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FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife
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FYN Principle #5 - Attract Wildlife

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FYN Principle #5: …

FYN Principle #5:
Right Plant, Right Place

Rebecca McNair & Allison Steele
Florida Yards & Neighborhoods Program
http://charlotte.ifas.ufl.edu

Published in: Self Improvement, Business
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Attracting Wildlife Food Fruit Bearing Nectar Plants Larval Plants Cover Water Puddling Station Birdbaths Managing For Wildlife Weeds Nuisance Animals More Information Author: Rebecca McNair
    • 2. All Animals Need:
        • Food
        • Cover
        • Water
        • Space
      • Animals will only reside or forage in an area that contains enough of these four essential elements to maintain daily activities.
      Habitat
    • 3. Food
      • Fruit
      • Seeds
      • Insects
      • Nectar
      • Larval
      • Meat
      • Remember to provide food year-round, especially in winter.
      Attract a variety of birds, reptiles, bats, butterflies and other insects
    • 4. Fruit Bearing Plants for North Florida Beautyberry Calicarpa americana Tupelo Nyssa ogeche Wild grape Vitis sp.
    • 5. Mulberry Morus rubra
      • Large native tree ~ 40 ft
      • Full sun
      • Throughout Florida
      • Edible fruit in spring
      • Brittle bark, messy
      (USDA Zone 5-9)
    • 6. Chickasaw Plum Prunus angustifolia
      • Native tree ~10 ft
      • Full to partial sun
      • Blooms early spring
      • Edible fruit
      • Suckers tend to form thickets
      (USDA Zone 8-10)
    • 7. Holly Ilex spp.
      • Native shrubs and trees
      • Sun to partial shade
      • Range varies
      • Fruit remains through winter, attracting birds
      • Salt, drought and shade tolerant
      • Suckers
      Gallberry Ilex glabra Dahoon Holly Ilex cassine (USDA Zone 6-9)
    • 8. Virginia Willow Itea virginica (USDA Zone 6-10A)
      • Native shrub ~ 7 ft
      • Full to partial sun
      • Blooms spring
      • Drought and flood tolerant
      • Suckers tend to form thickets
    • 9. Fruit Bearing Plants for South Florida Photo by Joe Schaefer Sea Grape Coccoloba uvifera McCabe Bluestem Palm Sabal minor Southern Red Cedar Juniperus silicicola Bryan
    • 10. Elderberry Sambucus canadensis (USDA Zone 3-7)
      • Native shrub ~15 ft
      • Full to partial sun
      • Throughout Florida
      • Fragrant flowers year-round
      • Edible fruit
    • 11. Florida Privet Forestiera segregata (USDA Zone 9-11)
      • Native shrub ~10 ft
      • Full to partial sun
      • Throughout Florida
      • Fast grower
      • Drought and salt tolerant
      • Dense cover and fruits attract birds
    • 12. Wild Coffee Psychotria nervosa (USDA Zone 11)
      • Native shrub ~8 ft
      • Partial to full shade tolerant
      • Blooms spring- summer
      • Attracts butterflies and birds
    • 13. Nectar Plants for North Florida Buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis Cardinal flower Lobelia cardinalis Coneflower Echinacea purpurea
    • 14. Golden Dew Drop Duranta repens ( USDA Zone 8-11)
      • Shrub ~ 14 feet
      • Full to partial sun
      • Blooms year- round
      • Throughout Florida
      • High drought tolerance
      • Attracts butterflies
    • 15. Porterweed Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (USDA Zone 8-11)
      • Native and non-native perennial ~ 4 ft
      • Full to partial sun
      • Blooms year-round
      • Medium salt and drought tolerance
      Red variety is non-native
    • 16. Coral Honeysuckle Lonicera sempervirens (USDA Zone 6-9A)
      • Native vine
      • Full to partial sun
      • Blooms spring- fall
      • Throughout Florida
      • Attract butterflies and hummingbirds
    • 17. Nectar Plants for South Florida Mexican Flame Vine Senecio confusis Firebush Hamelia patens Yellow Shrimp Plant Pachystachys lutea Red Shrimp Justicia spicigera
    • 18. Necklace Pod Sophora tomentosa (USDA Zone 10B-11)
      • Native shrub ~ 8 ft
      • Full sun
      • Blooms year-round
      • High salt and drought tolerance
      • Attracts humming-birds and butterflies
      • Poisonous to humans
    • 19. Jatropha Jatropha integerrima (USDA Zone 10B-11)
      • Shrub ~ 8 feet
      • Full sun
      • Blooms year- round
      • Drought tolerance
      • Fruit is poisonous to humans
    • 20. Larval Plants for North Florida
      • Willow, Salix caroliniana is a larval host of the Viceroy.
      Matchweed, Phyla nodiflora is the larval host of the Buckeye.
    • 21. Red Bay Persia borbonia (USDA Zone 7-10B)
      • Native tree ~ 40 ft
      • Full to partial sun
      • Throughout Florida
      • Drought and salt tolerant
      • Blooms in spring attract butterflies
      • Purple fruit attract birds
      Bays are larval food for the spicebush swallowtail. Joe Schaefer
    • 22. Milkweed Asclepias spp. (USDA Zone 8-10A)
