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4 Tips for Leaving a Dead-end Job [Webinar Slides]
 

4 Tips for Leaving a Dead-end Job [Webinar Slides]

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    4 Tips for Leaving a Dead-end Job [Webinar Slides] 4 Tips for Leaving a Dead-end Job [Webinar Slides] Presentation Transcript

    • CAREEREALISM TV Careers Done Write Leaving a Dead-end Networking Etiquette Job April 22, 2011 September 2011 Debra Wheatman, CPRW, CPCC Debra Wheatman, CPRW, CPCC President President Careers Done Write, Inc. debra@careersdonewrite.com Careers Done Write, Inc. 877-389-SEEK (7335) debra@careersdonewrite.com 877-389-SEEK (7335) Put your career in gear... Visit www.CareersDoneWrite.com Unpublished work © 2010 Careers Done Write, Inc. - Confidential and Proprietary.1 May not be reproduced, published or disclosed to others without written authorization of Careers Done Write. www.CareersDoneWrite.com
    • Q: So, what do you do if they make a counteroffer? Once you have made your decision to leave and accepted a new position, do not consider a counter offer. The message you are sending is that money is your primary motivator and you will take the offer from the highest bidder. If you take a counter offer, if there is a downturn in the market and the company has to conduct a layoff, rest assured, you will be the first to go. The acceptance of a counter demonstrates that you are not committed – only focused on the money. All industries are small; you are not positioning yourself as a trustworthy or viable resource. Unpublished work © 2010 Careers Done Write, Inc. - Confidential and Proprietary.2 May not be reproduced, published or disclosed to others without written authorization of Careers Done Write. www.CareersDoneWrite.com
    • Q: What should I say or avoid saying during my exit interview? Your exit interview is not an opportunity for you to slam the company, your coworkers or your boss. All of your interactions should be professional. If you have a specific concern, you can provide constructive feedback regarding your experience; but under no circumstances should you take the opportunity to complain or present your view in a negative way. You want to exit the company with feelings of goodwill. You never know when you will encounter these people again. Unpublished work © 2010 Careers Done Write, Inc. - Confidential and Proprietary.3 May not be reproduced, published or disclosed to others without written authorization of Careers Done Write. www.CareersDoneWrite.com
    • Q: If I am asked, should I divulge any information about mynew employer? It depends on what information you are asked. You should only share what you are comfortable revealing. If you are asked questions about salary, you are in no way obligated to answer. You can provide information regarding the nature of the work and in what capacity you will be operating. If you have accepted a position with a promotion or an opportunity for you to experience personal and professional growth, there is no reason not to share that information. This is a happy experience for you; take the time to provide your current employer with an understanding of how the work will be different and why you chose to make a switch. Unpublished work © 2010 Careers Done Write, Inc. - Confidential and Proprietary.4 May not be reproduced, published or disclosed to others without written authorization of Careers Done Write. www.CareersDoneWrite.com
    • Q: How do you avoid burning a bridge when leaving anemployer? Continue to perform your duties as you would. Do not use this as an opportunity to do nothing for your last two weeks with your current employer. If someone else was hired into your role, do what you can to train them and ensure they are up to speed on any current projects or assignments. Create a file with any outstanding deliverables and ensure that all of the work and / or files are properly organized to make it easier for the incumbent. You want to leave the company with a positive impression – they should have positive memories of you both personally and professionally. Unpublished work © 2010 Careers Done Write, Inc. - Confidential and Proprietary.5 May not be reproduced, published or disclosed to others without written authorization of Careers Done Write. www.CareersDoneWrite.com