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Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment
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Payments for Ecosystem Services in the Cotswold Catchment

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  • 1. Payments For Ecosystem Services (PES) in the Cotswold Catchment Chris Short, CCRI, University of Gloucestershire
  • 2. Development of PES partnership • Grew from Upper Thames Pilot Catchment • Identify PES assets within the catchment (ILD) o People (the sellers and beneficiaries) o Link existing data and programmes (Defra pilot) o Partnership approach to development o Shared problem solving
  • 3. Who is involved • Sellers – farmers involved at start, data input • Beneficiaries/Buyers • Private sector (Thames Water, Ecotricity) • Local communities (develop and benefit from) • Public Sector (EA and NE) • Facilitators – making links, develop framework
  • 4. What is ‘in’ the PES framework • • • • • • Water Quality (drinking water and WFD) Community services (flood, amenity, others) Energy production with benefits (Ecotricity) Water flow & biodiversity (EA, NE, communitys) Food production/protected landscape/tourism Layering of PES (via restoration of catchment)
  • 5. Achieved by • PES securing appropriate farming practice – Selection and location of crops – Rotation and pest management – Combined food and energy – Soil management for PES • Secure enough for Buyers? • Viable for Sellers?
  • 6. Triggers • WFD failings • Concern about Metaldehyde levels winter 12/13 1
  • 7. Social Learning Approach Collins & Ison 2009
  • 8. Concerted action • By farmer on farm – Nitrate, Phosphate and Ammonia + field diary • By TW/UWE – Metaldehyde, pesticides • By CSF – organic matter • Joint discussion of data • Agree way forward – management options – knowledge gaps 13 12 1 1 9 10 7 6 8 5 4 3 2 1
  • 9. Summary of PES Approach • Partnership approach (Phase 1) – Part of the solution, in at the start • • • • • • Multiple services under one (layered) PES Sellers and Buyers involved in developing Demonstration events & knowledge exchange Co-production of options Development of PES framework (Phase 2) Phase 3 onwards to deal with implementation
  • 10. Thank you cshort@glos.ac.uk

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