Appleton/Schultz/Ross - CharityChannel Summit 2011 - Social Media, Major and Planned Gifts

1,605 views
1,477 views

Published on

This presentation contains three PowerPoint slide presentations by Kristen Schultz-Jaarda of Crescendo Interactive, Inc. (crescendointeractive.com/); Holly Ross (formerly of NTEN, but now with Drupal Association (association.drupal.org), and me (carolynmappletoninc.wordpress.com/).

Our workshop occurred during the CharityChannel Summit 2011 (Bally's-Las Vegas), a conference held in tandem with GPA: Grant Professionals Association (October 7, 2011). New email: carolynmappleton@gmail.com.

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,605
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Appleton/Schultz/Ross - CharityChannel Summit 2011 - Social Media, Major and Planned Gifts

  1. 1. Major Gift Fundraising and Social Media
  2. 2. Is Social Media Just for Young People?  NO  A major gift donor of>$1,000,000 to past nonprofit projects suggested I join Facebook  I reluctantly did so - but then, this led me to ask whydonors would use Facebook and other forms of social media?
  3. 3. “I’m keeping up with all my friends and family on Facebook. There are so many of them, and Facebook helps me keep track of everyone and what they are doing.”
  4. 4. GadgetsIf you own one of these,you probably own some ofthese ….
  5. 5. The Social Habit Edison Research and Arbitron 19th Edison/Arbitron Internet and Multimedia Research Series (2011)  52% of Americans have a social network profile  46 million check their social media sites/services daily 56% social media users own smartphones, and 64% have used them to update social networks  80% of social media users are on Facebook
  6. 6. Pew Internet &American Life ProjectTrend Data:Demographics of Internet UsersDecember, 2010 Ages 65 and older = fastest growing Facebook user group Ages 55 and older = next fastest Who’s Online Ages 50-64 : 76% Income: $75,000+ Ethnicity: White (80%), Black (69%), Hispanic (66%) Sex: Men (78%), Women (76%)
  7. 7. Major Gifts  Given by corporations, foundations and people of all ages, but keep in mind ….  80% of all donations are made by individuals  “Boomer” generation (born 1946-1964 ~ ages 47 to 65)and older have greater capacity to make major gifts (their children are grown, careers are established, they have saved and invested)
  8. 8. Can You Raise Millions on Facebook?  More properly, can Facebook help you raise millions through many small donations - yes!  “Do not attempt this at home”  Consult a knowledgeable professional or firm and sign-up for “crowdfunding” training  Remember, those wildly successful disaster reliefefforts garner “free” television, radio, Internet, and social media news coverage your cause may not attract
  9. 9. Your Work and Experiences CountIntermediate and advanced fundraising professionals … Donors remember you and your nonprofit, and they may wish to keep up with your work You count! Donors are using social media to conduct research about current trends and issues, just as they have traditionally used the Internet
  10. 10. A Fundraiser’s Use ofSocial MediaCarolyn’s Facebook Friends: Individual donors Children of donors Foundation executives Foundation trustees Corporate executives and nonprofit executives Professional advisors Media and public relations professionals Politicians My own family and friends Hidden “friends of friends”
  11. 11. Who are “Friends of Friends”? Sometimes donors/influencers wish to be hidden from view They may have security issues, yet still want to check-in on you Make sure you allow “friends of friends” to see your Facebook page
  12. 12. Maintaining Attention More nonprofits are requesting donations Competition is growing and donors cannot meet all demands Gain and maintain attention – use social media as part of your communications strategy
  13. 13. Making Life Easier for Donors Social media allows for quick access to information, but also information access at their convenience When more detailed information is needed, link to “document drop” services Social media allows donors to review information online, rather than physically carrying the the necessary (but cumbersome) documentation we provide to substantiate our requests
  14. 14. “Quasi” Personal Page of aFundraising Professional Tone – some personal information is included, but more often, general information of interest to many General Wall Posts – upcoming events, nonprofits and campaigns to watch, issues of concern, exciting news, occasional humor … but nothing too risque (yet not boring) Photo Essays – posting of event/activity photo albums, with commentary
