutions
      • Review available data
      • Identify existing activities (success/failures) & gaps
      • SWOT analysis
      • Determine whether communication is appropriate
    • Define communication objectives
    • Define & learn about target audiences
    • Explore settings, channels & activities best suited to reach intended audiences
    • Identify potential partners
    • Develop communication strategy for each intended audience
  • Considerations for HC efforts
    • Measurable goals
    • Identified target audience(s)
    • Strategies developed/refined based on consumer research, continuous assessment, evaluation
      • Findings from consumer research should be applied strategically & with caution
      • Efforts should not stigmatize or perpetuate myths, stereotypes.
    • What works in one community may not work in another.
  • Social Marketing (SM)
    • “ The use of commercial marketing * concepts, tools and programs designed to influence individuals’ behavior to improve their well being and that of society.”
    • – Social Marketing Institute
    • * Marketing = human activity directed at satisfying needs and wants through exchange process (i.e., transfer between two parties of something that has value to each party).”
    • - Kotler, 1976
  • Marketing Tools: The 4 P’s
    • Product
    • Price
    • Promotion
    • Place
    • These strategies evolve from consumer research (needs, desires, core values, perceived benefits)
    • Requires changing the offering to meet audience’s needs & wants; reframing the desired behavior to reinforce core values
  • Redefining the Public Health Product
    • “ Good marketers do not seek to persuade target audiences to do what the marketer believes they ought to do…Rather, they recognize that customers only take action when they believe it is in their interests…They recognize that they must often change their social marketing offerings & the way these are presented…”
    • Andreasen, 1995 (p.14-15)
  • Branding a marketer’s “emotional tool”
    • Combines & reinforces the functional & emotional benefits of offering
    • Facilitates recognition
    • Makes a promise & delivers satisfaction
    • Encourages consumption & loyalty (adds value)
    • Example:
            • Youthful, empowering social movement
            • Brand aims to generate buzz, remove taboo & stigma around STD testing
            • Get youth talking about testing in a way in which they are comfortable
            • call to action that becomes part of youth’s vernacular
  • HC & SM: Similarities & Differences
    • Both are audience-centered , research-based (strategy-driven), & use segmentation for more effective targeting.
      • By definition, SM efforts target more than awareness/attitude change; focus is on behavior or social change.
      • In addition to communication strategies, SM applies strategic marketing principles to repackage, reposition & reframe the public health product.
        • Make it ‘fun, easy, popular” (Smith)
  • Contact Me
    • Allison Friedman, MS
    • Health communication Specialist
    • Behavioral & Interventions Research Branch
    • Division of STD Prevention
    • Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
    • (404) 639-8537
    • [email_address]