Growing a new lifestyle – one seed at a time                Pamela Mukaire –Loma Linda University/SPH                     ...
Adventists Health Study -2The AHS- 2 USDA giveback projectDr. Patti Herring:“I promised we were not just going tocome into...
Community labsPhase 1- Needs Assessment & Program       Windshield survey (n=9)       Key Informant Interviews        (n...
Confirmatory data•   65% of adults SBC are overweight or obese adults    and 42% of all deaths in the County are due to   ...
“We want gardens ….”Community gardens have been recognized as a ideal way of providing residents living in underserved are...
Setting goalsProject Goal•    This project aims to reduce, control and prevent the major     lifestyle-related diseases of...
Phase 2- Program ImplementationGardening Cites 4 community gardening locations [16th street,       Juniper, Perris, PAL M...
Program Components•   Health education•   Health Screening Clinics•   Gardening (instruction and support)•   Cooking demon...
EducationHealth education: – instruction for making positive lifestyle changes for    weight loss, lowering blood sugar, c...
Health appraisalHealth Screening Clinics - to assess hemoglobin A1C, full cholesterol    profile, kidney function, height,...
Community gardeningGardening instruction and support - gardening workshop hands-on    help for starting and actively maint...
Easy meals from your own produceCooking demonstrations – sharing easy recipes and healthy food    choices
Lets move!Physical activity motivation:•   Numbers of days/hrs in garden•   using pedometers and•   keeping walking activi...
Challenges•   Land access•   Utility access•   Start-up costs•   Continuity•   Motivating sustainable growing practices
Lessons Learned•Catering for the handicap• Incorporate more local leadership and resources for communityinvolvement• Hands...
Community GardeningHealthy          Food                      Strong                                Communities           ...
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CCIH 2012 Conference, Breatout 4, Pamela Mukaire, Student Session, Growing a New Lifestyle

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Graduate student Pamela Mukaire discusses a project to help people in two Southern California communities reduce their risk of diseases related to diet and lifestyle, such as diabetes and hypertension through increased access to nutritious food and community gardening.

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CCIH 2012 Conference, Breatout 4, Pamela Mukaire, Student Session, Growing a New Lifestyle

  1. 1. Growing a new lifestyle – one seed at a time Pamela Mukaire –Loma Linda University/SPH CCIH- June 2012
  2. 2. Adventists Health Study -2The AHS- 2 USDA giveback projectDr. Patti Herring:“I promised we were not just going tocome into the community and take, take,take data and then they wouldn’t hearfrom us again. This was a way for us togive back so we could improve theirhealth and quality of life.”
  3. 3. Community labsPhase 1- Needs Assessment & Program  Windshield survey (n=9)  Key Informant Interviews (n=18)  Church Members  Site Staff  Community Members  Confirmatory Focus Group (n=2)  15 Participants Needs Assessment Results  Lack of knowledge about diabetes & HBP  Limited access to healthy food choices  Lack of age appropriate venues for PE  Lack of motivation to establish healthier lifestyle habits & increased PE.
  4. 4. Confirmatory data• 65% of adults SBC are overweight or obese adults and 42% of all deaths in the County are due to obesity-related causes.• SB and Riverside counties house a large population of low-income Latino/Hispanic and Black/African Americans carrying a large disease burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension (HBP), and type 2 diabetes.• Limited access to nutritious foods, a safe environment for outdoor activity, and a lack of knowledge & skills about healthy living are major contributors
  5. 5. “We want gardens ….”Community gardens have been recognized as a ideal way of providing residents living in underserved areas with the opportunityto grow their own fruits & vegetables, and thus• Increase access & affordability,• While increasing their physical activity• Providing social networks and community strengthening
  6. 6. Setting goalsProject Goal• This project aims to reduce, control and prevent the major lifestyle-related diseases of obesity, diabetes, CVD, and HBP.Project Objectives:To increase:• Healthy life-style knowledge,• Access to nutritious fruits and vegetables,• Confidence in planting and maintaining a garden,• Physical activity, and• Improve participants’ quality of life Target Population • Local churches • CBOs serving the underserved • Community members self-reporting having diabetes, high blood pressure, weight issues, and lack of health care access
  7. 7. Phase 2- Program ImplementationGardening Cites 4 community gardening locations [16th street, Juniper, Perris, PAL Muscoy]  with a total of 168 garden plots  representing nearly 300 gardeners 2 Container garden groups (n80)- SACHS and LLU-Student gp GBGBC – 50 plots and 70 gardeners
  8. 8. Program Components• Health education• Health Screening Clinics• Gardening (instruction and support)• Cooking demonstrations• Physical activity motivation
  9. 9. EducationHealth education: – instruction for making positive lifestyle changes for weight loss, lowering blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure as needed.
  10. 10. Health appraisalHealth Screening Clinics - to assess hemoglobin A1C, full cholesterol profile, kidney function, height, weight , body mass index (BMI) and BP .
  11. 11. Community gardeningGardening instruction and support - gardening workshop hands-on help for starting and actively maintaining fruit and vegetable gardens of their choice.Materials developmentTOTManual – cite preparation to food preservation
  12. 12. Easy meals from your own produceCooking demonstrations – sharing easy recipes and healthy food choices
  13. 13. Lets move!Physical activity motivation:• Numbers of days/hrs in garden• using pedometers and• keeping walking activity logs
  14. 14. Challenges• Land access• Utility access• Start-up costs• Continuity• Motivating sustainable growing practices
  15. 15. Lessons Learned•Catering for the handicap• Incorporate more local leadership and resources for communityinvolvement• Hands-on demonstration is essential for new gardeners• Team work is essential for long-term success
  16. 16. Community GardeningHealthy Food Strong Communities Stress relief Improved Therapy Diets Fun & Exercise New Skills cultivated

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