  15. 15. Personal Page of aFundraising Professional “Real Lessons of the NPR Scandal”Ronald J. Schiller, The Chronicle ofPhilanthropy (June 9, 2011) “Donors want to talk to real people” Some nonprofits – including arts organizations I’ve worked with – have discovered this is often true While generally you should “play it safe,” don’t be afraid to be a “real person”
  16. 16. Educate and Support with “Apps”  Causes – support the causes of donors – even a small gift shows you care I’m Reading – book reviews provide opportunity to share opinions and information Questions – what you think matters, and sheds light on your personal concerns  And more ….
  17. 17. Versus a Formal Nonprofit Page Represent your organization and its mission objectively and professionally Don’t be too glib - too much posting could lead to “unfriending” Carefully consider each idea, photo, event, “like,” etc. before posting People tend to be more forgiving with a personal page versus a professional Facebook page
  18. 18. Major Gift Support Document posting services allow you to post slide presentations, newsletters, case statements, project overviews online
  19. 19. Why Post Fundraising Data Online? Funding decisions take time; easily accessible, attractive documents facilitate the process Empower your donors and volunteers with easy access to nonprofit information 24-7 and from diverse locations You can easily “link” to presentations when using Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, e-mail, or other media (including e-application grant forms)
  20. 20. How Much Campaign Data to Post? Major gift campaigns - consider when and how much information to provide - timing is essential Don’t burn out donors and prospects with too much information early-on Keep in mind the “60% raised” concept, before going public with your major gift effort Social media and the “public phase” of a major gift campaign – your campaign plan should include social media
  21. 21. Twitter Followers include professional colleagues, donors, and many I do not know Conversation tone is professional, informative, yet not devoid of humorLinkedIn Links with approved donors and professional colleagues Conversational tone is professionalWordPress Viewers come from other social media venues (links) Sharing professional experiences for general benefit informs readers how I work
  22. 22. Traditional Fundraising Professionals ~ Sometimes believe social media is a waste of time, or a passing fad~ State they are an “in-person” relationship-builder, with no interest in social media ~ Where are they headed?
  23. 23. Dodo (Raphus cucullatus)Commonly used as the archetype of an extinct species
  24. 24. Social Media Suggestions Take the time to learn, then plan time to use and manage it  Social media should not consume you, but don’t fear it  To ignore social media could mean you miss out on meaningful donor contact and interaction  Social media shows no signs of disappearing (join NTEN)
  25. 25. Learn What Your Donors Prefer  Many of your major donors are using social media  Identify social media venues where they are active But some will still prefer e-mail, or the good old fax machine  Tailor your communications to fit the prospect
  26. 26. Face-to-Face Yes, meeting with donors and prospective donors in person increases your chances of securing major gifts While cultivating relationships in order to reach the point of “asking” - as you attract new prospects to the fold - consider social media!
  27. 27. Be Donor Friendly To secure significant funding, fundraisers work to ensure their nonprofits are responsive and “donor friendly” Social media and new technologies can help Well-planned communication strategies that include social media help you get closer to donors, and give them greater insight into - and appreciation for – you and your nonprofit’s mission and work.
  28. 28. Thank You! Carolyn M. Appleton, CFRE  Website: http://home.earthlink.net/~cappleton LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/carolynmappleton  Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/CAROLYNAPPLETON WordPress Blog: http://carolynmappleton.wordpress.com/
  29. 29. Photographic CreditsPhotographs provided by the following were reproduced in this PowerPoint presentation: Ajani Charles (a j a n i photography: digital image solutions)  Iggy Uncensored (online)  Microsoft Office  John Ward Photography  Wikipedia
  30. 30. New Technologiesfor Planned Giving
  31. 31. Bequests 70%Gift Annuities 15%Trusts/ Life Estates 15%
  32. 32.  Average age of first Will is 44 Average age of first Bequest is 49 Average age of bequest donors is 58 79% of Bequest Donors have a relationship with charity
  33. 33. Bequest Boom! Boomer Bequest Potential • 7,000 per day Turn Age 65 • 2011 – 2020: 36 Million Boomers Will Turn Age 65 U.S. Census & U.S. Treasury