      • Shrub ~ 4 ft
      • Natives available
      • Full to partial sun
      • Blooms year-round
      • Throughout Florida
      • Drought tolerant
      • Nectar attracts hummingbirds and butterflies
      Larval host of Monarch and Queen
    • 23. Passion flower Passiflora spp. (USDA Zone 6-11)
      • Vine
      • Native varieties available
      • Full to partial sun
      • Blooms year-round
      • Throughout Florida
      Larval host of Gulf Fritillary
    • 24.
      • Native shrub ~ 3 ft
      • Full-partial sun
      • Salt and drought tolerant
      • Throughout Florida
      • Insignificant bloom
      Coontie Zamia pumila (USDA Zone 9-11) Larval host of Atala butterfly, found only in southeast Florida.
    • 25. Larval Plants for South Florida Wild Tamarind Lysiloma latisiliquum larval host of Cloudless Sulphurs Green Shrimp Blechum brownei Larval host of the Malachites
    • 26.
      • Native tree ~25 ft
      • Full to partial sun
      • Blooms year-round
      • Salt and drought tolerant
      Wild Lime Zanthozylum fagara (USDA Zone 11) Larval host of Giant Swallowtail
    • 27.
      • Vine
      • Full to partial sun
      • Blooms summer-fall
      • Medium drought tolerance
      Dutchman’s Pipe Aristolochia spp. (USDA Zone 8-11) Larval host of Pipevine swallowtail
    • 28. Senna (syn. Cassia) Senna spp . (USDA Zone 10-11)
      • Native and non-native shrubs ~ 6-10 ft
      • Full to partial sun
      • Blooms fall- spring
      • Fast growing, short-lived
      (non-native) Desert Cassia Senna polyphylla Larval host of Sulphurs Chapman’s Senna Senna mexicana var. chapmanii
    • 29. Cover
      • Vertical layers
      • Evergreen species for winter cover
      • Standing dead trees, or “snags”
      • Brush pile
    • 30. Water
      • Permanent water feature
      • Sound of running water attracts many animals
      Puddling-Butterflies obtain water and minerals from liquid in pore spaces. Puddling station Sandra Granson
    • 31. Design a Puddling Station
      • Layer sand in saucer
      • Add layer of compost
      • Place pebbles on top
      • Add water slowly (to pebble layer)
      • Place saucer on upside down pot
    • 32. Birdbath
      • Shallow with mildly sloping sides
      • Rough surface
      • Keep clean
      • Rinse off any soap residue
      Audubon Society recommends changing the water and cleaning bird baths weekly to avoid spreading avian diseases.
    • 33. Managing for Wildlife
      • Vertical layers of vegetation
      • Plant natives
      • No pesticides!
      • Stop mowing- Weeds add wildlife value to your yard!
      Long-tailed skipper feeding on Spanish needle. Bidens alba
    • 34. Wild Wonderful Weeds Pokeweed Phytolacca americana Horsemint Monarda punctata Blanket flower Gaillardia pulchella Coreopsis Coreopsis spp.
    • 35. Tolerance of Nuisance Animals
      • Diggers (moles, gophers, squirrels, armadillos, tortoises)
        • Bring nutrient to surface
        • Loosen & aerate soil
        • Feed on turf and landscape pests
        • Trapping and deterrents
      • Herbivores
      • (deer, rabbits, ducks)
        • Contribute to food web, circle of life
        • Nets and fencing may protect fruits
        • Harassment or nest removal for non-natives
      Pocket Gopher Marsh rabbit Armadillo
    • 36. More Wild Information
      • Florida Cooperative Extension Service - Wildlife Program
      • www.wec.ufl.edu/extension
        • Print on demand
        • Links and information
        • Educational programs
      • Florida Wildlife Habitat Program
      • Local Audubon Society
    • 37. Further Reading Http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu
      • WEC-20 Dealing with Unwanted Wildlife in an Urban Environment
      • SS-WEC-70 Threats to Florida's Biodiversity
      • WEC-72 Saving Endangered Species: How You Can Help
      • WEC-44 Water for Wildlife
      • SS-WIS-09 Native Plants that Attract Wildlife: Central Florida
      • SS-WIS-22 Butterfly Gardening in Florida
      • SS-WIS-21 Hummingbirds of Florida
    • 38. Thanks for your attention!
      • The following presentation was made possible through a grant from FL DEP and EPA. Special thanks to the following reviewers for their valued contributions:
        • FL114 ELM Design Team and the FYN Subcommittee
        • Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, UF
        • Agriculture Education and Communication Department
        • Environmental Horticulture Department
        • Entomology and Nematology Department
        • Soil and Water Sciences Department
        • Florida Cooperative Extension Service in: Alachua, Broward, Clay, Hillsborough, Lake, Miami-Dade, Orange, Pinellas Sarasota, and Volusia Counties
        • Florida Organics Recycling Center for Excellence
        • The Center For Wetlands, UF
        • United States Department of Agriculture
        • Division of Plant Industry

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