CBPR Approach to Develop andImplement Air Quality Mitigation           MOLLY KRANS       LOMA LINDA UNIVERSITY      SCHOOL...
Introduction Loma Linda University   MPH Students ENRRICH   Environmental Railyard Research Impacting Community    Hea...
Background       Ramona Alessandro Elementary    •    Less than 490 yards away from the San Bernardino Railyard         (...
Motivating Concerns•   Short and long term exposure to air pollution has    been seen to cause detrimental health effects....
Motivating Concerns•       Those living nearby traffic dense areas develop        respiratory deficiencies.    •    Childr...
Methods•   Windshield Survey- Photovoice•   Key Informant Interviews•   Secondary Literature Review•   Focus Groups•   Est...
Data Analysis•       Windshield Surveys•       Secondary literature•       Analysis of field notes•       Key informant in...
Intervention•       Tree barrier would mitigate the detrimental health        effects of air pollution at Ramona Alessandr...
Tree Barrier Trees in New York City   1,821 metric tons of air pollution removed   Estimated value to society of 9.5 mi...
Goals Establish partnerships for a future tree barrier   Cal Poly Pomona   University of California Riverside   Pope L...
Our Product Handbook    Case study of our project        Field briefs, key informant interviews, focus groups, contact ...
Lessons Learned “Commitment of Understanding” with community  group Time Constraint Flexible   Focus on the experience...
Acknowledgements• Loma Linda University School of Public Health• Environmental Railyard Research Impacting    Community He...
Thank you
Conceptual View
Trees and Shrubs
Groundcover Palette
CCIH 2012 Conference, Breakout 4, Molly Krans, Student Project Session, CBPR Approach to Development and Implement Air Qua...
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CCIH 2012 Conference, Breakout 4, Molly Krans, Student Project Session, CBPR Approach to Development and Implement Air Quality Mitigation

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Molly Krans of Loma Linda University explains how community-based participatory research is an equal partnership between experts and community members and provides examples of communities used tree barriers to mitigate the effects of air pollution.

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  • Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is research that is conducted as an equal partnership between traditionally trained "experts" and members of a community. In CBPR projects, the community participates fully in all aspects of the research process.[1] CBPR projects start with the community. Community is often self-defined, but general categories of community include geographic community, community of individuals with a common problem or issue, or a community of individuals with a common interest or goal. CBPR encourages collaboration of “formally trained research” partners from any area of expertise, provided that the researcher provide expertise that is seen as useful to the investigation by the community, and be fully committed to a partnership of equals and producing outcomes usable to the community. Equitable partnerships require sharing power, resources, credit, results, and knowledge, as well as a reciprocal appreciation of each partner's knowledge and skills at each stage of the project, including problem definition/issue selection, research design, conducting research, interpreting the results, and determining how the results should be used for action. CBPR differs from traditional research in many ways. One of the principal ways in which it is different is that instead of creating knowledge for the advancement of a field or for knowledge's sake, CBPR is an iterative process, incorporating research, reflection, and action in a cyclical process.
  • Vital capacity is the maximum amount of air a person can expel from the lungs after a maximum inhalation. It is equal to the inspiratory reserve volume plus the tidal volume plus the expiratory reserve volume.A person's vital capacity can be measured by a spirometer which can be a wet or regular spirometer. In combination with other physiological measurements, the vital capacity can help make a diagnosis of underlying lung disease.
  • According to Nowak (2000) “Trees in New York City removed an estimated 1,821 metric tons of air pollution at an estimated value to society of 9.5 million dollars” (pg.23). This research shows that the planting of trees will remove harmful air pollutants and will benefit the community as a whole. In fact, it has been shown that the way trees are planted and which species are used also affect the amount of air pollutants that may be removed by trees. According to research done by Lancaster University, mature, mixed woodlands capture airborne particles at three times the rate of grasslands (Stewart et al., 2004)
  • According to Nowak (2000) “Trees in New York City removed an estimated 1,821 metric tons of air pollution at an estimated value to society of 9.5 million dollars” (pg.23). This research shows that the planting of trees will remove harmful air pollutants and will benefit the community as a whole. In fact, it has been shown that the way trees are planted and which species are used also affect the amount of air pollutants that may be removed by trees. According to research done by Lancaster University, mature, mixed woodlands capture airborne particles at three times the rate of grasslands (Stewart et al., 2004)
  • CCIH 2012 Conference, Breakout 4, Molly Krans, Student Project Session, CBPR Approach to Development and Implement Air Quality Mitigation

    1. 1. CBPR Approach to Develop andImplement Air Quality Mitigation MOLLY KRANS LOMA LINDA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
    2. 2. Introduction Loma Linda University  MPH Students ENRRICH  Environmental Railyard Research Impacting Community Health  Environmental Justice issues Ramona Alessandro Elementary  Improve local air quality for students
    3. 3. Background Ramona Alessandro Elementary • Less than 490 yards away from the San Bernardino Railyard (SBR) • Continuous exposure to harmful air pollutants. SBR poses the greatest health risk when compared to any other California Railyard
    4. 4. Motivating Concerns• Short and long term exposure to air pollution has been seen to cause detrimental health effects.• According to a study done by Cakmak et. al. (2011), “increased traffic density within a two hundred meter radius of the neighborhood was associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms and a significant reduction in forced vital capacity in children.”
    5. 5. Motivating Concerns• Those living nearby traffic dense areas develop respiratory deficiencies. • Children whose lungs are still developing• The communities at a higher risk of exposure to harmful air pollutants tend to be marginalized, minority populations.
    6. 6. Methods• Windshield Survey- Photovoice• Key Informant Interviews• Secondary Literature Review• Focus Groups• Establish and Maintain Community Relationships through regular meetings
    7. 7. Data Analysis• Windshield Surveys• Secondary literature• Analysis of field notes• Key informant interviews • Transcription• Focus groups • Transcriptions Analyzed data to pull emerging themes
    8. 8. Intervention• Tree barrier would mitigate the detrimental health effects of air pollution at Ramona Alessandro Elementary • Decreasing harmful particulate matter
    9. 9. Tree Barrier Trees in New York City  1,821 metric tons of air pollution removed  Estimated value to society of 9.5 million dollars Ways trees are planted Species Used
    10. 10. Goals Establish partnerships for a future tree barrier  Cal Poly Pomona  University of California Riverside  Pope Landscaping  Local businesses for funding partnerships Create a handbook for next year’s Loma Linda student team to implement intervention
    11. 11. Our Product Handbook  Case study of our project  Field briefs, key informant interviews, focus groups, contact information, meeting minutes, funding information, demographics and the needs and assets assessment  “Steps to Building Partnerships and Identifying Resources in a Community ”
    12. 12. Lessons Learned “Commitment of Understanding” with community group Time Constraint Flexible  Focus on the experience and not the grade
    13. 13. Acknowledgements• Loma Linda University School of Public Health• Environmental Railyard Research Impacting Community Health (ENRRICH)• Ramona Alessandro Elementary School• Center for Community Action and Environmental Justice (CCAEJ)• Community Action Team (CAT)• Mayors Office of San Bernardino• Richard Pope & Associates Landscape Architecture• Cal Poly Pomona College of Environmental Design
    14. 14. Thank you
    15. 15. Conceptual View
    16. 16. Trees and Shrubs
    17. 17. Groundcover Palette

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