  34. 34.  Secure Donor Accounts Update Data as Needed Planning Resources Friend Gift Planner Friend GiftAttorney
  35. 35. Integrating Web Apps
  36. 36. Crescendo Web Portal Page • Click on GiftLegacyGiftLegacy Portal Page
  37. 37.  Keep alive and fed Vary time/length of posts Link back to your website Promote gift options and link to apps Link other accounts
  38. 38. Feature Gift OptionsTexas A&M University Foundation
  39. 39. “Friend” Heritage SocietyChapman University - Heritage Society Page
  40. 40.  Regular updates build readership Focus on your mission/cause Share stories of donors/beneficiaries Link to Twitter, Facebook & YouTube Wordpress.com Blogger.com
  41. 41. Advertise Legacy Society
  42. 42.  Tweet regularly Link to your website Use for event and seminar sign-up Link to other social media accounts
  43. 43. Market Donor EventsHebrew Home of Greater Washington
  44. 44. New Technologies for Planned Giving Holly Ross Executive Director, NTEN facebook.com/nten.org twitter.com/ntenhrossThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  45. 45. The Steps:
  46. 46. Step One:
  47. 47. A social media strategy map helps yourorganization think through objectives,audience, content, strategy, tools, andmeasurement to support yourorganization’s communications andInternet strategy. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  48. 48. • Objectives• Audience• Integration• Tools and Tactics• Measurement These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  49. 49. Objective•What do you want to accomplish with social media?•Describe how your social media objective supports orlinks to a specific goal from your organization’s strategicplan
  50. 50. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  51. 51. Organization Goal: Increase online ticket salesSocial Media Goal: Increase online community actions by 25% in one season. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  52. 52. • Objectives• Audience• Integration• Tools and Tactics• Measurement These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  53. 53. 1. Who must you reach with your social media efforts to meet your objective? Why this target group?2. Is this a target group identified in your organization’s communications plan?3. What do they know or believe about your organization or issue? What will resonate with them?4. What key points do you want to make with your audience?
  54. 54. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  55. 55. Step Two:
  56. 56. • Objectives• Audience• Integration• Tools and Tactics• Measurement These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  57. 57. Step Three:
  58. 58. One Way Homebase email Web Site search engine ads Audience Objective Social Listening Conversation ConnectingThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  59. 59. • May 2009• 100 Park ClosuresImminent• 500 Facebook Fans• Mostly Direct MailSupportsNew Strategy:Reach youngersupporters to preparefor a ballot initiative toprotect Californiaparks. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  60. 60. One Way Homebase email Web Site direct mail ads Recruit 5,000 new Facebook fans in one month Social Facebook YouTubeThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  61. 61. Home Base One Way Social o Web site o “Urgent o Facebook redesign to Grams” to: Welcome emphasize: o High Dollar Page o Petition Donors o Fan Videos o Facebook o Other on YouTube o Donations Members o ProspectsThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  62. 62. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  63. 63. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  64. 64. • $950,000 Raised• $300,000 Online • Tough to track specifically to social media• 46% of that came from supporters new to CSPF• Email list size grew in tandem with Facebook Fans, suggesting that they are highly related• Ballot initiative campaign is now live These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  65. 65. • Objectives• Audience• Integration• Tools and Tactics• Measurement These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
  66. 66. Tip One:
  67. 67. Tip Three:
  68. 68. Tip Four:
  69. 69. Tip Six:
  70. 70. Tip Seven:
  71. 71. Step Three:
  72. 72. Tip Ten:
  73. 73. • Objectives• Audience• Integration• Tools and Tactics• Measurement
  74. 74. Tip Ten:
  75. 75. • Allfacebook.com• John Haydon/Inbound Zombie: The Complete Facebook Guide For Small Non-Profits• BethKanter.org• Case Foundation: Social Media 101• Idealware Social Media Decision Making Guide
  76. 76. Thank You! Holly Ross ED / NTEN holly@nten.org Twitter.com/ntenhrossFacebook.com/nten.org

×