• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Districts and their Leaders: Fostering School Improvement and Student Learning
 

Districts and their Leaders: Fostering School Improvement and Student Learning

on

  • 190 views

This presentation goes into the importance of the improvement of school learning environments through family and community engagement. It also looks into former research, as well as more current ...

This presentation goes into the importance of the improvement of school learning environments through family and community engagement. It also looks into former research, as well as more current findings, that will help school administrators understand better how to better create these positive environments.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
190
Views on SlideShare
176
Embed Views
14

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 14

http://casdany.org 14

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Districts and their Leaders: Fostering School Improvement and Student Learning Districts and their Leaders: Fostering School Improvement and Student Learning Presentation Transcript

    • DISTRICTS ANDTHEIR LEADERS: How they foster schoolimprovement and student learning
    • STUDY FINDING 2.1HOW DISTRICTS HARNESS FAMILY AND COMMUNITY ENERGY FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT
    • PRIOR RESEARCH• Evidence linking family engagement with student learning• Studies of recent efforts to create more participatory structures in schools• Studies of changing power structures in schools• Evidence about collective leadership• Studies about district/school characteristics affecting family/community participation.
    • EARLIER FINDINGS“‟Subtle‟ aspects of family involvement--- parenting style and parental expectations…--may have a greater impact on student achievement than more „concrete‟ forms such as attendance at school conferences or enforcing rules at home regarding homework.”
    • THREE RESEARCH “LENS”• Political---Community engagement is “democracy in action”• Economic---Families are clients/customers and have a right to be heard• Cultural---Schools that are accountable to their communities reflect local values and customs
    • FINDING: SITE-BASEDMANAGEMENT DOESN’T ALTER SCHOOL DECISION-MAKING PATTERNS“Since it is easier for traditional power structures to remain in place when environmental factors remain stable and congenial, giving parents and teachers authority to make some school decisions may in some respects reinforce the status quo.”
    • “SOMEWHAT PARADOXICALLY…STRONG LEADERSHIP WILL BE NEEDED TO HELP ESTABLISH COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIPS AND TO FOSTER SHARED DECISION-MAKING.”
    • EVIDENCE DOES NOT SUPPORT THE VIEW THAT LOW LEVELS OF PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT REFLECT LOW LEVELS OF INTEREST. • Interest not always readily apparent. • Some may not know how to be involved helpfully. • Others may be reticent due to class differences.
    • STUDY METHODS• Principal surveys• Teacher surveys• Analysis of student achievement data• Interviews with district and building staff• Interviews with community members
    • SMALL GROUP WORK• Silently read the assigned case vignette.• Identify with your group the policies and practices which the district employed to involve parents and community members.• Compare these policies and practices with those used in your district.
    • LOOKING ACROSS THE CASES• Modeled community engagement• Partnered with individuals and groups• Willing to listen to public concerns• Included families/communities in district-level committees
    • IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE• District leaders need to engage in dialogues with principals about what openness to community and parental involvement means in practice.• Principals need to engage teacher and other staff members in similar discussions.• Districts should take an active role in teaching parents and other community members how to be involved.
    • KEY FINDINGS• Districts promote participatory democratic structures in schools by creating policies and expectations for participation on the part of a wide array of people and groups outside of the school.• Districts have more difficulty creating leadership teams that include diverse families and community members in more, as compared to less, affluent communities.
    • KEY FINDINGS (CONTINUED)• Outside of establishing traditional site-council structures, districts typically do not have a strong impact on principals‟ openness to community and parental involvement.• Schools with more community stakeholders on their site councils or building leadership teams tend to have principals who are more open to community-level involvement.
    • KEY FINDINGS (CONTINUED)• Student achievement does not seem to be influenced principals‟ by openness to community involvement.• Student achievement is higher in schools where teachers share leadership and where they perceive greater involvement by parents.